Tuesday, 12 November 2019

Nov 12 2019


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE,  November 12, 2019 (Tuesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: david.cannon@rogers.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**  The 2 FIELD SPARROWS [Bruant des champs]  John Inman had drop by his 225 Mary’s Point Road feeder yard on Sunday, returned on Monday, so hopefully they will find it comfortable enough to tarry there for a time. John’s photo nicely shows the pink bill, pink legs, white eye ring and the two white wing bars of this sparrow species. John also had AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS [Bruant hudsonien] join his yard troupe three days ago.

** Hay Island brought another special day to Peter and Deana Gadd. Present among the shorebirds was a PURPLE SANDPIPER [Bécasseau violet]. This is often not an easy sandpiper to get to see, even though it stays with us all winter. This is actually their second encounter with Purple Sandpipers this year, also seeing some at Escuminac Point earlier. Peter got a great photo of the Purple Sandpiper, and as well he got a special photo with some DUNLIN [Bécasseau variable] and SANDERLINGS [Bécasseau sanderling] beside the Purple Sandpiper.  Peter and Deana went around the northern tip of the island, which is a recommended route when visiting the island. The GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE [Oie rieuse] was not seen, so we assume it has moved on.

**   There has been a lot of comment about the lack of sparrows and other bird species this fall. In contrast, Louse Nichols reports that things seem to be normal around her Etter Ridge home. Louise comments “For what it’s worth, she had a noticeable movement of sparrows, especially WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS [Bruant à gorge blanche] on her property a month ago, in mid-October. Occasionally she could hear the juveniles trying out their songs. She hasn’t seen any DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoisé] yet, while last year she remembered there were quite a few around her yard in the early fall. She has been seeing lots of AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique] on almost a daily basis; a flock of about 40 were around Sunday morning. A couple of mornings ago, (she) saw a mixed flock of Robins, RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD [Carouge à épaulettes] and COMMON GRACKLES [Quiscale bronzé] in the front yard.”

   At my own feeder yard, all are coming that are to be expected at this time of year, except sparrows, which usually are present.

**   Brian Stone dropped by Mapleton Park on Saturday. He reports it was fairly quiet, but his camera still found lots of interesting subjects. The ponds had a skim of ice, but the MALLARD DUCKS [Canard colvert] were busy ice-breaking. Oddly enough, a night crawler (earthworm) was seen on the surface, which is not usual except as a result of rain. Icicles were forming and the MOUNTAIN ASH clusters had a white cap, looking like dessert. He had a 100+ EUROPEAN STARLINGS [Étourneau sansonnet] foraging on his lawn. A lot of these snow scenes will likely be a memory after the 11C temperatures, rain and wind in the Moncton area today. 

** Pat and I dropped by Gray Brook Marsh Pond Monday; there was a group of approximately 40 AMERICAN WIGEONS [Canard d'Amérique] actively feeding on the far side of the pond. The male EURASIAN WIGEON [Canard siffleur], that Gordon Rattray had spotted there several days ago, continues to be with the group. A lone female HOODED MERGANSER [Harle couronné] was near the group, but again on the far side of the pond.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton






FIELD SPARROWS.NOV 10, 2019. JOHN INMAN

PURPLE SANDPIPER. NOV 11, 2019. PETER GADD

PURPLE SANDPIPER, DUNLINS, AND SANDERLINGS. NOV 11, 2019. PETER GADD

SANDERLINGS. NOV 11, 2019. PETER GADD

DUNLIN. NOV 11, 2019. PETER GADD

EURASIAN WIGEON (MALE) WITH AMERICAN WIGEON. NOV 11, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

HOODED MERGANSER (FEMALE). NOV 11, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

MOUNTAIN ASH BERRIES. NOV. 09, 2019.. BRIAN STONE

MAPLETON PARK POND. NOV. 09, 2019. BRIAN STONE

ICICLE. NOV. 09, 2019. BRIAN STONE

MALLARD DUCK ICE BREAKING. NOV. 09, 2019. BRIAN STONE

NIGHTCRAWLER. NOV. 09, 2019. BRIAN STONE

EUROPEAN STARLINGS. NOV. 11, 2019. BRIAN STONE

Monday, 11 November 2019

Nov 11 2019


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, November 11, 2019 (Monday) 


To view the photos mentioned in this edition, go to <http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca>.

