Sunday, 20 January 2019

Jan 20 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, 20 January 2019 (Sunday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to


To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, .

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the info line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records consult the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at


Edited by: Nelson Poirier 
Transcript by: David Christie 
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** A BROWN CREEPER [Grimpereau brun] is always a welcome yard visitor. Louise Nichols had one come to her Sackville deck on Saturday. She did not see it take anything but it seemed to be investigating one of the bird pie preparations that is marketed in orange mesh bags. Louise was yet another to have a visit from a small flock of COMMON REDPOLLS [Sizerin flammé] on Friday. They may be in small numbers but are starting to check out feeders. My flock of one has not increased but is regular!

** Lois Budd is pleased to join the now select group of bird feeder yards starting to get COMMON REDPOLLS. She had three drop by her near Salisbury yard last Tuesday and got a few photos of them as they seemed to want to play peek-a-boo.

** Jamie Burris had a new arrival at 11:30, Saturday morning, when a NORTHERN SHRIKE [Pie-grieche grise] arrived and landed on the deck but sprinted off too quickly for a photo. It is a bit surprising the number of reports of shrikes at feeders. They seem to be as commonly reported as raptors this year.

** Little Ray's Traveling Zoo has been visiting Maritime sites. Pat and I had a chance to drop by, something we always enjoy very much. Their methods, messages, and care of their animals is commendable. Many of the mammals, birds and reptiles they use are rehabilitated individuals not suitable for wild release. They also have a domestic animal petting/feeding area that is a magnet for the public to appreciate animals. Pat and a CAMEL [Chameau] traveling with the troupe took a real fancy for one another.

This traveling show is approved by CAZA (Canadian Association of Zoos and Aquariums) and has to undergo strict regular checks to keep that approval.

The GREAT HORNED OWL [Grand-duc d'Amérique] in the attached photo had a wing injury, making it unreleasable, giving the public an opportunity to see this raptor up close, along with a presentation of its life and times that make the public more aware of something they don't often get the opportunity to.



Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton


 
BROWN CREEPER. LOUISE NICHOLS. JAN 19, 2019

CAMEL AND PAT. JAN 19, 2019.  NELSON POIRIER

COMMON REDPOLLS. JAN 19, 2019.  LOIS BUDD

COMMON REDPOLLS. JAN 19, 2019.  LOIS BUDD

GREAT HORNED OWL. JAN 19, 2019.  NELSON POIRIER

GREAT HORNED OWL. JAN 19, 2019.  NELSON POIRIER

Saturday, 19 January 2019

Jan 19 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 19, 2019 (Saturday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

Please advise editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at
www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com.

** It’s that time of year when BOBCATS [Lynx roux] are unceremoniously sending their young-of-the-year off on their own.  On Monday Jan. 14th, Dave Christie spotted a Bobcat on Mary’s Pt. Road at 2:00 pm in the afternoon, lying in the snow sunning itself across from the Lars Larson Marsh.  Dave comments it’s one of the few chances he has had to get a chance to have one stay in one spot long enough to get a photograph.  It is the best time of year to see a Bobcat during the day as the young are hungry, and not adult savvy as yet, and not so nocturnal.  Note the ‘spaniel-style’ posture, shorter legs, and smaller foot pad than a Lynx.  And also, one photograph shows the black spot just on top of the tip of the bobbed tail whereas a Lynx would have a completely black-tipped over-and-under tail tip.

** Jules Cormier leaves an activity report from his always active feeder yard on the side hill of his Memramcook home, across from the Credit Union.  He has 30 species now that are daily regulars.  Some of the species of note are one BROWN CREEPER [Grimpereau brun], one SAVANNAH SPARROW [Bruant des prés], 3 SONG SPARROWS [Bruant chanteur], 3 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS [Bruant à gorge blanche], 4 COMMON REDPOLLS [Sizerin flammé], one WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH [Sittelle à poitrine blanche], 30+ PINE SISKINS [Tarin des pins] with lots of AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune], several AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS [Bruant hudsonien] and the other expected regulars.  He did see a RIVER OTTER [Loutre de rivière] in the Memramcook valley on Thursday.  He has noted 3 COYOTES [Coyote] in the area, one with a damaged leg.  He visited the Tantramar Marsh in the latter afternoon recently to find it very quiet.

