Thursday, 12 December 2019

Dec 12 2019


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 12, 2019 (Thursday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Rhonda and Paul Langelaan were walking on the Buckley Rd. in Second North River to encounter a very lucky audience with a male BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER [Pic à dos noir] in the late afternoon on December 1st. The yellow patch on the crown area indicates it is a male. This yellow patch is lacking in the female. Black-backed Woodpecker sightings are always special as it usually means simply being in the right place at the right time.

** It’s been a slow start to the bird feeding lineup and more folks are starting to get groups of AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune] especially. David Lilly had a group of 6 arrive to his Oromocto feeders on Wednesday to get some very sharp photos of what is possibly a male due to the bright yellow areas.

** It’s great to hear that WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILLS [Bec-croisé bifascié] are moving in to harvest the abundant treetop café of cones that we are experiencing this year. David Christie was talking with some Fundy National Park folk at the Mary's Point beach area when 4 separate flocks of White-winged Crossbills flew over. The first 3 groups that went over were in the 5 to 10 number but the 4th group that went over was approximately 20 in number.

 Dale Gaskin also has found large amounts of scattered cone scales on the ground in woods behind his Dawson Settlement home to suggest high numbers of feeding White-winged Crossbills there. I have heard other second hand reports as well, so the White-winged Crossbills are obviously seriously moving in.

 When David Christie arrived back to his home he saw a flock of approximately 30 plus AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique] harvesting Mountain Ash berries and also a NORTHERN FLICKER [Pic flamboyant] flew over his driveway which he expects was part of the 3 Northern Flickers that he had seen earlier.

** The Moncton Christmas Bird Count happens on Saturday, December 14th, however “count week” runs from 3 days before to 3 days after. That means the count week in Moncton started on Wednesday and runs through till Tuesday. Every bird seen gets counted on Saturday but it is important to report any bird species that may be seen during count week that would be less common that could be easily missed on count day.

** Georges Brun was able to repeat photographing the 2 PEREGRINE FALCONS [Faucon pèlerin] that are still staying around the summit of Assumption Place in Moncton to now be officially included in the count period. He photographed them on Friday, December 6th and again on December 11th. On Wednesday he observed one on the perch of the nest box and a second on the big “A” logo. Chances are getting greater that they will be a part of the important tally on Saturday.

** The INDIGO BUNTING [Passerin indigo] in our Moncton feeder yard was present on Wednesday, so made it into count week. The Nature Moncton black oil sunflower seed order arrived Wednesday afternoon and everyone who came to pick up their order was able to get good observations of it as it happened to be quite cooperative in the later afternoon. It continues its visit today, Thursday.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton





BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER. (MALE). DEC 1, 2019 RHONDA LANGELAAN

BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER. (MALE). DEC 1, 2019 RHONDA LANGELAAN

PEREGRINE FALCONS. DEC 11, 2019. GEORGES BRUN 

PEREGRINE FALCON. DEC 11, 2019. GEORGES BRUN 

PEREGRINE FALCON. DEC 11, 2019. GEORGES BRUN

AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. DEC 11, 2019.  DAVID LILLY

AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. DEC 11, 2019.  DAVID LILLY

Wednesday, 11 December 2019

Dec 11 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 11, 2019 (Wednesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** The black oil sunflower seed delivery from New Brunswick farmer Mike Dickinson will arrive today, Wednesday, at 3:00 pm, at 85 Mount Royal Blvd. in Moncton. Dale Gaskin will be present then, and for the next few hours, to dole it out to folks who ordered it, most of whom hopefully can make a quick visit to pick it up at that time. If you cannot make it, call Dale Gaskin at 734-2197 to make other arrangements. Brian Stone has attached a map to show the site. There is also 2 Ducks Unlimited duck boxes and 1 Nature Moncton Swallow nest box there available free of charge on a first come first served basis. If you would like them, make sure to leave name and email address

** A very big thank you to Alain Clavette for sharing his contagious enthusiasm at Tuesday evening’s Nature Moncton meeting. Alain gave us dozens of certain and possible winter appearing birds to put on our bucket list for the months ahead and lots of interesting tidbits of information on each to give us all the more sense of anticipation.

