Wednesday, 26 January 2022

Jan 26 2022


NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

 Jan 26, 2022 (Tuesday)

 

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Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

 

 

 ** Georges Brun reports it appears that 3 Short-Eared Owls are roosting in the birch and aspen trees not far from the Trans-Aqua outlet into the Petitcodiac River on the Riverview Marsh.  He knows that 1 Short-Eared Owl was flying behind them but not sure if there were 4 birds.  The photos are over a Km distant and are thus documentary. (Editors note: one would wonder where the marauding crows were).

Georges also saw 2 Red Foxes on the Riverview Marsh and a lone one in the Chartersville area.

This is mating time for the Red Fox making for a higher chance of seeing 2 animals together.

 

 Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

                                                                                           

 

SHORT-EARED OWLS. JAN. 23, 2022. GEORGES BRUN

SHORT-EARED OWLS. JAN. 23, 2022. GEORGES BRUN

SHORT-EARED OWLS. JAN. 23, 2022. GEORGES BRUN

RED FOXES. JAN. 23, 2022. GEORGES BRUN

RED FOX. JAN. 23, 2022. GEORGES BRUN

 

Tuesday, 25 January 2022

Jan 25 2022

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

 Jan 25, 2022 (Tuesday)

 

 

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Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

 

** Ed and Jane LeBlanc in St. Martins still have 4 sparrow species in their  yard. (Tree, Song, White-throated and Junco).

 

Jane leaves a pleasant account of their day’s nature sleuthing on Monday.

“They decided it was too nice a day to waste staying home, so they drove to the Riverview Marsh, hoping to see.... something...anything. 

A female RING NECKED PHEASANT was the first to cross paths with them but didn't stop for photos. Then, a flock of SNOW BUNTINGS flew over. Again, no photo. Near the end of the trail near the outflow, they spotted a distant RED FOX. Jane took photos, but none good enough to share. Ed saw a total of 3 Red Foxes with binoculars.

They then drove to the parking lot next to Chateau Moncton and enjoyed their picnic lunch sitting in the warm car. They took a short walk and spotted 2 Red Foxes across the river hunting, but between the distance and direct sun in their eyes, again, no photos.

They stopped for a short walk on the Wilson marsh on their way home. 

Not a single photo on the day, but a beautiful day to be out none the less, with sun, not terribly cold temperatures and no wind. 

We need to enjoy days like these, as who knows what Mother Nature will throw at us in future!!”

 

**Georges Brun spotted a large flock of Snow Buntings wheeling about the Riverview marsh on Monday. He estimated 300+ birds and was able to capture some documentary photos. A large flock of Snow Buntings in winter can be reminiscent of our summer shorebird flocks. The Riverview March grasses must be laden with nutrition packed winter clinging seeds.

 

** Brian and Annette Stone walked some trails in the White Rock Recreational Area on Monday and Brian had a bit more luck with the birds this time, mostly due to Annette's excellent spotting ability. A large percentage of the trees in the park are very tall and so it meant that most of the birds seen were quite high up in the tops but the bright, clear light helped Brian get some decent images. His photographs shared include some of 8 PINE SISKINS, approximately 26 AMERICAN ROBINS, 8 PURPLE FINCHES, 6 RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES, and 4 HAIRY WOODPECKERS.

 

Birds seen but not photographed include several RAVENS and BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES. Brian also photographed several sets of small tracks in the new snow that might be Weasel\Mink and Shrew. Brian also includes a photo of the park map with his route outlined in red.

 

 On his way to the White Rock area Brian had to stop short on the Hillsborough Rd. (Route 114) as it entered the main section of Hillsborough at the top of a hill to avoid a collision with one of the 8 WHITE-TAILED DEER that were milling about in and beside the road. Road salt may have been the attraction.

 

Some plants were still showing a nice green under the water at the edge of the brook in the park. Likely they were above water in the summer. A consult with Gart Bishop gave the identity and some explanation as quoted below:

“There are very few plants that plug up a water course (usually ditch or slow-moving stream) as indicated in Brian's photo besides Watercress (Nasturtium officinale).  If you closely examine the photo, you can see a few of the compound leaves exhibiting the large terminal leaflets which get progressively smaller as you look down toward where it fastens to the plant stem. This is an edible plant (doesn’t look appetizing in the photo at this time of the year) which has been brought over from Europe.”