** John Filliter points out the availability of some Audubon courses on DVDs at excellent prices that may interest many.  Their website is www.watchgreatcourses.com and toll-free number to order via credit card is 1-800-832-2412.  The 12 hours of DVDs on the National Geographic Guide entitled “Discover the Wonders of Birding (in North America)” are a cost of $34.95 US and includes 24 half-hour lectures by birding expert James Curry plus a 248-page course synopsis.  John recommends it highly.

** Brian Stone noticed an interesting sun pillar event on Friday.  There was an upper and less-frequently seen lower sun pillar with lots of cloud iridescence around it.  There was also a nice sun dog to the left, but his bus came along before he had a chance to capture a photo of it.  Brian leaves a few sites to read more about sun pillars and halos.  Check them out below.




nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
BOBCAT. JAN 14, 2019. DAVID CHRISTIE

BOBCAT. JAN 14, 2019. DAVID CHRISTIE

UPPER AND LOWER SUN PILLAR. JAN. 18, 2019. BRIAN STONE

Friday, 18 January 2019

Jan 18 2019





NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, 18 January 2019 (Friday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the info line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

**Carmella Melanson demonstrates some evidence of how efficient raptors are at using every bit of their prey. One of Carmella’s photos shows an immature SHARP-SHINNED HAWK [Épervier brun] working on its STARLING [Étourneau] prey. The photo of the scene after shows everything used except feathers and a leg, with nothing gone to waste. The vertical breast striping and yellow eye of the Sharp-shinned Hawk indicate immaturity.

**Our new webmaster, Brian Stone, has done a yeoman’s job of getting the Nature Moncton website updated. Everyone is encouraged to go to www.naturemoncton.com now and review events coming up, like the bird feeder tour scheduled on Saturday, January 26th, a GULL [Goéland] workshop and outing on February 16th, and meeting presentations for February, March, and May. More are about to be added soon, so it is now time to get in the habit of checking it often, which can be done every day you wish by checking on the highlighted website at the start of the Nature Moncton mail-out. Also, a reminder that the Nature Moncton daily BlogSpot can be accessed directly from the website by clicking on INFO LINE / BLOG. The website will continue to be improved to make it as user-friendly as possible.

**A note that the MASON BEE [Abeille maçonne] houses and accompanying emerger units have all gone to homes, to provide for more pollinating bees in 20 yards next spring. Any group interested in participating in this project can get the promotion by a purchase of 24 nest units at one time. Twelve emerger-cleaner units were ordered at the same time, all at half retail price. The emerger units can be shared among people, as the nest boxes are suggested to be cleaned every 2 to 3 years.

*This week’s Sky at a Glance is added to this edition courtesy of sky guru Curt Nason. Curt describes the LUNAR ECLIPSE [Éclipse lunaire] to happen on Sunday night, if Mother Nature does not stop us from appreciating it, with the potential storm forecast.

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, 2019 January 19 – January 26
At the mercy of the weather, night-owl stargazers could be treated to a lunar eclipse beginning late Sunday evening. This is our first lunar eclipse since the Harvest Moon eclipse in September 2015, and we won’t get another until a deep partial eclipse in November 2021 and a total one in May 2022.

Although the Moon starts slipping into Earth’s dark shadow at 11:34 pm, look for subtle gray shading on the lunar surface beginning a half hour sooner. This is the penumbra, a lesser shadow created when Earth partly covers the Sun as seen from the Moon. From 11:34 pm to 12:41am the dark umbra will creep across the lunar surface toward totality. Note that the umbra appears on the left side, which indicates the Moon is moving eastward in its orbit rather than the westward motion we see as our planet rotates. Also, note the curvature of the shadow. Aristotle noticed this in the fourth century BC and correctly assumed it was because the Earth is spherical. Watch for more stars to appear as totality approaches and the sky darkens. The Beehive star cluster, also called the Praesepe and M44, will be just to the east of the Moon.