** Lois Budd shares her birthday present of Tuesday when a female PILEATED WOODPECKER [Grand pic] arrived to her yard to partake of a small suet block. Lois comments that she has been seeing it around all summer and it seemed to be getting closer and closer, but on Tuesday it made an official feeder visit.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton






PILEATED WOODPECKER (FEMALE). DEC 10, 2019.  LOIS BUDD

PILEATED WOODPECKER (FEMALE). DEC 10, 2019.  LOIS BUDD

BLACK-OIL SUNFLOWER DELIVERY-PICKUP SITE AT 3 PM WEDNESDAY

Tuesday, 10 December 2019

Dec 10 2019


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 10, 2019 (Tuesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: david.cannon@rogers.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Tonight, Tuesday December 10th, is Nature Moncton Meeting night, with guest presenter Alain Clavette, on ‘Winter Birds’, beginning at 7:00 p.m.  The write-up for tonight’s meeting is below.
"Flying Beauties of Winter"

Date: December 10, 2019
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Mapleton Rotary Park Lodge (across from where Cabela’s used to be)
Speaker : Alain Clavette



Like it or not, winter is coming. In fact, for the south of the province it seems to have started early. But don’t despair -- spring will be back. And in the meantime Mother Nature will offer some very special treats along with the white stuff, such as winter birds!  What are they, why and when do they come and where can one find them?  To help you answer these questions and many more, Nature Moncton has lined up a great presentation on the subject with one of our top provincial bird experts. Come and meet the naturalist and birder Alain Clavette (of CBC radio fame) for an evening of beautiful photography and info-filled comments on some of the birds that you can observe in New Brunswick only during the long winter months. An added bonus will be that all the photos in the presentation will be originals taken by Alain who doubles as a very talented nature photographer. The presentation could even be a good warm-up for your ID skills which you can use at the Moncton Christmas Bird Count, scheduled for December 14th. Don’t miss this one!

All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not.

Unfortunately, the annual shipment of Black Oil Sunflower seeds will not be arriving in time for the Tuesday meeting. Instead, there will be a delivery later in the week, to a central location in Moncton, and those with orders will be advised as to where and when, they can pick up their order.
**   On Sunday, December 6th, Georges Brun submitted two photos; each of a single PEREGRINE FALCON [Faucon pèlerin] perched on the Logo ‘A’ of the Assumption Place building in downtown Moncton. He forgot to mention that there were actually two Peregrine Falcons, obviously travelling together. Another photo shows the two birds. I cannot tell from the photos whether they were both adults, but it would be interesting to know.
** Krista Doyle photographed a buck WHITE-TAILED DEER [Cerf de Virginie] near her Lewis Mountain home that has managed to get through several hunting seasons unscathed, and is kicking up his heels in delight at getting through this one too.
 Krista also got a photo of a co-operative adult NORTHERN GOSHAWK [Autour des palombes] , a raptor we don’t get to see very often. The sharp white supercilium over the eye shows nicely, and its large size is obvious, compared to the utility pole.

** Christmas Bird Count Co-ordinator, Roger Leblanc, reminds us that the Christmas Bird Count Day is this upcoming Saturday, but that Count Week runs from three days before to three days after, so Count Week begins this Wednesday and concludes next Tuesday. Even though Saturday is the day to count every bird, any other bird species of interest that you observe within the Moncton Count ‘circle’ during the other six days should also be reported. Bird Feeder yards are especially important. If you have a Feeder station, you can print out a list of birds from the Nature Moncton website at www.naturemoncton.com and please record what you see, especially on December 14th, but also for the rest of Count Week.

** Aldo Dorio sends a photograph of a GULL with a feature that can be confusing. Note the black and red smudge on its bill. 3rd winter gulls have a black smudge at that site but would have some grey remnants on the mantle. This may be a HERRING GULL [Goéland argenté] molting into adult plumage but I have seen adult Herring Gulls occasionally in mid-winter with this red and black smudge and I wonder if it is just an adult that has taken on some black on the red smudge as part of its winter plumage change. The head area of the gull has taken on the normal streaked head that all adult Herring Gulls do in the winter. The adult Great Black-backed Gull will continue to sport its white head all winter.  
Aldo also got a photo of a first-winter ICELAND GULL [Goéland arctique]. Note the black bill and the overall light plumage. As well, Aldo photographed a GREAT BLUE HERON [Grand Héron] seemingly wondering if the ice and snow is worth it. The white crown and light upper mandible suggests it is an adult.



Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton





NORTHERN GOSHAWK (ADULT). DEC 9, 2019. KRISTA DOYLE

NORTHERN GOSHAWK (ADULT). DEC 9, 2019. KRISTA DOYLE

PEREGRINE FALCONS. DEC 06, 2019. GEORGES BRUN

ICELAND GULL (1ST WINTER). DEC 9, 2019. ALDO DORIO

HERRING GULL. DEC 9, 2019. ALDO DORIO

WHITE-TAILED DEER. DEC 9, 2019. KRISTA DOYLE

GREAT BLUE HERON (ADULT). DEC 9, 2019. ALDO DORIO

Monday, 9 December 2019

Dec 9 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 9, 2019 (Monday) 


To view the photos mentioned in this edition, go to <http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca>.

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at <http://naturemoncton.com>.

Edited by Nelson Poirier, <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>
Transcript by David Christie, <maryspt@mac.com> 
Info Line #:  506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

                                                      

** As announced in full yesterday, the December Nature Moncton meeting takes place on Tuesday, December 10, at 7 p.m. in the Mapleton Rotary Lodge with presenter Alain Clavette, speaking about “Winter Birds.” The complete write-up is at the website at <http://naturemoncton.com>, under “Upcoming Events,” and will be repeated again in Tuesday’s edition.


** With weather challenges, Dale Gaskin and farmer Mike Dickinson have had difficulties with the delivery of sunflower seeds. The black oil sunflower seed order will not be available at Tuesday night’s meeting, but will be delivered to a central location in Moncton later in the week, and folks who have ordered bags of seed will be advised when and where they will be available for pick-up. For any more information or if more bags are wanted contact Dale Gaskin at 734-2197.


** Georges Brun spotted a PEREGRINE FALCON [Faucon pèlerin] perched on the big ‘A’ logo of Assomption Place on Friday, Dec. 6. A Peregrine Falcon single or pair has stayed in that location for some winters in the past, but not in other winters. With the Christmas Bird Count fast approaching, I hope that it will be observed later this week.


** Gordon Rattray took a run to the Shediac Bridge area on Saturday. He saw a hundred CANADA GEESE [Bernache du Canada] that lifted and flew over, and another 40 Canada Geese in the Grand Barachois area. He also got a nice photo of a RING-BILLED GULL [Goéland à bec cerclé], still with us and going into its adult winter plumage showing a streaked head. Most Ring-billed Gulls will leave us for the cold months.

Gordon has had some interesting patrons arrive in his Weldon feeder yard. Special is the arrival of a PINE WARBLER [Paruline des pins] that enjoyed the suet block, and two BROWN CREEPERS [Grimpereau brun], always special yard visitors. They feed on peanut butter smeared on the bark of a large spruce tree. Also, AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES [Chardonneret jaune] have swollen in number and a few RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES [Sittelle à poitrine rousse] have arrived. Gordon notes that BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES [Mésange à tête noire] are in large numbers this year, as well as woodpeckers. It sure is great to hear that bird feeder activity is getting more active.

Suzanne and Yves Poussart drove along the coast on Sunday from Shediac to Bouctouche. Especially large groups of  COMMON MERGANSERS (Grand harle), COMMON AND BARROW'S GOLDEREYES (Garrot à oeil d'oeil et Garrot d'Islande) were seen on different locations, such near Cormierville, St-Thomas and Bouctouche. A group of 50 CANADA GEESE was observed near Cocagne. A photo of a SONG SPARROW (Bruant chanteur) was taken near the Cormierville wharf. The overall abundance of birds was clearly much higher compared to what it was two or three week ago.
Note the steeply slopped forehead of the Barrow’s Goldeneye that is a very helpful feature to identify 1st year males and females from Common Goldeneye. Some of Yves’ photos nicely show that feature with females of both species in close proximity. Also at this time of year, the adult Barrow’s Goldeneye females are showing the complete orange bill of breeding plumage while the adult Common Goldeneye females have only the bill tip orange in breeding plumage.  