 

 Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

                                                                                           

 

WATERCRESS (NASTURTIUM OFFICINALE). JAN. 24, 2022. BRIAN STONE

SNOW BUNTINGS. JAN 24, 2022. GEORGES BRUN



SNOW BUNTINGS. JAN 24, 2022. GEORGES BRUN

SNOW BUNTINGS. JAN 24, 2022. GEORGES BRUN

SNOW BUNTINGS. JAN 24, 2022. GEORGES BRUN

SONG SPARROW. JAN. 23, 2022. JANE LEBLANC

PINE SISKIN. JAN. 24, 2022. BRIAN STONE

PURPLE FINCH (MALE). JAN. 24, 2022. BRIAN STONE

PURPLE FINCH (FEMALE). JAN. 24, 2022. BRIAN STONE

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH. JAN. 24, 2022. BRIAN STONE

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH. JAN. 24, 2022. BRIAN STONE

HAIRY WOODPECKER (MALE). JAN. 24, 2022. BRIAN STONE

HAIRY WOODPECKER (MALE). JAN. 24, 2022. BRIAN STONE

HAIRY WOODPECKER (MALE). JAN. 24, 2022. BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN ROBIN. JAN. 24, 2022. BRIAN STONE

WHITE ROCK RECREATIONAL AREA MAP. JAN. 24, 2022. BRIAN STONE

TRACKS. (MINK OR WEASEL SUSPECTED) JAN. 24, 2022. BRIAN STONE

SHREW OR VOLE TRAIL. JAN. 24, 2022.  BRIAN STONE


SHREW OR VOLE TRAIL. JAN. 24, 2022.  BRIAN STONE



 

Monday, 24 January 2022

Jan 24 2022

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

 Jan 24, 2022 (Monday)

 

 To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

 ** Georges Brun comments sometimes when you continue to follow a subject, interesting scenarios may happen! He was following a Bald Eagle chasing a hundred plus gulls, then the next thing, he sees it chasing what appeared to be a Rock Pigeon. Looking at the photos on his computer, it was a Peregrine Falcon.  Since the opening of the new bridge, he has seen one Peregrine Falcon roosting on electrical lines in the marsh (northeast side).  Again, looking at his photos, sure enough the Peregrine Falcon was not too far from the snow dump roosting on the electrical wires.  Quite sure that both Peregrine Falcons were flying at the time of the Bald Eagle incident.  A few barrel rolls that you seldom see along with the chase.

 

**With necessary updates to Nature Moncton Nature News that have had to take place, we don’t often get the interesting updates we used to from the bellwether feeder yard of Doreen Rossiter in Alma as she is not Wi-Fi connected.

Fortunately, her daughter Kathie Carter can pass on Doreen’s updates, one of which follows:

Mom asked me to send in a feeder report for her. She has 3 White-throated Sparrows, 2 American Tree Sparrows, 2 Song Sparrows, 40+ Dark-eyed Juncos and on Thursday a Fox Sparrow appeared. A male Ring-necked Pheasant strolls into the yard when the mood hits him. It can be weeks or hours between visits. There are both Hairy & Downey Woodpeckers making visits along with Black-capped chickadees and a Red Breasted Nuthatch. The Mourning Doves come and go as do the Pigeons(21 of them}. Lately the yard has only been a fly through zone for the Pigeons. They were late showing up this year, but she now has roughly 20 American Goldfinch and approximately a dozen Purple Finch. The Carolina Wren which appeared Dec. 5th is still in the area. It showed up again Dec.15th and made a return visit last Monday Jan.17th always to the same feeder.

 

**Jane Wood had a visit from a Pine Warbler to her Riverview feeder yard on Sunday. It went to a suet blend and peanut butter. She noted it as slightly larger than an American Goldfinch, but much rounder. Jane was able to get some quick through the window photos before it was just scared off by a woodpecker competing for the peanut butter.

 

**Judith Dewar shares some interesting photos from her Fredericton site. A Porcupine has chosen an overturned barrel to serve just fine as a winter den, which porcupines tend to use as their latrine as well.

Judith also got a nice photo of scat pile of a Ruffed Grouse. The scat of the Ruffed Grouse is brown due to its winter diet of tree buds and shows the white urates with scats in the typical tubular shape of the grouse. The scats of the Spruce Grouse are easily distinguished as they are green due to their conifer needle diet.

 

**On Sunday January 23, Suzanne and Yves Poussart went out for a drive along the coast. A stop was made near the bridge in Bouctouche (the one facing the church), Yves observed and photographed a group of about 50 individuals of GOLDENEYES (mainly BARROW'S, ; Garrots d'Islande) which were in a zone of open water under the bridge. Some COMMON MERGANSERS (Grand harle) and a few COMMON GOLDENEYES (Garrots à œil d'or) were also present. Among the BARROW'S GOLDENEYES, adult males and first winter males were part of the group. 

 

On Saturday January 22, a stop at the Foch Bridge in Shediac provided an opportunity of getting some photos of BARROW'S and COMMON GOLDENEYES (Garrots d'Islande et à œil d'or) which were quite active in diving for food. Doing so, they were closely watched by a gull. As soon as the duck was back at the surface the gull was activey harrassing it to try to steal the collected food. 

Yves has not been able to identify what kind of prey had been captured but the duck but it was clearly chewing some food for about 10 seconds. Other usual species were relaxing. 

Typical photos of these scenes are attached.

 

On another topic, here are some comments about the observation of blue snow reported.