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at <http://naturemoncton.com>.

Edited by Nelson Poirier, <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>
Transcript by David Christie, <maryspt@mac.com> 
Info Line #:  506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

                                                      

** It’s nice to see feeder yard reports starting to come in. David and Anita Cannon have had their feeders partially up for four days and the response was immediate. They live on the Ammon Road, where the tree mix is predominantly deciduous. They have a large number of RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES [Sittelle à poitrine rousse], dozens of BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES [Mésange à tête noire], lots of expected DOWNY [Pic mineur] and HAIRY WOODPECKERS [Pic chevelu], as well as a presumed pair of WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCHES [Sittelle à poitrine blanche], as one has a much darker crown than the other. David attaches a photo of one of these nuthatches.

**Many have commented sparrows seem to be ‘missing in
 action’ this fall. On Sunday, John Inman was pleased to have
 a FIELD SPARROW arrive to ground scattered feed at his
 225 Mary’s Point Road yard. Later John’s sister Shannon
 saw a second Field Sparrow and John was able to get a
 photo of the two of them side by side. We don’t have a copy
 of that photo yet.
 
 



** Aldo Dorio has had no reports of the GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE [Oie rieuse] that had visited Hay Island on Saturday being seen on Sunday.

Like most berry-bearing shrubs that have clinging winter fruit, the WINTERBERRY [Houx verticillé] is doing well at Hay Island. This fruit is often not the first choice of bird connoisseurs, but is certain to be harvested. This past season has certainly been a good year for fruit and cone production.



Nelson Poirier   <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>   
Nature Moncton




WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH. NOV 10, 2019. DAVID CANNON

WINTERBERRY. NOV 10, 2019. ALDO DORIO

Sunday, 10 November 2019

Nov 10 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, November 10, 2019 (Sunday) 


To view the photos mentioned in this edition, go to <http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca>.

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at <http://naturemoncton.com>.

Edited by Nelson Poirier, <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>
Transcript by David Christie, <maryspt@mac.com> 
Info Line #:  506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

                                                      

** A nice find for Aldo Dorio at Hay Island on Saturday, when a GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE [Oie rieuse] provided him with photo ops. This is a special, uncommon goose that pops up in New Brunswick, often in company with CANADA GEESE [Bernache du Canada]. However, this bird was solo. Aldo spotted it just past the bridge, on the left hand side of the route onto the island. As Dave McLeod points out, the white area behind the pink-orange bill at the front of the face shows up nicely. Peter Gadd happened to be present, just as Isiae Comeau came to see the goose and got a nice open-wing photo of it. They watched it for 10 minutes before it flew back across the bridge and was not seen after, so it may or may not have left Hay Island.

Peter went around the northern tip of the island and saw a COMMON TERN [Sterne pierregarin] in juvenile plumage, a BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER [Pluvier argenté], 4 SANDERLINGS [Bécasseau sanderling] and 3 DUNLIN [Bécasseau variable], so November birding activity is still good at Hay Island, seeming not to be troubled by Friday’s storm.


** With WILD TURKEY [Dindon sauvage] in New Brunswick now being recognized by the New Brunswick Bird Records Committee, a contingent from Salisbury went on a Wild Turkey sleuthing mission to St. George and St. Stephen on Saturday, and Ron Steeves reports that they were not disappointed. They counted 103 birds, the largest group being a flock of 27. They have obviously become established, apparently coming in from Maine with no border or customs concerns.


** Georges Brun estimated a group of 100+ DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS [Cormoran à aigrettes] settled on Jones Lake on Friday. This would probably be a flock in migration that stopped for a rest, or possibly a re-fueling stop, as minnows are plentiful in Jones Lake.


