Monday, 16 July 2018

July 16 2018

 NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, July 16, 2018 (Monday)



To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca   Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt@mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Doreen Rossiter arrived home after the day away on Saturday, to find a WHITE-WINGED DOVE [Tourterelle à ailes blanches] sitting on top of a window feeder, with only the window glass between it and Doreen for a very close up meeting. She has had this species visit before, mostly in the spring or fall, this being the first in July. Anyone is welcome to stop by her 52 Foster Street home in Alma for a potential viewing if it remains, which this species often does for a bit at bird feeders. One would wonder if this may be the individual that visited John Inman’s Mary’s Point Road yard in June.

** Carmella Melanson was lucky to get a photo of a COMMON NIGHTHAWK [Engoulevent d’Amérique] in morning light at Memramcook on Saturday. We seem to be seeing less and less of this species. The long wings and brilliant white spots show nicely on Carmella’s photo. They are early migrants and we often see them in groups during the day in migration, but usually more so in August.

** Judy and Sterling Marsh got a photo of a very white bird in their neighbour’s Shediac Road yard on Sunday. From the shape it does appear to be a EUROPEAN STARLING [Étourneau sansonnet] but differing opinions are welcome. Judy felt the eye was dark, to make it a partial albino, even though it seems to totally lack any melanin otherwise. If the eye were red it would be an unusual complete albino, with iris colour melanin lacking as well. A very interesting specimen, and Judy will be on the watch for a closer photo for more detail. Am adding a photo Judy just got through a basement window that definitely shows the dark eye to make it a partial albino.

** Georges Brun watched an interesting CANADA GOOSE [Bernache du Canada] situation recently. We often see signs along trails that indicate a shared pathway. This was evident Sunday morning when 34+ Canada Geese made the walk along the Petitcodiac Trail, from the lighthouse near Moncton wharf to the Halls Creek walking bridge. They had a challenge determining the safety of using the bridge, and retreated towards the McMonagle Bridge on Main Street and got scared and retreated. A good Samaritan shewed them with hands and hats across, so they turned off towards the Main and Wheeler traffic light. Once there, they were guided by an elder towards the river edge, where the geese slipped and sloshed into the Petitcodiac River. The photo is of the group downriver. Most were in the 3-month of age range now, so they have that Canada Goose look.

** Brian Stone shares some insect photos from around his Moncton yard. The Speckled Alder [] is a plentiful shrub and lots of insects like foraging on it due to its high nitrogen content. The ALDER FLEA BEETLE [Altise de l’aulne] is a very common one that can surely do a number on alder foliage, as Brian’s photos show large numbers of them chowing down on the leaves. A very unwelcome guest to anyone who grows potatos, a COLORADO POTATO BEETLE [Doryphore de la pomme de terre] put in an appearance as well, as did an ALDER BORER (Saperda obliqua), a larger beetle. As usual, Brian could not resist a 22-degree solar halo.

** I was in the Stonehaven wharf area near Grande Anse on Friday. A few visiting ladies were at the other end of the wharf and from their excitement, it was obvious they were seeing something of interest on the water. A fast dash over to see the source of their interest was too late. It was interesting that they had just seen two whales out from the wharf. They only had a small camera with them at the time, but did capture some photos that are documentary. They saw one larger whale and one smaller one. The smaller seemed to almost try a breech at one point. Heather O’Shea’s photos are attached. In consultation with Laurie Murison, she feels the species spotted were MINKE WHALES [Petit Rorqual]. Thank you to Heather O’Shea for sharing her good fortune of being in the right place at the right time, with a camera.

** July is moving along very fast, and it’s time again to remind of Nature Moncton’s Grand Lake Meadows field trip, on July 28. There are still a few spaces open, but are offered on a first-come, first-served basis. The write-up and instructions are attached.

