Monday, 11 February 2019

Feb 11 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, 11 February 2019 (Monday)

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier
Transcript by: David Christie
Info Line telephone number: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Brian Coyle comments that his bird feeder yard is experiencing decreased patron numbers. He is very suspicious that a NORTHERN SHRIKE [Pie-grièche grise] is very active and is finding feathers around the yard and gets quick views of what suspects to be a shrike. Fortunately, Brian’s female NORTHERN CARDINAL [Cardinal rouge] that has been a regular since November is still present and doing fine. It gave Brian an excellent photo op.

Brian also shares some very interesting activity from a video-cam aimed at a large rock bordering on woods in a field across from his Lower Mountain Road home. Several videos show a RED FOX [Renard roux] scent-marking the rock, as they do at this time of year to attract females to check the elixir to see if it’s suitable for a potential mate. It is Red Fox breeding time to arrange for litters to arrive in the spring.  One video shows a COYOTE [Coyote] checking the fox markings. Note that this Coyote shows a lot of reddish pelage, showing the variety of colours that can occur in Coyotes. Check out the short video clips at the attached links



Brian also shares some MINK [Vison] trails that are around a small beaver dam. The Mink comes out a hole in the ice and enters into a portion of a canal via another hole in the ice, just above the beaver dam.


** Pam Watters and Phil Riebel were in Pasco County, Florida, and recently came across a RED-SHOULDERED HAWK [Buse à épaulettes], a rare bird for us here in a New Brunswick winter that has been teasing us in the Saint John area recently. Phil got a nice photo that looks very similar to some of the poses that the Saint John bird gave.


** Another heads up on the Nature Moncton GULL WORKSHOP scheduled for this Saturday, Feb. 16. The announcement that is on the website at <www.naturemoncton.com> under Upcoming Events, is added below. Participants are asked to leave their name with Louise Nichols, via e-mail at nicholsl@eastlink,ca

GULL IDENTIFICATION WORKSHOP 
Saturday February 16th, 2019
10:00 am (bring a lunch).  We should be done around 3:00 pm
Southeast ECO 360 Landfill site -- community room
100 Bill Slater Dr., Berry Mills Road
Presenter and Guide – Alain Clavette
Cost -- $8.00​​​ 
(Please reserve a spot with Louise Nichols at nicholsl@eastlink.ca)


For many birdwatchers, both beginners and more seasoned birders, the group that is the most challenging to identify in the field is often the LARIDS ...the GULLS!  In fact, they can be so challenging, they are often totally overlooked.

‘’That's really a shame because the possibilities of finding wonderful vagrants in the Maritimes are always there with these great hardy travelers’’ Alain Clavette, a convinced LARIDOPHILE, will tell you: ‘’Remember the story of Jonathan Livingston Seagull? “

Gulls are strong, powerful, hardy birds that can travel long distances without touching land. They can rest on the water and they can survive very intense storms. And who is more resourceful than a gull when it comes to finding food it can survive on pretty much anywhere?

On February the 16th, COME GULLING!! And learn the basics of NB’s gull identification. Join birder and U. de Moncton ornithology teacher Alain Clavette at the Moncton landfill where there are a lot of gulls to learn from. We will start the day at 10:00 am in the community room where Alain will show you a few tips on gulls via a PowerPoint presentation.  After lunch, we will go outside amongst hundreds of birds to watch and learn.

*Bring appropriate clothing as it is usually QUITE A BIT COLDER over there on the hill in the wind.




Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton



 
COYOTE TRAILS (POSSIBLE PAIR). FEBRUARY 2, 2019. BRIAN COYLE

MINK TRAILS. FEBRUARY 2, 2019.  BRIAN COYLE

MINK TRAILS. FEBRUARY 2, 2019.  BRIAN COYLE

NORTHERN CARDINAL (FEMALE). FEBRUARY 2, 2019. BRIAN COYLE

RED-SHOULDERED HAWK. FEB 10, 2019. PHIL RIEBEL

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