Totality lasts for 62 minutes, ending at 1:43 am. The Moon could take on a red or orange hue during totality, caused by our atmosphere acting like a lens and bending the red part of the sunlight moonward. Blue light is scattered more, right across our sky, which is why we see that colour on a clear day. You might also note that the top of the Moon is brighter than the bottom. The Moon passes above the centre of Earth’s shadow during this eclipse, so the top portion is farther from the deepest and darkest part of the umbra. From 1:43 you get to watch the partial phase play out in reverse over 67 minutes, followed by the fading of the penumbra.

Weather permitting, telescopes will be set up at Saints Rest Beach in Saint John and a live feed of the eclipse through a telescope will be broadcast via the Facebook page astrobythebay. The Physics and Astronomy Department at the Université de Moncton plans to host a talk and eclipse observing. Attendance is limited but the tickets are free.

This Week in the Solar System  
Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 7:54 am and sunset will occur at 5:05 pm, giving 9 hours, 11 minutes of daylight (7:57 am and 5:12 pm in Saint John). Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 7:48 am and set at 5:15 pm, giving 9 hours, 27 minutes of daylight (7:51 am and 5:22 pm in Saint John).

The Moon is full and somewhat brick-coloured very early on Monday morning, the traditional Wolf Moon and the Mi’gmaw Tom Cod Moon. The two brightest planets make a striking pair in the morning sky; with Venus being a binocular width above Jupiter on Saturday and about the same distance to the left of Jupiter by next Saturday. Saturn might be spotted in twilight a hand span to their lower left. Mars resembles a first magnitude red star in the southwest during the evening.

RASC NB, the provincial astronomy club, meets in the Rockwood Park Interpretation Centre on January 19 at 1 pm. All are welcome.

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
Eclipse by Beeive


EUROPEAN STARLING REMAINS Jan 15 2019 CARMELLA MELANSON

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK Jan 16 2019 CARMELLA MELANSON

Thursday, 17 January 2019

Jan 17 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 17, 2019 (Thursday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** There hasn’t been much about it on the airwaves in New Brunswick but a tropical hawk, a GREAT BLACK HAWK, has been bringing birders flocking for an audience with it in Maine. That included Rick Elliot and Barb Curlew who made a pilgrimage to Portland, Maine on Tuesday and were very pleased to be directed right to it by local birder John Berry. They got a photo of their own which is attached. The bird was approximately 100 ft.from where they parked their car. This hawk is a native to Central and South America which normally does not leave its tropical home. It was first spotted in Biddeford, Maine in August and it appears to be the same bird that was spotted on South Padre Island in Texas last spring. It is an immature bird. It has ventured far out of its home turf. The weather is cool in Portland, Maine like it is in south eastern New Brunswick so never say never. Keep a close eye out for a different looking hawk and thanks to Rick and Barb for sharing their experience.

** It has been a different year at feeders for Common Redpoll drop-ins with several feeders having the odd one drop by, not in flocks. It was our turn on Wednesday when one, lone COMMON REDPOLL [Sizerin flammé] dropped by, seemingly traveling alone. It went right to the niger seed feeder and fed for some time, peeking out from the back of the feeder to show its red beret, dark moustache and rouge on its chest.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton



 
COMMON REDPOLL. JAN 16, 2019.  NELSON POIRIER

COMMON REDPOLL. JAN 16, 2019.  NELSON POIRIER

GREAT BLACK HAWK (IMMATURE). JAN 15,2019. RICK ELLIOT


Wednesday, 16 January 2019

Jan 16 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 16 2019 (Wednesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com. Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com.
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com.
Transcript by: Judy Marsh   marshj@nbnet.nb.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397"(384-NEWS)