** The ASIAN MULTI-COLORED LADY BEETLE (Harmonia axyridis) is the most common lady beetle we have overwintering in homes and especially in buildings that are only minimally heated in winter. Larry Sherrard and I came across a group overwintering in a high corner of a summer place in Parkindale on Saturday. This lady beetle is not native, but introduced. They normally have 19 spots on the elytra but the occasional one has no spots or just a few, as shown in the photos of the beetles in overwintering cluster.

Also in the Parkindale area where we were, there were many AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d’Amérique] in the 50+ range that seemed to be targeting over-ripe CHOKE CHERRIES [Cerisier à grappes], although other wild berries were available.



Nelson Poirier   <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>   
Nature Moncton





GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE. NOV 9, 2019.  ALDO DORIO

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE. NOV 9, 2019.  ALDO DORIO

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE. NOV 9, 2019.  ALDO DORIO

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE. NOV 9, 2019. PETER GADD

GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE. NOV 9, 2019. PETER GADD

COMMON TERN ( JUVENILE). NOV 9, 2019. PETER GADD

DUNLINS. NOV 9, 2019.  PETER GADD

DUNLINS. NOV 9, 2019.  PETER GADD
ASIAN MULTICOLORED  LADY BEETLES (OVERWINTERING CLUSTER). NOV 8, 2019. LARRY SHERRARD

ASIAN MULTICOLORED  LADY BEETLES (OVERWINTERING CLUSTER). NOV 8, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS NOV 8 2019 GEORGES BRUN 

DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS NOV 8 2019 GEORGES BRUN 

Saturday, 9 November 2019

Nov 9 2019


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, 9 November 2019 (Saturday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the info line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com







Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**Daryl Doucet reports seeing an adult NORTHERN GOSHAWK [Autour des palombes] on the O'Neill Road behind Salisbury on Friday afternoon. The Goshawk is always a special raptor to see, one that we seem to only see by being in the right place at the right time.

**Brian and Annette Stone looked at our first snow day of the season through different eyes by taking a walk in Mapleton Park, to appreciate the clean white new blanket. The new bridge was completed just in time, and Annette celebrated the occasion by christening it with a snowman. They comment the wildlife was very quiet, but the vistas were striking. Brian’s photos were all by cell phone, as his main camera was a bit timid to go out and face the weather.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton




NEW BRIDGE AT MAPLETON PARK IN NEW SNOW. NOV. 08, 2019. BRIAN STONE


SNOWMAN (YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR). NOV. 08, 2019. BRIAN STONE

NEW SNOW AT MAPLETON PARK. NOV. 08, 2019. BRIAN STONE

NEW SNOW AT MAPLETON PARK. NOV. 08, 2019. BRIAN STONE

NEW SNOW AT MAPLETON PARK. NOV. 08, 2019. BRIAN STONE

NEW SNOW AT MAPLETON PARK. NOV. 08, 2019. BRIAN STONE

Friday, 8 November 2019

Nov 8 2019


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, November 8, 2019 (Friday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

Please advise editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at
www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com.

** There was an error in the Thursday edition in the location Annette Stone observed the CANADA JAYs [Mésangeai du Canada].  It was in the Irishtown Nature Park, not Mapleton Park, and Brian Stone has done up a map to indicate where she saw them.  Canada Jays often adopt a year-round territory, so it is quite possible they could be regulars in that area to give possibilities for an audience with them.

** Lynda Leclerc again visited the man-made lake, Meadow Lake, near the Harrisville Rd. entrance to the Humphrey Brook trail.  She found four HOODED MERGANSERs [Harle couronné] there on Wednesday and all the regular MALLARDS [Canard colvert].  This is a nearby spot that many of us should be taking note of to visit to see what shows up there.

** Aldo Dorio had three WHITE-TAILED DEER [Cerf de Virginie] pay a visit to his Neguac yard on Thursday.  Aldo’s photos show the winter pelage coming on, going from summer brown to winter gray.  The hairs of the winter pelage are hollow to provide more effective insulation from the cold weather, whereas the summer hair coat lacks this hollow factor.  The yearly rut period has not started yet, so the wary antlered bucks are not often seen.  That should change soon when love is in the air!