** Jane LeBlanc observed a pair of BALD EAGLES [Pygargue à tête blanche] perched overlooking the St. Martins harbour at low tide on Sunday.


** Doreen Rossiter comments on the INDIGO BUNTING [Passerin indigo] currently present in Moncton. In 1993, while Doreen was assisting with the Christmas Bird Count for Fundy National Park, a small bird arrived in her yard at dusk that day but it was too dark to identify. The next morning it reappeared and turned out to be a male Indigo Bunting. It stayed around until Dec. 27 when there was a major blizzard, and it was not seen after that. Not good news for the present Indigo Bunting landlord!



Nelson Poirier   <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>   
Nature Moncton


PEREGRINE FALCON DEC 06 2019 GEORGES BRUN

PEREGRINE FALCON DEC 06 2019 GEORGES BRUN

PINE WARBLER.DECEMBER 8, 2019.GORDON RATTRAY

PINE WARBLER.DECEMBER 8, 2019.GORDON RATTRAY

BROWN CREEPER.DECEMBER 8, 2019.GORDON RATTRAY

RING-BILLED GULL (ADULT WINTER PLUMAGE).DECEMBER 8, 2019.GORDON RATTRAY

BARROW'S AND COMMON GOLDENEYE. DEC 8, 2019.  YVES POUSSART

BARROW'S AND COMMON GOLDENEYE. DEC 8, 2019.  YVES POUSSART

COMMON MERGANSER. DEC 8, 2019.  YVES POUSSART

COMMON MERGANSER (FEMALE). DEC 8, 2019.  YVES POUSSART

CANADA GEESE. DEC 8, 2019.  YVES POUSSART

GOLDENEYE (MOSTLY). DEC 8, 2019. YVES POUSSART

SONG SPARROW. DEC 8, 2019.  YVES POUSSART

BALD EAGLE. DEC. 8, 2019. JANE LEBLANC

BLUE JAY.DECEMBER 8, 2019.GORDON RATTRAY

Sunday, 8 December 2019

Dec 8 2019


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 8, 2019 (Sunday) 


To view the photos mentioned in this edition, go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca.

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at http://naturemoncton.com.

Edited by Nelson Poirier, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by David Christie, maryspt@mac.com  
Info Line #:  506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

                                                      

** The Nature Moncton December meeting is coming up this Tuesday, December 10, with guest presenter Alain Clavette, on “Winter Birds”.
The Salisbury Naturalists’ Club meets the second Tuesday of the month on a regular basis. Unfortunately, its meeting falls on the same night this month, as Nature Moncton is held a week earlier due to Christmas. They are also hosting an excellent presentation, on shorebirds. Details of both are attached at the end of this edition, coming up front on Tuesday morning.


** Jamie and Karen Burris came to visit the INDIGO BUNTING [Passerin indigo] in our Moncton yard on Saturday and were able to get awesome photos of it in the morning sun, to show much more blue in the plumage than seemed to show in earlier photos. It makes one wonder whether it may be a male. It continues to spend most of its time at a hanging feeder containing white millet, and drops down to the ground to feed on fallen sunflower chips, as one photo shows. It seems to like the chips but does not go to the feeders containing them, and Jamie brought up a good point that it may choose not to go to those feeders, because they are usually crowded with AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES [Chardonneret jaune] and some HOUSE FINCHES Roselin familier]. It has the behaviour of nearly constant tail-flicking, which is now making it easier to spot. It seems to be getting more comfortable in its fourth day now, so I hope it lingers until Christmas Bird Count period and count day, and, probably a pipe-dream, I hope it lingers until the onset of breeding plumage.

Jamie also got an excellent open-wing photo of a NORTHERN FLICKER [Pic flamboyant] in his yard, to see the brilliant yellow undercarriage as it dropped down to feed on his grape vine. 

We just don’t see many insects motoring happily along on the snow surface. Jamie photographed a very small one on Friday, which BugGuide has suggested to be a GALL MIDGE [Mikola fagi]. I assume that it feeds or is connected with plant galls in some way but not able to get more detailed information. It was very small and fragile-looking, but must be very hardy.


** Louise Nichols came across some mammal tracks in shallow snow in the Aulac area on Thursday. The tracks were making a trail 11 inches apart and were equidistant from one another. This pattern is typical of the Mustelidae group. Weasel [mustela] would be one of the first rule-outs, but without more sleuthing a definite call can’t be made.