** Nature Moncton Members night on Tuesday evening turned out to be a very well received event. Roger LeBlanc gave an interesting account of monitoring his trail of over a dozen NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL [Petite nyctale] boxes and interactions he has had with one Saw-Whet owl patron for sure as well as  FLYING SQUIRREL [Grand polatouche] and RED SQUIRREL [Ecureuil roux) patrons.
** Fred Richards gave an account of an excellent winter and summer response he gets to a suet cake mixture he uses, which we will try and photograph the receipe  and place it on the BlogSpot.
** Brian Stone introduced folks  to the small world of insects, snakes, spiders, ticks, lady beetles and more he had successfully photographed.
**Nelson Poirier's introduction to a new Mason Bee box will mean twenty more yards will be welcoming Mason bee structures this coming spring. For more information on these nests and the emergence chamber for clean out visit www.pollenbeenest.com
We were able to order 24 nest units @$12 and 12 emergence chambers at $13.80 via Nature Moncton. A few are still available.

**Some feeder yards  may be quiet, but others are booming. Sarah Chouninard- Horne leaves a report from her yard  in Willow Grove,  located ten minutes past the Saint John Airport towards St. Martins. She has 75-100 EVENING GROSBEAK [Gros-bec errant] devouring Black Oil Sunflower seed from three different platforms. They have been regular for six weeks. AMERICAN TREE SPARROW [Bruant hudsonien],SONG SPARROW [Bruant chanteur], and WHITE-THROATED SPARROW [Bruant à gorge blanche] now visit daily.Recently PINE SISKIN [Tarin des pins] have appeared as well as two CANADA JAYS [Mésangeai du Canada] for the first ever visit. They are coming to suet nuggets that Sarah makes up and also Black Oil Sunflower seed. A BROWN CREEPER [Grimpereau brun] comes to the yard to glean insects from an apple tree and she sees it checking out other trees, but not to any set out food items as yet. Several other expected regulars round up the diversity of patrons. Sarah comments she enjoys her feathered friends very very much.

**Mac Wilmot still has his  female RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER [Pic à ventre roux] as a regular to his Lower Coverdale yard. It has become very attracted to a home made suet cake mix  that is simply made from melted  down raw suet kernels blended with oatmeal. We are hoping Mac's lady and my gentleman will find each other as spring approaches as the distance apart, via bird flight is really quite close.

** A note from Leigh Eaton who is in Florida comments  that he sees the news reports from Moncton that indicate that winter  is in full control and unfortunately Leigh, this is not fake news! Leigh, however comments that Florida is unseasonably cold at the moment as well . But he does notice each year at this time migration is really getting underway. Where they are in Indian River, there have been AMERICAN ROBIN [Merle d'Amérique] and  COMMON GRACKLE [Quiscale bronzé] arriving to their yard, some of our first returns , we can expect to arrive here in a few months. For the past several days, their yard has been inundated with Robins, several hundred at any one time and are decending on his bird bath. It may be difficult to appreciate, but the birds are on the way, just as Leigh will be  in a few months.
** The BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS [Jaseur boréal] are continuing to circulate about the city. They do appear to be less in number this year even though there is an abundant supply of untapped clinging crabapple friut. Brian Stone spotted a small flock on the Gorge Road on Tuesday to get some quick documentary photos, as they moved from site to site.

Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton


 
BIRD PIE BLEND. FRED RICHARDS.

BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS.  JAN. 15, 2019. BRIAN STONE

EVENING GROSBEAKS. JAN 15, 2019. SARAH CHOUINARD-HORNE

MASON BEE NEST (PURCHASED-FRONT VIEW WITH STICKY GUARDS). MAY 9, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

MASON BEE NEST (PURCHASED-TOP VIEW). MAY 9, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