** It’s Friday and this week’s Sky-at-a-Glance is included in this edition, courtesy of sky guru Curt Nason.  It’s looking like clear evening skies in the next week will be a special event in itself, but all that Curt mentions will still be there, ready for a clearer window when it happens.

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, 2019 November 9 – November 16
The observing highlight of the week, and of the year, is a transit of Mercury. On Monday, from 8:36 am to 2:04 pm, Mercury can be seen crossing the face of the Sun with a properly filtered telescope, providing the weather cooperates. A Mercury transit occurs only 13 or 14 times a century, and of those the Sun might not be up in New Brunswick or it might be cloudy. Although Mercury passes between Earth and the Sun every 116 days, it is usually above or below the Sun in our sky because its orbit is tilted to ours. It is only when Mercury reaches inferior conjunction within a few days of May 8 or November 10, when the two orbits line up with the Sun, that we see a transit. Mercury will be a tiny, sharply defined black circle moving slowly across the Sun, too tiny to be seen without a solar-filtered telescope.

Members of RASC NB, the provincial astronomy club, are planning public observing events for the Mercury transit. On Monday, look for safely-filtered telescopes set up at Bore View Park in Moncton, and in Saint John at Saints Rest Beach, at the entrance to Rockwood Park, and at Loyalist Plaza by Market Square. It will be 30 years before another Mercury transit is visible from New Brunswick.

This Week in the Solar System   
Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 7:11 am and sunset will occur at 4:54 pm, giving 9 hours, 43 minutes of daylight (7:14 am and 5:01 pm in Saint John).  Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 7:20 am and set at 4:46 pm, giving 9 hours, 26 minutes of daylight (7:23 am and 4:53 pm in Saint John).

The Moon passes near Uranus on Sunday and it is full, the Rivers Freezing Moon, on Tuesday. Mercury is at inferior conjunction on Monday, becoming visible in the morning sky next week, while Venus and Jupiter are moving toward a southwestern rendezvous in two weeks. Saturn remains in good position for suppertime observing and sets around 8:30 pm. Mars rises at 5 am above the bright star Spica. The North Taurid meteor shower peaks this Tuesday. Although the Taurids are not plentiful, they tend to be bright.

The Fredericton Astronomy Club meets in the UNB Forestry-Earth Sciences building at 7 pm this Tuesday, and RASC, the provincial astronomy club, meets in the same location at 1 pm on November 16. All are welcome.

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.


nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton


WHITE-TAILED DEER. NOV 7, 2019.  ALDO DORIO

WHITE-TAILED DEER. NOV 7, 2019.  ALDO DORIO

CANADA JAY SITE AT IRISHTOWN NATURE PARK

Mars_Spica

Thursday, 7 November 2019

Nov 7 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, Thursday November 07, 2019
To view the photos mentioned in this edition go tohttp://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the info line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website atwww.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Catherine Johnson  johnson2@xplornet.com 
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


***Annette Stone spotted 2 CANADA JAYS while walking an Irishtown Park trail on Tuesday.  She spoke to Jean-Guy Goguen who said he had seen 4 together earlier in the day.  
Nice to know this forest bird has chosen Irishtown Park where hopefully they will linger so more folks can see Canada's national bird symbol.  


***While moving a bird feeder pole on Tuesday, a MOURNING CLOAK BUTTERFLY suddenly appeared for Louise Nichols. It was slowly flapping wings, not seemingly to be in flying mode in the cold wind.  It appeared to be fairly fresh, showing little wing wear.  
This butterfly overwinters as an adult by just closing its wings on tree bark. The underwing pattern gives it amazing camouflage.  Their amazing antifreeze ability will allow them to fly on very warm winter days and are ready to fly as spring warmth appears to continue their mission.  

