Thursday, 29 September 2022

Sept 29 2022

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

Sept 29, 2022 (Thursday)

 

 

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Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

 

**Trail cams have become an interesting part of a naturalist’s tool chest.
Patricia Pelletier captured a clear night photo of a River Otter in the Mud Creek area just outside of Riverview.

 
**Rheal Vienneau found a jerry can of gas aside his Belleisle Creek camp that appeared to be chewed by a Black Bear with evidence of scat nearby to ask the question if bears are attracted to petroleum products.
A Google search reported that bears are attracted to all petroleum products including gas, oil, and grease. These products should be stored securely in an area not accessible to bears. (Editor’s note: I suspect many may not be aware of this, but now we know!­)
 

**Brian Stone was up early on Wednesday morning and took a few photos of the fog effects he saw around his home and area. As the Sun rose and shone through the fog a Fog Bow appeared, fading in and out of visibility as the density of the fog changed minute by minute. He also photographed fog condensed on Spider Web strands among the plants beside his house giving a frost-like effect.

 

 

**The New Brunswick environmental network puts together a list of upcoming events they are aware of for the coming month.

October’s list is attached below. A left click on each event will open it and bring up all details:

Upcoming Events for the Month of October

 

October 1st:

October 2nd:

October 3rd:

October 4th:

October 5th:

October 8th:

October 13th:

October 15th:

October 18th:

October 22nd:

October 31st:

 
 

Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

 

RIVER OTTER. SEPT, 2022. PATRICIA PELLETIER

BEAR CHEWED GAS JERRY CAN. SEPT 27, 2022. RHEAL VIENNEAU

BEAR SCAT. SEPT 27, 2022. RHEAL VIENNEAU

FOG BOW. SEPT. 28, 2022. BRIAN STONE

SPIDER WEB. SEPT. 28, 2022. BRIAN STONE

SPIDER WEB STRANDS. SEPT. 28, 2022. BRIAN STONE

 

Wednesday, 28 September 2022

Sept 28 2022

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

Sept 28, 2022 (Wednesday)

 

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

 

 

**Louise Nichols found a Polyphemus Moth caterpillar crawling on one of the fallen spruce trees taken down by Fiona.  She was also grateful to get an ID from Tuesday's Nature Blog on the Hairy Flower Scarab Beetle which she photographed back in July and didn't know what it was!

 
 

**Aldo Dorio captured a photo of a very fresh appearing Monarch Butterfly in Neguac on Tuesday nectaring on a delicious looking fresh red clover bloom.
Suspect it is fueling up with flight plans to Mexico in place.
 

**Debbie Kierstead photographed a Black and Yellow Argiope spider in her yard on Sunday. Debbie comments “the asters attracting bees and lady bugs are supplying steady business”.
Females of this spider spin orb webs (spiral sticky threads suspended on non-sticky spokes) with a conspicuous white zigzag structure in the middle called the stablementum.
After mating in late summer early fall, females lay several hundred to a thousand or more eggs inside a brown, silk, spherical cocoon about an inch in diameter. The spiderlings hatch but do not emerge from the cocoon until the following spring.
 

**Patricia Peletier was able to capture a photo of a Bobcat on her trail cam this past weekend in the Mud Creek area just outside of Riverview.
Patricia’s photo nicely shows the tail tip with black only on the top versus the Lynx that would have a complete black tail tip. Also note the stripping that goes part way up the bobtail which does not do that in the Lynx.
 

 

 

 

Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

 


BOBCAT. SEPT 22, 2022.  PATRICIA PELLETIER

BOBCAT. SEPT 22, 2022.  PATRICIA PELLETIER

MONARCH BUTTERFLY. SEPT 27, 2022. ALDO DORIO

POLYPHEMUS MOTH CATERPILLAR..SEPT. 27, 2022. LOUISE NICHOLS

POLYPHEMUS MOTH CATERPILLAR..SEPT. 27, 2022. LOUISE NICHOLS

BLACK AND YELLOW ARGIOPE. SEPT 27, 2022. DEBBIE KIERSTEAD

HAIRY FLOWER SCARAB BEETLE. JULY 2022. LOUISE NICHOLS



 

