Friday, 15 January 2021

Jan 15 2021


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 15, 2021 (Friday)

 To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

**Sue and Steve Berube have been walking on the Riverview Marsh  this week hoping to see the owls. On Wednesday afternoon at 4:00 PM, they were able to capture some photos of a SHORT-EARED OWL being harassed by crows.
This aerial show was quite high above them, a real thrill to see. They have learned to pay attention when the crows are making a fuss. The owl escaped unscathed. These were taken on the trail in front of the water treatment plant, about halfway out to the shelter on the point.
I have often wondered why crows are so intent on harassing a 15 in. bird but seems to a crow that an owl is an owl and that's that! There seems to be a dramatic increase in the number of crows present at dusk on the marsh and expect the owls (felt to be at least 5) are not amused.

**Jim Carroll found more information on the ATLANTIC LUMPFISH we met yesterday courtesy of Alyre Chiasson in Jim's Common Loon photo. Maybe this use will cross the pond.
 Apparently, they're used in European Aquaculture as "cleaner " fish. They are turning sea lice into caviar. Check out the interesting link below:
https://www.vin.com/apputil/content/defaultadv1.aspx?id=7312380&pid=14818& <https://www.vin.com/apputil/content/defaultadv1.aspx?id=7312380&pid=14818&>

 

 

** Ray Gauvin photographed two SEALS [Phoque] on ice floes out from Pointe-du-chêne wharf on Tuesday, showing a significant difference in size.  Photos are attached.  Dr. Jack Terhune reviewed the photos, and his comments are attached below:

I think that they are two Harp Seals, a juvenile, the un-spotted one, and a young adult.  It is too early in the season for the younger seal to have been born this year and it does not have the face of a Grey Seal.  Grey Seals are born (whelp) around Christmas time.”

 

** Yolande LeBlanc shares an interesting scenario of a male NORTHERN CARDINAL [Cardinal rouge] she has as a regular.  It does not come to the feeders with the other birds but is seen foraging on the seeds of a cultivar bush Yolande has in her yard called “Beauty Bush (Kolkwitzia amabilis).”  Yolande suggests that anyone who may have one of these bushes to watch for it being used by seed-eating birds.  Yolande comments that she sees the cardinal at the bush most often in the mornings.

 

** Clarence Cormier seems to have the AMERICAN TREE SPARROW [Bruant hudsonien] capitol.  He was able to count 40 which probably means the real number is actually higher.  That many got the attention of a SHARP-SHINNED HAWK [Épervier brun] that Clarence got a photo of.  He also has a significant presence of many of the expected regulars including 8 RING-NECKED PHEASANTS [Faisan de Colchide].

 

** Yvette Richard prepared her own suet seed bar to have a DOWNY WOODPECKER [Pic mineur] give it an immediate stamp of approval.  Yvette also photographed a male COMMON EIDER [Eider à duvet] with going the other way in mind, and she also got a great photo of a beautiful sunrise taken outside her Cocagne window.  Hard to beat the feeling that image leaves!

 

** Jane LeBlanc reports her YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER [Paruline à croupion jaune] continues to be a regular patron.  Jane’s photo shows the split white eye-ring of this species and a view of the undertail that can sometimes be a very helpful clue in warbler identification.  This scenario also shows how over-wintering warblers stay very faithful to a food source and of course, for good reason.

 

** Lois Budd is one lucky landlady with two PILEATED WOODPECKERS [Grand pic] as patrons coming near-Salisbury yard to partake of her suet blend.  It would be assumed they are indeed a pair and this would be their territory.  Lois’ photo shows one to be a male with the red mustache and the fully red crown, but the photo angle misses the features to confirm female as the second bird.

 

** It is Friday and time to review what we can see in the night sky over the next week, courtesy of sky-guru Curt Nason.

 

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, 2021 January 16 – 2021 January 23
Bright stars and eye-catching asterisms such as Orion’s Belt, the Big Dipper and the Pleaides were obvious targets to immortalize earthly creatures and activities. Rather than Orion being a hunter and the giant son of Poseidon, to the Egyptians he was Osiris, the god of light, riding up the Nile on a boat. In parts of China he was Commander Tsan, protecting farmers from barbarians seeking to steal their winter supplies. Brazilian tribes saw the figure as a turtle, or as the body of a giant caiman with its tail and head extending to constellations above and below Orion. The Inuit saw Orion’s belt and sword as three hunters pulling a sledge and chasing a bear, represented by the red star Betelgeuse, into the sky.  