***The NB  Birds Records Committee met this past weekend in Saint John and issued an invitation to anyone interested to attend as an observer.  Long-time active birder Ron Steeves accepted that invitation and leaves his thoughts as an observer.  
"The committee consists of chairman Jim Wilson, Roger Leblanc, Stu Tingley, Gilles Belliveau, Dave Christie, Don McAlpine and Richard Blacquiere.  
As many probably saw the statement issued by Jim Wilson regarding the acceptance of WILD TURKEY be added to the New Brunswick birding list and the locations in the province that are most likely to be of the wild genus. 
The presentation for discussion about Wild Turkey was put forward by Jim and it was outstanding the amount of facts, figures, and reports that he had accumulated from Maine and the five counties bordering the state of Maine. Ron comments that it was gratifying to observe this committee, with their professionalism, enthusiasm and caution pertaining to such matters. 
These folks are all volunteers and should be truly appreciated by all of us for the work they do."  
Thank you Ron for sharing your comments with the rest of us to let us understand how important this Committee really is.  

***On a visit on Monday to the Chartersville ponds/marsh, (just off Louis St in Dieppe) gave Georges Brun the chance to see quite a large flock of waterfowl.  The estimated number to be approximately 350 to 375 birds either resting or feeding. 
There were a notable number of NORTHERN PINTAIL, NORTHERN SHOVELERS, some GREEN-WINGED TEAL, MALLARDS and others too far for him to identify.   
Georges sends photos of two rafts, one was in the southern part of the pond, the other in the north-east end, and both seemed to be trying to snooze as if they had arrived from a long journey.  
The photos seem to show the pintails nearing breeding plumage with the pin tail up to half what they soon will be and some Northern Shovelers that may be still seem to be moulting out of eclipse plumage or possibly young-of-the-year-birds.  

***Leon Gagnon had a young-of-the-year GREAT BLUE HERON stay in his Wilson Point Miscou yard for several days in mid-September, as well as the yard of a neighbour. It would retire for the night in nearby trees and back faithfully the next day.  Leon's photos show the black crown of the juvenile Great Blue Heron, the bicoloured bill and reduced visible rufous in the thigh area so apparent in the adult standing bird or in flight. A pleasant yard visitor for sure.

Barb Brown shares her experience planting some of the non-native trees mentioned in yesterday’s edition in her near Ayer’s Lake home yard. Barb bought a Tulip Tree at “Canadian Tire” in Woodstock 2 years ago—a fairly large sapling about 6ft tall.  It did well the first winter but suffered a bit of twig damage last winter.  It appears to be planning to “hang in there” as long as our winter isn’t too severe with a lot of abrupt freeze-thaw cycles.
She has quite a few Hickories as well, grown from nuts collected on Ile Perrot, just off Montreal Island where they are native (Shagbark as well as Bitternut).  She also has seedlings from White Oak acorns collected in the same location.  The Hickories are having mixed success, with those planted in her vegetable garden doing the best.  Her Bitternut is 5 years old now and still only 3in. tall!  They are all surviving however so Barb thinks it is well worthwhile to at least try to grow them in NB.  She has also had a lot of success here with Blue Beech (Carpinus caroliniana).  Her sapling, grown from a seedling, produced seed of its own this year, for the first time.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton



MOURNING CLOAK BUTTERFLY. NOV. 6, 2019. LOUISE NICHOLS

GREAT BLUE HERON (JUVENILE). SEPT 12, 2019.  LEON GAGNON

GREAT BLUE HERON (JUVENILE). SEPT 12, 2019.  LEON GAGNON

GREAT BLUE HERON (JUVENILE). SEPT 12, 2019.  LEON GAGNON

NORTHERN PINTAIL AND NORTHERN SHOVELER. NOV 5 2019  GEORGES BRUN

NORTHERN PINTAIL AND NORTHERN SHOVELER. NOV 5 2019  GEORGES BRUN

WATERFOWL RAFT NOV 5 2019 GEORGES BRUN

WATERFOWL RAFT NOV 5 2019 GEORGES BRUN