While the solar light in full sun is white with its full visible spectrum, photos of snow taken in the shade often show a bluish tint. This is caused by the fact that snow absorbs some wavelengths in the red-yellow part of the spectrum and that the reflected light captured by the camera gets the image with a more or less component of blue light. The same situation often happens with photos over open water. This physical reality is often discussed in books and papers dedicated to 

photography. On the Internet, a search on '' what causes blue snow '' will provide many simple or more elaborate answers on the topic. On a camera, a selection on an appropriate type of white balance can prevent the capture of a bluish image. Otherwise, it can easily be compensated during the postprocessing of an image file.

 

 

 

Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

                                                                                           

 

                                                                                           

BARROW'S GOLDENEYE (PAIR). JAN. 22, 2022. YVES POUSSART

COMMON GOLDENEYE (MALES). JAN. 22, 2022. YVES POUSSART

BARROW'S GOLDENEYE. JAN. 23, 2022. YVES POUSSART

PINE WARBLER. JAN 23, 2022.  JANE WOOD

PINE WARBLER. JAN 23, 2022.  JANE WOOD

PEREGRINE FALCONS AND BALD EAGLE. JAN 22, 2022. GEORGES BRUN

BALD EAGLE AND PEREGRINE FALCON. JAN. 22, 2022. GEORGES BRUN

PEREGRINE FALCON. JAN. 22, 2022.  GEORGES BRUN

PORCUPINE DEN. JAN 23, 2022. JUDITH DEWAR

PORCUPINE DEN. JAN 23, 2022. JUDITH DEWAR


GROUSE TRAIL. JAN 23, 2022. JUDITH DEWAR



RUFFED GROUSE SCAT. JAN 23, 2022. JUDITH DEWAR

 

Sunday, 23 January 2022

Jan 23 2022

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

 Jan 23, 2022 (Sunday)

 

 To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

 

 ** Grant Ramsey got a photo of what a Pileated Woodpecker can do to a dead tree as it forages on the insects that seek dead and dying trees. Both may be doing the job Mother Nature wants them to do by recycling the tree. However, it can be surprising how quickly a Pileated Woodpecker can work the tree it chooses. It would appear this was done very rapidly as the tailings at the bottom of the tree have not been covered by the recent snowfall.

 

**Ed and Jane LeBlanc in St. Martins heard a bird strike their window on Saturday morning. Looking out, they saw an AMERICAN GOLDFINCH lying a few feet away. Ed went out and gently picked it up, and put it next to the house, out of the wind and in the sun. It flew off a short time later. Jane also noticed a BLACK CAPPED CHICKADEE finally trying out the peanut butter she had put out a few days before. (Editors note: another method to help window strikes is to put them in a paper bag, fold over the top, and place them inside a warm room until you hear active motion in the bag and then release them outside)

 

 

**Pat Gibbs took photos of frost on her screen door and noticed that some of them show blue. She didn't do anything to artificially create that colour and the blue and white ones were all on the same door and photos taken at the same time. She thought it was a bit odd but interesting and wondered if anyone in the group knows why that would happen?

We have lots of volunteers on the consult list but no one I can think of for frost formations. Comments please.

In wait for those comments, an online search suggests Pat’s photos are Window Frost which forms when a pane of glass is exposed to below freezing temperatures on the outside and moist air on the inside. Water vapour from the air condenses as frost on the inside surface of the window. Brian’s photos are suggestive of what is called Hoarfrost which develops on objects in the outdoors when conditions are right. The photos are labelled as these 2 types of frost until corrections come in.

 

**Brian Stone walked some trails in the White Rock Recreational Area on Saturday during the clear, cold weather. The park was a joy to walk in as the trails were all groomed to be firm, flat, hard packed snow, but not slippery snow. No ice either. He did not find any bird life or other wildlife to photograph but he sends some scenery of the trails and the frost art. The first, wide main trail is open to snow mobiles so caution is advised until you make it to the walking trails which are closed to motor vehicles and are a pleasure to walk on.

A Nature Moncton Field Trip was planned to this area but had to be cancelled/postponed due to Covid-19 restrictions,

 

 

Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

                                                                                           

 

PILEATED WOODPECKER WORKINGS. JAN 22, 2022. GRANT RAMSAY

AMERICAN GOLDFINCH (RESCUED WINDOW STRIKE). JAN 22, 2022. JANE LeBLANC

BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE TO PEANUT BUTTER. JAN 22, 2022. JANE LeBLANC

WHITE ROCK RECREATIONAL AREA MAP. JAN. 22, 2022. BRIAN STONE

WHITE ROCK RECREATIONAL AREA. JAN. 22, 2022. BRIAN STONE

WHITE ROCK RECREATIONAL AREA. JAN. 22, 2022. BRIAN STONE

WINDOW FROST. JAN 22, 2022. PAT GIBBS

WINDOW FROST. JAN 22, 2022. PAT GIBBS

WINDOW FROST. JAN 22, 2022. PAT GIBBS

WINDOW FROST. JAN 22, 2022. PAT GIBBS

HOARFROST. JAN. 22, 2022.  BRIAN STONE

HOARFROST. JAN. 22, 2022.  BRIAN STONE

HOARFROST. JAN. 22, 2022.  BRIAN STONE

HOARFROST. JAN. 22, 2022.  BRIAN STONE