The Big Dipper forms the back half of the constellation Ursa Major, the Great Bear. In Britain it is The Plough, ancient Germans saw it as seven plowing oxen, and for others it was obviously a cart. Local First Nations people saw the bowl of the Big Dipper as a bear and the handle stars, along with other stars in the constellation Boötes, as hunters. The hunters, who are named for birds, chase the bear from spring to autumn until only the three closest hunters remain above the horizon, at which time the bear is slain by Robin. The bear’s blood stains Robin’s chest and the leaves of the trees.

The Pleiades represent seven daughters of Atlas and Pleione and they mark the shoulder of Taurus the Bull. The Maori of New Zealand imagined them as the prow of their founder’s canoe, with the upper half of Orion forming the stern. Cherokee legend in the southeastern United States tells of seven boys who, in response to being punished for not working, performed a Feather Dance and ascended to the sky. To the Ojibwe, Orion was the Wintermaker and the Pleiades the Hole-in-the-Sky.

This Week in the Solar System    
Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 7:56 am and sunset will occur at 5:01 pm, giving 9 hours, 5 minutes of daylight (7:58 am and 5:09 pm in Saint John).  Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 7:51 am and set at 5:11 pm, giving 9 hours, 20 minutes of daylight (7:53 am and 5:19 pm in Saint John).

The Moon is at first quarter on Wednesday, passing below Uranus and Mars in the early evening. Midweek Uranus will be the brightest “star” half a binocular field below Mars. Jupiter might still be visible in binoculars this weekend, setting 40 minutes after sunset. Mercury should be visible in binoculars and setting at 6:30 pm this weekend, and next weekend it reaches greatest elongation from the Sun. Mars is high in the south in evening twilight, glowing as brightly as Vega. Venus rises an hour before sunrise this weekend and in a few weeks it will be welcoming Saturn and Jupiter to the morning sky.

With astronomy meetings and outreach activities on hold, you can watch the local Sunday Night Astronomy Show at 8 pm, and view archived shows, on YouTube at: 
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAEHfOWyL-kNH7dBVHK8spg

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.

 

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




 

SHORT-EARED OWL HARASSED BY CROWS. JAN 14, 2021.  SUE BERUBE

SHORT-EARED OWL HARASSED BY CROWS. JAN 14, 2021.  SUE BERUBE

SHORT-EARED OWL HARASSED BY CROWS. JAN 14, 2021.  SUE BERUBE

SHORT-EARED OWL HARASSED BY CROWS. JAN 14, 2021.  SUE BERUBE

PILEATED WOODPECKERS. JAN 14, 2021. LOIS BUDD

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK. JAN14, 2021. CLARENCE CORMIER

COMMON EIDER (MALE). JAN 12, 2021. YVETTE RICHARD

DOWNY WOODPECKER. JAN 14, 2021. YVETTE RICHARD

YELLOW RUMPED WARBLER. JAN. 14, 2021. JANE LEBLANC

SUNRISE. JAN 13, 2021. YVETTE RICHARD

Ojibwe Orion









 

Thursday, 14 January 2021

Jan 14 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 14, 2021 (Thursday)  

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 

** It is looking like we may have been mistaking the gender on the EASTERN TOWHEE [Tohi à flancs roux] that Daryl Doucet has been hosting. We have been calling it a male as in earlier photos it seemed much darker, suggesting a male, but recent photos are showing it to be much more brown on top than the darker backed male. Roger Burrows feels it to be a 1st winter female bird which may have contributed to the error. Gilles Belliveau agrees and comments that a first winter male would look more like an adult male and the photos Gilles has compared it to shows the similar darker tertials of a 1st winter bird.

 

**Jim Carroll got a nice photo of a COMMON LOON in non-breeding plumage at Dipper harbour. It is a great photo of the loon but what may be most interesting is what it has as prey. A consultation with Alyre Chaisson gave a definitive answer responding:

 

“This is an easy one, very distinctive. It is an Atlantic
 lumpfish. I have seen the males in breeding coloration,
 a wonderful rosy red. They are a source of less expensive
 caviar;
 you can probably buy it at Superstore. More can be
 found here on
 the species at the link below:
 
https://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/species-especes/
profiles-profils
/lumpfish-lompe-eng.html

 

 

** GREY SQUIRRELS [Ecureuil gris] seem to be becoming more widespread to get some mixed reviews at birdfeeders. The much smaller RED SQUIRREL [Ecureuil roux] is not amused and will sometimes put the run to the much larger Grey Squirrel. Ray Gauvin photographed a Grey Squirrel, but it was what happened after that caught his attention. A Red Squirrel put the run to it across almost 60 feet of lawn, like a bullet, up and down, round and round a yard pine tree. The Grey Squirrel darted across the street while the Red Squirrel stayed in the Pine tree, having completed his mission!