Nature Moncton Field Trip
Date: Saturday, July 28, 2018
Time: 8:30 am start from Moncton, or 10:00 am start at location (for the day)
Location: Grand Lake Meadows
Leader: Gart Bishop
Gart Bishop kept a packed house audience in awe at the photos of unique flora in the Grand Lake Meadows area at a Nature Moncton meeting in April. The opportunity for a hands-on visit is waiting. Explore the flora of Grand Lake Meadows on Saturday, July 28 and get the chance to grab a handful of New Brunswick’s smallest plant. We will see two species of poison ivy, sweet flag, silver maples, many pond weeds, begger ticks, bryozoa, and potentially much more.
Those who are interested in participating in this field trip are asked to register with Louise Nichols at nicholsl@eastlink.ca.  We would like to arrange as much car-pooling as possible which is good for the environment and good for socializing with fellow club members!  When you register, could you also indicate whether you would be willing to drive others OR if you need a drive just so we can ensure we have enough vehicles. 

Those who are joining others for car-pooling and leaving from Moncton will meet in the parking lot of the coliseum on July 28th at 8:30.  Otherwise, we will all meet with Gart at Turner’s One-stop store parking lot at 10:00 at Jemseg, located just south of the TransCanada Highway on Route 339.

Make sure to bring drinking water, lunch, insect repellent, raincoat if indicated, rubber boot footwear, binoculars, and magnifying lens (if you have a pair).

Please note that there will be a maximum of 20 participants for this trip.  All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not.



Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
ALDER BORER BEETLE. JULY 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

ALDER FLEA BEETLES. JULY 14, 2018. BRIAN STONE

ALDER FLEA BEETLES. JULY 14, 2018. BRIAN STONE

CANADA GEESE JULY 15 2018 GEORGES BRUN

COLORADO POTATO BEETLE. JULY 15, 2018._ BRIAN STONE

COMMON NIGHTHAWK July 14th 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

HARVESTMAN. JULY 14, 2018. BRIAN STONE

MINKE WHALE (SUSPECTED). JULY 13, 2018. HEATHER O'SHEA

MINKE WHALE (SUSPECTED). JULY 13, 2018. HEATHER O'SHEA

MINKE WHALE (SUSPECTED). JULY 13, 2018. HEATHER O'SHEA

MINKE WHALE (SUSPECTED). JULY 13, 2018. HEATHER O'SHEA

SOLAR HALO ( 22 DEG. ). JULY 14, 2018. BRIAN STONE

STARLING PARTIAL ALBINO (SUSPECTED) JULY 16, 2018.STERLING MARSH

STARLING PARTIAL ALBINO (SUSPECTED) JULY 15, 2018.STERLING MARSH  

STARLING PARTIAL ALBINO (SUSPECTED) JULY 15, 2018.STERLING MARSH 

STARLING PARTIAL ALBINO (SUSPECTED) JULY 16, 2018.STERLING MARSH 

Saturday, 14 July 2018

July 14 2018




Nature Moncton Information Line – July 14, 2018 (Saturday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

To respond by email, please address your message to the Information Line Editor, nelson@nb.sympatico.ca

Please advise the Editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**Carmella Melanson captured some great photos of an AMERICAN KESTREL [Crécerelle d'Amérique] family at their nest box, viewed directly from the blind at the Reid McManus Nature Park on La Vallée Road (Route 106) in Memramcook. The nest box is on the left side along the fence. It is interesting to note this is a Ducks Unlimited nest box that the Kestrels have used. Note the rodent prey being delivered to a nestling in one photo.

**The RIVER OTTER [Loutre de rivière] is not an uncommon native mammal, but is not often seen. Shaun O’Reilly was in the right place at the right time with a camera, to capture an Otter family enjoying their day at the Miramichi Marsh. When lucky enough to see a group of Otters together, they just seem to be enjoying life, rather like life “otter” be.

**Rhéal Vienneau got a photo of one of the large Fishing Spiders [Araignée pêcheuse] near the Pollett River in Parkindale. These large Spiders of the Dolomedes genus are usually found near water, and frequently on wharves. Rhéal also reports that MONARCH BUTTERFLIES [Monarque] have been around in small numbers for the past week. He has seen lots of eggs on MILKWEED [Herbe à coton], and first instar caterpillars should be in good numbers early starting next week.

**Judy Marsh photographed an unfamiliar grass on a trail at the former Keddy's Motor Inn on the Shediac Road recently. Sean Blaney feels it is SMOOTH BROMEGRASS [Brome  inerme]. Sean comments this was originally introduced for hay. It is now considered quite invasive in the Prairies, but not such an issue here in New Brunswick. Judy’s photo is attached.