Tuesday, 27 September 2022

Sept 27 2022

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

Sept 27, 2022 (Tuesday)

 

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

 

**Suzanne Rousseau had her last Monarch Butterfly eclose on Sunday, but it needed her help because it had no silk to hang from.
Suzanne has raised 60 Monarch Butterflies in her gazebo this season (Wow!) and lost 2 that she suspected got eaten by probably a mouse. She would leave them there overnight when they weren’t ready to fly. This is the 5th summer that Suzanne has been raising Monarch Butterflies.
 
**Leigh Eaton was a bit surprised to spot a crane fly on their bathroom floor on Sunday morning. The body of the crane fly may not be large, however their impressive leg length from tip to tip can be up to 25 cm.
The adult crane fly would only live several days and does not feed. The mission of the adult is solely to mate and lay eggs.
The cylindrical wormlike larvae grow up to 4 cm in length and are often referred to as leatherjackets due to their tough skin. The larvae are found in the soil feeding on decaying vegetation and plant roots. If the larvae happen to congregate in large numbers, they can cause bare dead patches in a lawn or field.

 

**It’s that time of year when we may see a Western Conifer Seed Bug around our homes or outbuildings as they make overwintering plans.
Donat Robichaud from Russellville shares an excellent photo of one of two that he found around his home.
The Western Conifer Seed Bug is native to North America west of the Rockies on the Pacific Coast. It has in recent years expanded its range to Eastern Canada including the Maritimes. The swelling of the tibia (arrowed) is a great clue to identifying this bug.
It feeds on the sap of developing conifer seeds causing them to wither and misdevelop.
 
**It’s that time of year when duck identification can sometimes be confusing with some duck species still in eclipse plumage and young-of-the-year birds molting into adult plumage.
Aldo Dorio photographed a duck at Hay Island in that category. It would appear to be a Mallard Duck, either a fall edition female or young-of-the-year male.

 

 

**Verica LeBlanc paid a visit to Escuminac and Pointe-Sapin on Sunday as often the waves are higher after a storm. Verica also enjoyed the cloudscape.

As the storm had already passed the surf was reasonably calm and not at all high. However, the angry clouds were very visible. 

They noted a Herring Gull with the surf around it matching its colouring. (Editor’s note: this bird is an adult but is already taking on winter plumage showing the head and neck area streaked with brown).

 A Savannah Sparrow was also cooperative at Escuminac.

On their homebound trip on arriving back at Chatham, the sun lit up the clouds presenting them with a lovely pink hue, giving the impression that the clouds were just hanging cotton balls.

 

**Lisa Morris photographed an interesting beetle back in June that we did not hear back on identification until recently.

It turned out to be a Hairy Flower Scarab which is a bee mimic and quite effective at it.

 

**Brian Stone joined Nelson Poirier and a group of other dedicated birders on an outing to the Cap Pele, Petit Cap, and Cape Jourimain areas on Sunday. Several rare target birds were not found, but many other wonderful regulars were in full view and a number of those made it onto the camera's card to give the photographer a couple evenings worth of editing. 

At Cap Pele (Niles St.) a small group of Bonaparte's Gulls were resting on the beach with Ring-billed Gulls and a few other Gulls. A Great Blue Heron patrolled the rocky breakwater.  At Petit Cap a good selection of Gulls populated the shoreline with White-rumped Sandpipers, Semipalmated Plovers, Black-bellied Plovers (Editor's note: note the black axillary (armpit) of the Black-bellied Plover in one flight photo), and Sanderlings. A Common Tern (Editor's note: note the dark in the upper primaries -- arrowed on the photo -- often present as a wedge particularly evident in fall) flew overhead close by while others flew at a distance and a dozen or so Great Blue Herons waited patiently in the grassy dunes for feeding time to come.