Ray also got another photo of an adult female COMMON EIDER off the Pointe-du-Chene wharf.

 

** Gordon Rattray made a run over Caledonia Mountain a few days ago and got to see all the ice covered trees looking like a fairy land. Gordon stopped by Caledonia Gorge for a winter view that many of us never get to see. Gordon also stopped by John Inman’s Mary’s Point Road feeder yard for a photo of the RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD [Carouge à épaulettes] that is suspected to be a young-of-the year male, and EVENING GROSBEAKS [Gros-bec errant].

 

** As mentioned yesterday, heated water dishes are a magnet to birds in winter. Sterling Marsh sends a photo of one his patrons enjoy. It is actually a heated dog waterer that Princess Auto sells. A lot of folks use them for bird waterers. A stone or brick cap in the center helps to have a second perch area.

 

** The RING-NECKED PHEASANT [Faisan de Colchide] is always a popular visitor to winter feeder yards. Lois Budd was pleased to see her handsome male return for its first visit of the season to sample the menu.

 

** Mac Wilmot also took note of the frost coating of the thick, long needles of an Austrian Pine Tree to make another special effects photo.

 

** Temperatures have been hovering above and below freezing and it has created lots of frost/icicle formations that one may be begrudging to say are rather striking. John Massey shares a photo of his Dieppe home’s roof line with an icicle display.

 

** Brian Stone paid a visit to Bell/Wilson Marsh on Wednesday. Brian, as well as others, took some great photos of the winter ice formations that many are appreciating at the moment. One photo is a duo of BALD EAGLES [Pygargue à tête blanche] showing one that would appear to be a young-of-the-year bird with no tinge of yellow at all on the bill as yet and having very dark plumage, and an adult beside it with the red silt of the Petitcodiac River on its tail. A flock of 100 plus COMMON REDPOLLS [Sizerin flammé] moved about in the snow covered trees.

A loaded HIGHBUSH CRANBERRY shrub was waiting for some wildlife winter fruit connoisseurs to enjoy.

 

** Krista Doyle got a nice flight photo of pair of adult BALD EAGLE [Pygargue à tête blanche] effortlessly floating over her Lewis Mountain home. This species has surely done well since it was almost decimated by the effects of DDT in the 1970’s.  

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton


COMMON LOON WITH ATLANTIC LUMPFISH PREY. JAN.13, 2021. JIM CARROLL

COMMON LOON WITH ATLANTIC LUMPFISH PREY. JAN.13, 2021. JIM CARROLL

COMMON EIDER (ADULT FEMALE). JAN. 13, 2021. RAY GAUVIN

RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD. JAN 10, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

COMMON REDPOLLS. JAN.13, 2021. BRIAN STONE

COMMON REDPOLLS. JAN.13, 2021. BRIAN STONE

BALD EAGLES (ADULT AND IMMATURE). JAN.13, 2021.BRIAN STONE

BALD EAGLE. JAN.13, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

BALD EAGLE. JAN 13, 2021. KRISTA DOYLE

BALD EAGLE. JAN 13, 2021. KRISTA DOYLE

CALEDONIA GORGE. JAN 10, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

CALEDONIA MOUNTAIN RD. JAN 10, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

EVENING GROSBEAKS. JAN 10, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

MOURNING DOVE AND HEATED WATER DISH. MARCH 13, 2021. STERLING MARSH

RING-NECKED PHEASANT. JAN 13, 2021. LOIS BUDD

WILSON MARSH. JAN.13, 2021. BRIAN STONE

WILSON MARSH. JAN.13, 2021. BRIAN STONE

WILSON MARSH. JAN.13, 2021. BRIAN STONE

ICICLES. JAN 12, 2021. JOHN MASSEY

HIGHBUSH CRANBERRY. JAN.13, 2021. BRIAN STONE

 

Wednesday, 13 January 2021

Jan 13 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 13, 2021 (Wednesday)  

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 

** Stella and Jean Paul LeBlanc had a very pleasant day birding in the Bouctouche area on Tuesday. Some new birds for them this winter were 6 AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique], a WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW [Bruant à couronne blanche], and a PILEATED WOODPECKER [Grand pic]. Others that they say are not new to their personal winter list were 2 WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS [Bruant à gorge blanche], 2 AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS [Bruant hudsonien], and a female NORTHERN CARDINAL [Cardinal rouge].