**Aldo Dorio spotted more SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS [Bécassin roux] arriving to Hay Island on Friday. The shorebird migration seems to be starting more briskly, with more photos coming in. Aldo also forwards a photo of the plant of the day: SHEEP LAUREL [Crevard de mand boutons]. This attractive plant is toxic to livestock, to get the other common name of “Lambkill”. Aldo also got a photo of the Virginia Ctenucha moth AKA Smokey Moth. It frequently is seen flying during the day and easily confused to be a butterfly. Note the bright blue body and orange-yellow head area.


Nelson Poirier
Nature Moncton
 
AMERICAN KESTREL NEST BOX. July 11th 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

AMERICAN KESTREL NEST BOX. July 11th 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

AMERICAN KESTREL NEST BOX. July 11th 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

FISHING SPIDER. JULY13, 2018.RHEAL VIENNEAU

RIVER OTTERS. JULY 7 2018.SHAUN O'REILLY 

RIVER OTTERS. JULY 7 2018.SHAUN O'REILLY 

RIVER OTTER. JULY 7 2018.SHAUN O'REILLY 

RIVER OTTERS. JULY 7 2018.SHAUN O'REILLY 

RIVER OTTER. JULY 7 2018.SHAUN O'REILLY 

SHEEP LAUREL. JULY 13, 2018. ALDO DORIO

SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. JULY 13, 2018. ALDO DORIO

SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER. JULY 13, 2018. ALDO DORIO

SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHERS. JULY 13, 2018. ALDO DORIO

SMOOTH (AKA HUNGARIAN) BROME GRASS ( Bromus inermis).JULY, 2018. JUDY MARSH

VIRGINIA CTENUCHA MOTH. JULY 13, 2018. ALDO DORIO

Friday, 13 July 2018

July 13 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, July 13, 2018 (Friday)


Please advise editor at nelson@nb.sympatico.ca if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at
www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca.

** There are certain bloodsucking insects that are specific to amphibians and I’m assuming that it is one of these species that Jamie Burris got a striking image of on a GREEN FROG [Grenouille verte].  There is a view at a distance and a close-up to clearly show the blood-engorged insects.  An incredible photo.

** Rheal Vienneau photographed a CRAB SPIDER [Araignées-crabes] lurking on a Common Milkweed plant recently.  We do have several species of Crab Spiders, but the one in Rheal’s photo may be the most common.  Crab spiders are hunters and ambushers, and use their powerful front legs to grab and hold on to their prey while paralyzing it with a venomous bite.

** Carmella Melanson got some striking photos of the day-flying HUMMINGBIRD CLEARWING MOTH [Sphinx colibri] that does such an excellent job of mimicking a hummingbird in its behaviour.  After their egg-laying mission is complete, the eggs will become one of those large green caterpillars we see in late summer.

** Brian Stone got a photo of the plant SPEEDWELL in bloom recently.  We have a few different species of Speedwell native to New Brunswick.

** We don’t see too many photos of the female ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK [Cardinal à poitrine rose].  I’m attaching a photo of the female of the pair patronizing our feeder yard.

** This week’s Sky-at-a-Glance is added to this edition, courtesy of sky guru Curt Nason.

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, July 14 – July 21

Galaxies are favourite targets for amateur astronomers and many are visible with just binoculars. Two are easily seen with the naked eye in the southern hemisphere: the Large and Small Magellanic Clouds. The Andromeda Galaxy is a naked-eye blur for rural New Brunswickers and it looks majestic in binoculars. But there is one galaxy that is spectacular regardless of your location or observing equipment, and that is our home galaxy.

The Milky Way is at least 110,000 light years across, and although it is composed of 200 billion stars we can distinguish only about 4000 as individual stars from a rural area.  The Sun is 27,000 light years from the galactic core, within a spur between the inner Sagittarius and outer Perseus spiral arms. When we look above the spout of the Sagittarius Teapot asterism we are looking toward the galactic core, but vast clouds of dust hide the stars between the spiral arm and the core. South of the head of Cygnus the Swan we see the Milky Way split in two by the Great Rift, one of those dust clouds.