 

At Cape Jourimain, while fruitlessly waiting and hoping for rare species to make an appearance, several other more cooperative species did show up and posed briefly for the binoculars and cameras of the group. Seen were Blackpoll Warblers (fall edition), male and female Black-throated Blue Warblers, Yellow-rumped Warblers, Northern Parula, Black and White Warbler, and Golden-crowned Kinglet. One rarity that did show up, although a bit timidly, was a Clay-coloured Sparrow that foraged on the path at a distance and then perched up in a tree beside the path, both times in the shadows. Autumn Meadowhawk Dragonflies were abundant and a Porcupine came out onto the path well away from the group.

 

 

 

 

 

Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

 

BLACKPOLL WARBLER (FALL EDITION). SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BLACKPOLL WARBLER (FALL EDITION). SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BLACKPOLL WARBLER (FALL EDITION). SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER (MALE). SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER (FEMALE). SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

NORTHERN PARULA WARBLER. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

NORTHERN PARULA WARBLER. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER. SEPT. 25, 2022.. BRIAN STONE

CLAY-COLORED SPARROW. SEPT. 25, 2022..  BRIAN STONE

CLAY-COLORED SPARROW. SEPT. 25, 2022..  BRIAN STONE

CLAY-COLORED SPARROW. SEPT. 25, 2022..  BRIAN STONE

SAVANNAH SPARROW. SEPT 25, 2022. VERICA LeLANC

GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE


BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

SEMIPALMATED PLOVER, WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER, AND SANDERLING. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

SEMIPALMATED PLOVER (JUVENILE). SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

WHIRE-RUMPED SANDPIPER AND SEMIPALMATED PLOVER. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER AND SANDERLING. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER. SEPT. 25, 2022., BRIAN STONE

WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER. SEPT. 25, 2022., BRIAN STONE

SANDERLING. SEPT. 25, 2022., BRIAN STONE


COMMON TERN. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE 

BONAPARTE'S GULLS. (ADULT) SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE 

BONAPARTE'S GULLS. (1ST WINTER AND ADULT) SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE 

BONAPARTE'S GULLS. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE 

HERRING GULL (1ST WINTER). SEPT. 25, 2022., BRIAN STONE

HERRING GULL (WINTER PLUMAGE). SEPT 25, 2022. VERICA LeLANC


GREAT BLUE HERON (JUVENILE). SEPT. 25, 2022.  BRIAN STONE

GREAT BLUE HERON (JUVENILE). SEPT. 25, 2022.  BRIAN STONE

DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT. SEPT 25, 2022.  ALDO DORIO

MALLARD DUCK. SEPT 25, 2022. ALDO DORIO

MONARCH BUTTERFLY CHRYSALIS. SEPT 25, 2022. SUZANNE ROUSSEAU

MONARCH BUTTERFLY ECLOSING FROM CHRYSALIS. SEPT 25, 2022. SUZANNE ROUSSEAU

MONARCH BUTTERFLY ECLOSING FROM CHRYSALIS. SEPT 25, 2022. SUZANNE ROUSSEAU

MONARCH BUTTERFLY ECLOSED FROM CHRYSALIS. SEPT 25, 2022.  SUZANNE ROUSSEAU

MONARCH BUTTERFLY (FEMALE) ECLOSED FROM CHRYSALIS. SEPT 25, 2022.  SUZANNE ROUSSEAU

HAIRY FLOWER SCARAB (Trichiotinus assimilis). JUNE 28, 2022. LISA MORRIS

WESTERN CONIFER SEED BUG. SEPT 21, 2022. DONAT ROBICHAUD 

CRANE FLY. SEPT 25, 2022.  LEIGH EATON

VIREO NEST. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

AUTUMN MEADOWHAWK DRAGONFLIES. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BALD-FACED HORNET NEST. SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE

CLOUDSCAPE. SEPT 25, 2022.  VERICA LeLANC

CLOUDSCAPE. SEPT 25, 2022.  VERICA LeLANC

CONFEDERATION  BRIDGE. SEPT. 25, 2022.. BRIAN STONE

HURRICANE FIONA DAMAGE (RUE NILES). SEPT. 25, 2022. BRIAN STONE