 

**Georges Brun notes a few weeks ago an adult Bald Eagle dove for a lone Canada Geese a hundred feet from Bore Park observation platform.  Luck was on the side of the goose as 5 brave crows who came to the rescue (?) and the bird manage to stave off its demise.  A few days latter a goose was seen to have been injured with no dexterity in its legs.  With the fluctuation of temperatures, the situation for the goose got worse.  Tuesday morning the injured bird was captured by the female Bald Eagle.  When Georges saw the bird, it was down in the Bend area of the river.  It rode a pan of ice eating away with its prey then its partner came by to get his share. 
Later on he noticed a bird on the top of the Chateau Moncton roof observing its surrounding.  It was a MERLIN.  It must have seen and heard about the Common Redpolls and the Snow Buntings in the area!
Two of the SHORT-EARED OWLS were in the marsh area a approximately a hundred feet from the Trans-Aqua compound near the river. One was on the same perch as one photographed Monday on the ground near the tall Phragmites grass.

 

 ** Daryl Doucet’s resident EASTERN TOWHEE [Tohi à flancs roux] continues to be a regular patron at his Moncton feeder yard, as well as his pair of NORTHERN CARDINALS [Cardinal rouge]. The recent addition of a water source for his patrons has been a major hit. It is important to remember that birds need water as well as food in the winter.

 

** The present temperature conditions are producing lots of interesting creations by Jack Frost. Jane Leblanc photographed a nice example on Monday near Hampton.

 

** Pat Gibbs is yet another lucky landlady to have a female NORTHERN CARDINAL [Cardinal rouge] visit her Moncton Yard that came to investigate some of the seed bells that she puts out. Pat also suggests a very interesting write up on where birds go in the winter. Access it from the link below.

 

 

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/news/where-do-migrants-go-in-winter-new-models-provide-exquisite-detail/?utm_source=Cornell%20Lab%20eNews&utm_campaign=619b06f422-Cornell-Lab-eNews-January-2020&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_47588b5758-619b06f422-319046673

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




EASTERN TOWHEE. JAN. 12, 2021. DARYL DOUCET

EASTERN TOWHEE. JAN. 12, 2021. GAIL MILLS

MERLIN. JAN. 12. 2021. GEORGES BRUN

NORTHERN CARDINAL (FEMALE). JAN. 12, 2021. PAT GIBBS

NOTHERN CARDINAL (FEMALE). JAN. 12, 2021.  DARYL DOUCET

NORTHERN CARDINAL (FEMALE). JAN 12, 2021 JP LEBLANC

AMERICAN ROBIN. JAN 12 2021. JP LEBLANC

BALD EAGLE  ON CANADA GOOSE PREY. JAN. 12, 2021.  GEORGES BRUN

BALD EAGLE  ON CANADA GOOSE PREY. JAN. 12, 2021.  GEORGES BRUN

WATER SORUCE WELCOMED. JAN. 12, 2021. DARYL DOUCET

 

Tuesday, 12 January 2021

Jan 12 2021


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, Jan.12, 2021 (Tuesday)

 

  Please advise editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at
www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Susan Richards susan_richards@rogers.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

**Ray Gauvin got a photo of a lone HARP SEAL on an ice floe off Pointe-du-Chene wharf on Monday afternoon.

Dr. Jack Terhune viewed the photo and feels the pelage suggests it to be a young adult animal. He commented there have been several Harp Seal reports recently off the coast.

 

**Lori Joudrey comments she was feeling so badly earlier this week with Covid and the fuss in the United States, then received a photo from her daughter Genevieve that added a bright spot to her day.  Genevieve lives on the 22nd floor of a condo building in central Vancouver.  Two Hummingbirds visit her feeder year -round.  The attached is the photo she got on the evening of January 7th.  Laurie comments it gave her a hopeful warm feeling that she would like to share with others.  British Columbia has several species of resident hummingbirds.

 

**Roger LeBlanc came to his house on Henry Street in Moncton on Monday night to find an AMERICAN CROW [Corneille d'Amérique] roost of approximately 2000 birds right in front of his house.  I got a chance to hear the commotion over the telephone recording message!!