Star formation occurs in clouds of gas and dust within the spiral arms and some can be seen as bright patches with binoculars. Just above the spout of the Teapot is M8, the Lagoon Nebula; and a hint of M20, the Trifid Nebula, can be seen in the same field of view above. Scanning to the upper left up the Milky Way you encounter M17, the Swan (or Omega) Nebula; M16, the Eagle Nebula; and star clusters such as M11, the Wild Duck Cluster in the constellation Scutum the Shield. A tour of the Milky Way under a dark sky can keep a binocular stargazer engaged for an evening.

This Week in the Solar System
Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 5:41 am and sunset will occur at 9:07 pm, giving 15 hours, 26 minutes of daylight (5:49 am and 9:09 pm in Saint John).  Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 5:48 am and set at 9:01 pm, giving 15 hours, 13 minutes of daylight (5:56 am and 9:03 pm in Saint John).

The Moon is at first quarter on Thursday, making a great week for public observing events. It passes just above Mercury this Saturday evening, is near Venus on Monday and Jupiter next Friday. Jupiter’s red spot faces our way at 10 pm on Thursday and, under steady sky conditions, it can be seen with a telescope. Saturn continues to give great views of its rings in a telescope. Mars looks awesome in the late evening; its bright yellow-orange colour really catches the eye.

The annual RASC NB star party at Mount Carleton Provincial Park occurs July 13-14, taking advantage of very dark and moonless skies. Public observing events are also scheduled for Thursday, July 19, at the ball field in St. Martins for Old Home Week, and at the Irving Nature Park in Saint John on Friday, July 20 at 9 pm (cloud date Saturday, July 21).

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
CRAB SPIDER. JULY 12, 2018. RHEAL VIENNEAU

GREEN FROG WITH BLOOD SUCKING INSECTS ATTACHED. JUNE 20. 2018. JAMIE BURRIS 

GREEN FROG WITH BLOOD SUCKING INSECTS ATTACHED. JUNE 20. 2018. JAMIE BURRIS 

HUMMINGBIRD CLEARWING MOTH July 12th 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

HUMMINGBIRD CLEARWING MOTH July 12th 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

Milky Way

ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK (FEMALE) JULY 11, 2018. NELSON POIRIER 

ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK (FEMALE) JULY 11, 2018. NELSON POIRIER 

SPEEDWELL BLOOM. JULY 09, 2018.  BRIAN STONE

SPEEDWELL PLANT. JULY 09, 2018.  BRIAN STONE

Thursday, 12 July 2018

July 12 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, July 12, 2018 (Thursday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, nelson@nb.sympatico.ca . Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Back in May, Louise Nichols came across a WILLOW FLYCATCHER [Moucherolle des saules] in the Tintamarre National Wildlife Area near Sackville. Louise was in the area on Wednesday to discover the Flycatcher in the same spot, vocalizing loudly and was able to get a photo and video of it. It is a great chance to see this uncommon Flycatcher and to hear its song at the same time. Take a look at the video at the attached site and turn up the volume.
 It is hard to describe where exactly it is as it is approximately one kilometer through long grass, brush and thistles on a poorly defined trail. It is where Louise is doing her marsh survey project. Louise also got a photo of a fledgling BOBOLINK [Goglu des prés] and a nice observation of a BRONZE COPPER BUTTERFLY [Bronzé].

** Kim Wilmot had a window strike at her Curryville home that turned out to be a CHUKAR. This is not a native species but is raised for game preserves and for training hunting dogs as well as dog field trials. Unfortunately the hit was fatal.

** Judy Marsh came across a very sizeable hedge of COMMON MILKWEED in full bloom on High Street in Moncton between Mountain Rd. and St. George St. It should be a prime spot for Monarch Butterflies to drop by.

** A few years ago Dale Gaskin found a Woodcock nest on a trail in the woods near his Dawson Settlement home. On Tuesday he was bringing a load of wood along the trail and an AMERICAN WOODCOCK [Bécasse d'Amérique] sauntered across the path. When he got his load of wood home, and split, he went back down the trail to find the Woodcock still in the same area. Dale strongly suspects that they nest in the same area as previous years.