MASON BEE NEST WITH EMERGENCE CHAMBER  ATTACHED FOR CLEANING . NELSON POIRIER

MASON BEE NEST WITH EMERGENCE CHAMBER  ATTACHED FOR CLEANING. . NELSON POIRIER

Tuesday, 15 January 2019

Jan 15 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 15, 2019 (Tuesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Brian Coyle is reporting good activity at his Lower Mountain Rd. feeder yard in spite of the daily visits of a raptor that often is successful. A flock of approximately twenty EVENING GROSBEAKS [Gros-bec errant] is regular, a female NORTHERN CARDINAL [Cardinal rouge] continues to be a regular that has been coming to his yard since November 20th and one BROWN CREEPER [Grimpereau brun] along with a nice diversity of expected regulars. Brian comments that the patrons that are enjoying peanut butter include BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES [Mésange à tête noire], BLUE JAYS [Geai bleu], WOODPECKERS, RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES [Sittelle à poitrine rousse], DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoisé] and even the Cardinal.
Brian also includes a photo of a coyote trail. Note there is starting to show a foot drag mark in the trail with the deeper snow.

** Heather Silliker reports that they saw six RED-TAILED HAWKS [Buse à queue rousse] in the sky at one time last week over the Salisbury Waste Treatment Facility across the river from their Upper Coverdale home. The Hawks were in two groups of three, diving and interacting in flight. She watched them for a few minutes but since then she has not seen a repeat show. Heather and Pat will be traveling to Portugal for a few weeks and wonder if anyone could recommend a bird field guide for Portugal. If anyone can advise, please email Heather at heatherart149@gmail.com.

** Common Redpolls are still scarce at feeder yards but still the odd ones keep showing up at some yards. Aldo Dorio had one, lone COMMON REDPOLL [Sizerin flammé] become a patron at his Neguac feeder yard along with one, lone PINE SISKIN [Tarin des pins].

** The Nature Moncton January meeting is on for tonight, Tuesday, January 15th, at 7:00 pm at the Mapleton Rotary Lodge with it being “Member’s Night”, the variety night of the year. Presentations lined up at the moment include Roger Leblanc on his experiences with Saw-whet Owl nesting boxes, Fred Richards on bird pie feeder experience, Brian Stone on “It’s a Small World” showing some of his photos of the very small members of Mother Nature’s community and Nelson Poirier will give a presentation on his experience with Mason Bee housing with a new one out that he strongly recommends.

The write up for the evening is attached below.

Nature Moncton January, 2019 meeting
January 15, 2019 at 7:00 PM
Moncton Rotary Lodge (across from former Cabela’s)
Members Night

Have you had an interesting encounter with nature in the past year?  Have you taken some good photos of birds, insects, animals or anything else in the various habitats of New Brunswick?  Have you taken a trip where you were able to experience aspects of nature different from what we have here?  The January Nature Moncton meeting belongs to members like you who wish to share their nature photos and experiences in 15 to 30 minute presentations.   It’s a special night when we get to hear from each other and perhaps learn some things from the everyday experiences of the nature enthusiasts who belong to the club.
Please advise President Gordon Rattray if you have a presentation to share at gordonr@nbnet.nb.ca or call Gordon at 874-6458, so we can line up the evening.
Nature Moncton is a very diverse group with an equal diversity of interests. Let’s share them on January 15, 2019!
As always, all are welcome Nature Moncton member or not.
   


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton



 
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. JANUARY 12, 2019. BRIAN COYLE

COMMON REDPOLL. JAN 14, 2019.  ALDO DORIO

COMMON REDPOLL. JAN 14, 2019.  ALDO DORIO

COYOTE TRAIL. JANUARY 12, 2019. BRIAN COYLE

EVENING GROSBEAKS (MALE). JANUARY 12, 2019. BRIAN COYLE

FIND THE WOOD DUCK. JAN. 14, 2019. BRIAN STONE

FIND THE WOOD DUCK. JAN. 14, 2019. BRIAN STONE

HAIRY WOODPECKER. JANUARY 12, 2019. BRIAN COYLE

NORTHERN CARDINAL (FEMALE). JANUARY 12, 2019. BRIAN COYLE

PINE SISKIN. JAN 14, 2019.  ALDO DORIO

Monday, 14 January 2019

Jan 14 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, 14 January 2019 (Monday)


To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to


To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, .