 

**Louise Nichols used the beautiful morning of Monday, for a drive to Route 935 to Slack’s Cove stopping at a few points along the way.  She did not see anything unexpected but there were several SNOW BUNTING [Bruant des neiges] flocks at various coves, a group of approximately 30 RING-BILLED GULL [Goéland à bec cerclé] with some HERRING GULL [Goéland argenté] at Pecks Cove.  She saw a single BLACK SCOTER [Macreuse noire] out in the water along with a small flock of AMERICAN BLACK DUCK [Canard noir] and one ‘almost’ highlight was a single AMERICAN ROBIN [Merle d'Amérique] at Westcock, something that she hasn’t seen much of this Winter.  On Louise’s Ring-Billed Gull observation it strikes me we are seeing more Ring-Billed Gulls remaining in this area over Winter.  It would make one wonder if warmer weather is leading this gull to be less migratory.  

 At one stop, Louise spotted a PORCUPINE [Porc-épic d'Amerique] apparently sleeping in a tree.  She could not get a completely clear photo of it.  It stayed for approximately 10 minutes and didn’t move at all.  Louise comments, it was nice to have some ‘spring’ sunshine.

 

**Brian Stone made a run to enjoy the sunshine as well making stops at Taylor Road on Route 112.  He noted a lot less Snow Buntings than Sunday but a Bald Eagle was monitoring the area from a tree and some very nice winter scenery.  A Crow briefly harassed the BALD EAGLE [Pygargue à tête blanche]  but quickly changed its mind.  A brief stop at the head-of-trail at Bell/Wilson Marsh gave some nice HOUSE FINCH [Roselin familier] portraits.  Note the distant round apex of the tail in the House Finch.  The PURPLE FINCH [Roselin pourpré] tail apex would be forked.  He went out to the Chateau Moncton area to watch the SHORT-EARED OWLS [Hibou des marais] and noted one of the NORTHERN HARRIER [Busard Saint-Martin] reported as still present.  A distant cloud of Snow Buntings was noted as well as the formation of a pleasant Sundog in the sky, as the sun ended its day.

 

**Georges Brun was also monitoring the SHORT-EARED OWL on the Riverview Marsh on Monday. He saw at least 3 individuals.

George also noted a very large flocks of COMMON REDPOLLS working the marsh being the largest he has seen in that area.

 

**Kevin Renton reports their Stilesville feeder yard is very active including 100+ EVENING GROSBEAKS, 20-30 PINE GROSBEAKS (including some reddish adult males), 20-30 COMMON REDPOLLS, and the first flock of SNOW BUNTINGS arrived on Monday.

 

**Suzanne Rousseau from Sussex shares some selfie-photos her Grandson took of a CANADA JAY [Mésangeai du Canada] that perched atop his helmet as he was skiing at Whistler Mountain in B.C.  Suspect a bit of a surprise!  It surely shows the boldness of the Canada Jay.

 

 nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

 


HARP SEAL. JAN. 11, 2021.  RAY GAUVIN

HARP SEAL. JAN. 11, 2021.  RAY GAUVIN

HUMMINGBIRDS (IN VANCOUVER). JAN 7, 2021. GENEVIEVE FLEMING
SNOW BUNTINGS. JAN. 11, 2021. LOUISE NICHOLS


RING-BILLED GULLS. JAN. 11, 2021. LOUISE NICHOLS

AMERICAN ROBIN. JAN. 11, 2021. LOUISE NICHOLS

BLACK SCOTER. JAN. 11, 2021. LOUISE NICHOLS
SHORT-EARED OWL. JAN. 10, 2021. GEORGES BRUN

SHORT-EARED OWL. JAN. 10, 2021. GEORGES BRUN



SHORT-EARED OWL. JAN. 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE

SHORT-EARED OWL. JAN. 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE

SHORT-EARED OWL. JAN. 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE

SNOW BUNTINGS. JAN. 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE

HOUSE FINCH (MALE). JAN. 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE

HOUSE FINCH (FEMALE). JAN. 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN TREE SPARROW AND HOUSE FINCH. JAN. 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE

BALD EAGLE AND CROW. JAN. 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE

CROWS AND BALD EAGLE. JAN. 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE

CANADA JAY. JAN 11, 2021. DANIEL DETURRALDE

CANADA JAY. JAN 11, 2021. DANIEL DETURRALDE

EUROPEAN STARLINGS . JAN. 11, 2021. RAY GAUVIN

PORCUPINE. JAN. 11, 2021. LOUISE NICHOLS

 
SUNDOG. JAN. 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE


NORTHERN HARRIER. JAN. 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE

COMMON REDPOLL FLOCK. JAN. 9, 2021.  GEORGES BRUN

COMMON REDPOLL FLOCK. JAN. 9, 2021.  GEORGES BRUN

COMMON REDPOLL FLOCK. JAN. 9, 2021.  GEORGES BRUN