** Aldo Dorio got a photo of a fledgling sparrow at Hay Island on Thursday morning. Note the wide, rubbery edged bill of the fledgling still showing. A male PILEATED WOODPECKER [Grand pic] and a GRAY CATBIRD [Moqueur chat] were also spotted.



Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton


 
BOBOLINK JUVENILE. LOUISE NICHOLS. JULY 11, 2018

BRONZE COPPER BUTTERFLY. LOUISE NICHOLS. JULY 11, 2018

COMMON MILKWEED (BLOOMING PATCH). JULY 11, 2018. JUDY MARSH

GRAY CATBIRD. JULY 12, 2018. ALDO DORIO

PILEATED WOODPECKER (MALE). JULY 12, 2018. ALDO DORIO

SPARROW FLEDGLING. JULY 12, 2018. ALDO DORIO

Wednesday, 11 July 2018

July 11 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, July 11, 2018 ( Wednesday)

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, 
nelson@nb.sympatico.ca . Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier  nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Judy Marsh  marshj@nbnet.nb,ca
Info Line #  506-384-6397" (384-NEWS)

** The AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune] is a late nester, often getting nest construction started as others are fledging. Jack Perry of Saint John has been watching an American Goldfinch at cotton balls from his deck, obviously good material for ling a nest. The bird has been doing this for the past three days.
** Phil Riebel got a great photo of a fresh Rosy Maple Moth, day perched. This is a very colourful  medium sized moth when fresh, as in Phil's photo, but usually fades after a few days into its short mating flight mission.
** Judy and Sterling Marsh photographed a COMFREY plant in bloom on the trail of the former Keddy 's Motor Inn on the Shediac Road on Sunday. This plant is sometimes grown for herbal medicine use, however there are some cautions about its use if taken internally. The plant Judy and Sterling photographed may be a cultivar, or one that has gone to the wild.
** Brian Stone got some photos from a few different angles of a HOBOMOK Butterfly [Hespérie hobomok] a few days ago. This skipper is a fairly common one at this time of year.
** Aldo Dorio took a photo of a male YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER [Paruline à croupion jaune] for a frontal view and a back view, photo positions we don't often see, but the signature split eye ring, white throat, yellow rump, yellow cap and the side patches are clear.
** I was at the Stone Haven wharf near Grand Anse on Tuesday evening. An adult BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON [Bihoreau gris] was fishing at the waters edge near dusk. It was special to watch it stalk its quarry. Some other folk at the wharf said they frequently see this species there. I assume the bird was from the Black-Crowned Night-Heron Rookery at Inkerman, which is not a far distance from the area. A photo was challenging in the on coming darkness.
** I am attaching a few photos of Dragonflies noted on the Point Escuminac Road on July 8th. One is the commonly encountered  Four-Spotted Skimmer Dragonfly. The second is the Incurvate Emerald Dragonfly. Gilles Belliveau points out that this species is classed as S-4 in New Brunswick, which means 'uncommon but not rare'. It may get that classification as it is more restricted to certain habitat like boggy areas and not sufficient records on it as yet. I have photographed the thorax of both of these dragonflies, by holding their tough wings and quickly photographing the side of the thorax which can be very helpful in identification. If you hold them by the wings, it does no harm to the dragonfly. The real challenge is one has to get them in a net first!
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON. JULY 10, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

COMFREY.JULY 8, 2018. STERLING MARSH

FOUR-SPOTTED SKIMMER DRAGONFLY. JULY 8, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

FOUR-SPOTTED SKIMMER DRAGONFLY. JULY 8, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

ROSY MAPLE MOTH. JULY 1, 2018. PHIL RIEBEL

INCURVATE EMERALD DRAGONFLY. JULY 8, 2018. NELSON POIRIER 

INCURVATE EMERALD DRAGONFLY. JULY 8, 2018. NELSON POIRIER 

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER (MALE).JULY 10, 2018. ALDO DORIO

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER (MALE).JULY 10, 2018. ALDO DORIO
HOBOMOK SKIPPER BUTTERFLY. JULY 09, 2018.  BRIAN STONE

HOBOMOK SKIPPER BUTTERFLY. JULY 09, 2018.  BRIAN STONE

HOBOMOK SKIPPER BUTTERFLY. JULY 09, 2018.  BRIAN STONE