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that *corrections, deletions, or delayed additions* may not always appear on the info line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at .


Edited by: Nelson Poirier 
Transcript by: David Christie 
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Jamie Burris had a flock of ten Bohemian Waxwings [Jaseur boreal] arrive in his Riverview yard on Sunday. They were attracted to Bittersweet Nightshade [Morelle Doucet-a mere] berries, which are clinging to a vine on a back fence. Jamie comments that this is the only species that he has ever seen foraging on these berries. They are classed as toxic to humans although I have not heard reports of poisoning from this commonly occurring berry. We had photos of House Finch [Roselin familier] feeding on this berry in the past.

Jamie reports that this year they have a record number of DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoise] as regular patrons, numbering 11. He also says that woodpecker numbers are higher than normal. However, the only sparrow he has right now is a lone SONG SPARROW [Bruant chanteur].

** Daryl Doucet reports that he had a surprising number of MOURNING DOVES [Tourterelle triste], numbering 48 at one time in his Moncton yard on Sunday. He was amused at a HAIRY WOODPECKER [Pic chevelu] that decided the number was just too high and decided to put the beak to them, which it successfully did even though the doves held their ground to the last moment.

** Brian Stone captured some striking photos of a SUN PILLAR as it formed and disappeared over several minutes Sunday afternoon. A sun pillar is a vertical shaft of light, extending upward or downward from the sun that forms when sunlight reflects off the surfaces of falling ice crystals associated with thin, high level cloud. This phenomenon seldom lasts very long. It is typically seen during sunrise or sunset, when conditions are right.

Brian also photographed a Belted Galloway cow that was part of a herd at a farm in McNairn. We don’t often see this breed in NB, the black cow with a white belt that totally wraps around the mid-section of the body. The Belted Galloway are beef cattle, not milking cows.

** The Nature Moncton January meeting is on for tomorrow, Tuesday night, Jan. 15, at 7 o'clock at the Moncton Rotary Lodge.
It is members' night, the variety night of the year.

Presentations lined up at the moment include Roger LeBlanc on experiences with Saw-whet Owl nest boxes, Fred Richards on bird-pie feeder experience, Brian Stone on "it's a small world" showing photos of some very small members of Mother Nature's community, and Nelson Poirier will give a presentation on experience with Mason Bee housing, with a new and out he very strongly recommends. The write-up for the evening is attached below.

Nature Moncton January, 2019 meeting
January 15, 2019 at 7:00 PM
Moncton Rotary Lodge (across from former Cabela’s)
Members Night

Have you had an interesting encounter with nature in the past year?  Have you taken some good photos of birds, insects, animals or anything else in the various habitats of New Brunswick?  Have you taken a trip where you were able to experience aspects of nature different from what we have here?  The January Nature Moncton meeting belongs to members like you who wish to share their nature photos and experiences in 15 to 30 minute presentations.   It’s a special night when we get to hear from each other and perhaps learn some things from the everyday experiences of the nature enthusiasts who belong to the club.
Please advise President Gordon Rattray if you have a presentation to share at gordonr@nbnet.nb.ca or call Gordon at 874-6458, so we can line up the evening.
Nature Moncton is a very diverse group with an equal diversity of interests. Let’s share them on January 15, 2019!
As always, all are welcome Nature Moncton member or not.




Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton


 
BELTED GALLOWAY COW. JAN. 13, 2019. BRIAN STONE

BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS JAN 11 2019 JAMIE BURRIS

DARK-EYED JUNCO JAN 13 2019 JAMIE BURRIS

SONG SPARROW JAN 13 2019 JAMIE BURRIS

SUN PILLAR. JAN. 13, 2019. BRIAN STONE

SUN PILLAR. JAN. 13, 2019. BRIAN STONE

SUN PILLAR. JAN. 13, 2019. BRIAN STONE