** Jane LeBlanc captured her St. Martins yard RUFFED GROUSE [Gélinotte huppée] taking advantage of some MOUNTAIN-ASH [sorbier] berries to flavour its normal winter bud diet.


** Aldo Dorio got a photo of a female COMMON MERGANSER [Grand Harle] and a female COMMON GOLDENEYE [Garrot à oeil d’or] in the water off Hay Island on Saturday.


** Pat and I visited the Tantramar Marsh area on Saturday and were able to spot only one ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK [Buse pattue], whereas Les Amis de Nature spotted two on Thursday and one SHORT-EARED OWL [Hibou des marais] at dusk. It really hit home, how very important the MEADOW VOLE [Campagnol des champs] really is to Rough-legged Hawks,Red-tailed Hawks, Short-eared Owls, Northern Harrier [Busard Saint-Martin], Foxes [Renard roux] and Coyotes. It was only three years ago these predators were in amazing abundance, but only because the Meadow Vole was abundant.


Tuesday night’s presentations are attached below

"Flying Beauties of Winter"

Date: December 10, 2019
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Mapleton Rotary Park Lodge (across from where Cabela’s used to be)
Speaker : Alain Clavette

 

Like it or not, winter is coming. In fact, for the south of the province it seems to have started early. But don’t despair -- spring will be back. And in the meantime Mother Nature will offer some very special treats along with the white stuff, such as winter birds!  What are they, why and when do they come and where can one find them?  To help you answer these questions and many more, Nature Moncton has lined up a great presentation on the subject with one of our top provincial bird experts. Come and meet the naturalist and birder Alain Clavette (of CBC radio fame) for an evening of beautiful photography and info-filled comments on some of the birds that you can observe in New Brunswick only during the long winter months. An added bonus will be that all the photos in the presentation will be originals taken by Alain who doubles as a very talented nature photographer. The presentation could even be a good warm-up for your ID skills which you can use at the Moncton Christmas Bird Count, scheduled for December 14th. Don’t miss this one! 

All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not.



 Salisbury Naturalist Club Meeting- Tuesday Dec.10th @ 7PM
Parks and Leisure meeting room at 62 Douglas Street, Salisbury.
 (across from JMA Armstrong School)

Our guest presenter this month will be Rebecca Linhart. She is a Masters student at Mount Allison University. She works under the supervision of her professor, Diana Hamilton and closely with the Canadian Wildlife Services. They are investigating the movement, behavior, diet and habitat use of Semipalmated Sandpipers here in Atlantic Canada and Ceara state Brazil.

Semipalmated Sandpipers make their annual Fall migration through this area and they arrive in the tens of thousands. I am sure you have seen them either at Mary's Point or Johnsons Mills.

Rebecca will have to present her thesis to a panel of jurors eventually and we will be getting a preview of her work. It should be very interesting and she is very keen to do this.

 



Nelson Poirier   nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com   
Nature Moncton






INDIGO BUNTING. DEC 7, 2019. JAMIE BURRIS

INDIGO BUNTING. DEC 7, 2019. JAMIE BURRIS

INDIGO BUNTING. DEC 7, 2019. JAMIE BURRIS

INDIGO BUNTING. DEC 7, 2019. JAMIE BURRIS

WEASEL TRACKS (SUSPECTED). DEC. 6, 2019. LOUISE NICHOLS

WEASEL TRACKS-TRAIL (SUSPECTED). DEC. 6, 2019. LOUISE NICHOLS

RUFFED GROUSE. DEC. 7, 2019. JANE LEBLANC

NORTHERN FLICKER (MALE) DEC 7 2019 JAMIE BURRIS

NORTHERN FLICKER (MALE) DEC 7 2019 JAMIE BURRIS

COMMON MERGANSER (FEMALE). DEC 7, 2019. ALDO DORIO

COMMON GOLDENEYE (FEMALE). DEC 7, 2019. ALDO DORIO

GALL MIDGE (Cecidomyiidae). DEC 6 2019 JAMIE BURRIS

GALL MIDGE (Cecidomyiidae). DEC 6 2019 JAMIE BURRIS