Friday, 24 January 2020

Jan 24 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 24, 2019 (Friday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

One click on the photos opens them full screen

Please advise editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at
www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com.

** The CAROLINA WREN [Troglodyte de Caroline] pair are still making the rounds of the Court St. area of Riverview, and seem to swelling their feeder yard site visits.  Jim Carroll made a pilgrimage to the area on Thursday and was able to locate one to get a nice photo and an audio recording of its sound.  That wren cocked tail and huge bill (for the size of the bird) show nicely in Jim’s photos.  It may be the female as the vocalization is not boisterous.  Jim adds a comment too good not to share:  “It was a great day adventure and who needs a tropical vacation when you can have this much fun in New Brunswick.”  Check out Jim’s recording at the attached site.


** Again to announce an impromptu field trip that is not on the website and it’s looking like a great winter day to be out.  An impromptu birding field trip is coming up tomorrow, Saturday, January 25th.  As a follow-up to the Nature Moncton workshop two Saturdays ago when the weather did not permit the outing that was planned that afternoon, Roger Leblanc said he would offer an outing when Mother Nature would cooperate better.  That surely was not last weekend, but tomorrow, January 25th, is looking good, so he will follow up by offering a morning outing from 9:00 to 12:00 in the Moncton region.  We can meet at the parking lot behind Chateau Moncton at the walking bridge, and from there we’ll explore a couple of spots in the city concentrating on bird identification.  In the afternoon, Roger has to do a BARROW'S GOLDENEYE [Garrot d'Islande] (sea duck) survey in the context of a Nature NB project, so we’ll head off to Cocagne and Caissie Cape area to do that.  If you are interested, you’re more than welcome to join for that also.  Just come if you’d like and, as always, all are welcome, Nature Moncton members or not.

Roger billed this as a learning-to-bird event.  However, several of us supposedly experienced birders attended the workshop and found lots of new tidbits to use.  Although Roger stressed the Barrow’s Goldeneye in the afternoon, there’s a big variety of sea ducks that travel with them to peruse.  A pleasant day with sun and moderate temperatures predicted are ideal winter conditions.  The whole day is going to be worthwhile, but if one is unable to attend both, join the group for one or the other.  The meeting place for the Moncton start is at the Chateau Moncton.  If anyone wishes to go for the afternoon, meet also at the Chateau Moncton at 12:30 PM to head up the coast.  Carpooling for either trip is indicated.  A contact number for the day will be 852-0863. 

** It’s Friday, and this week’s Sky-at-a-Glance is included in this edition courtesy of sky guru Curt Nason.   Predictions are looking like we may have some clear night skies ahead.

This Week’s Sky at a Glance.  January 25 – January 31, 2020

Monoceros is a constellation that is easy to locate, sandwiched between Orion’s dogs Canis Major and Canis Minor, but it is not easy to see. From urban areas its dim stars are as elusive as the unicorn they depict. It was one of eight new constellations created on a globe by the Dutch cartographer Petrus Plancius around 1612. Of those eight, only Monoceros and Camelopardalis are recognized as official constellations today. Monoceros is situated within the winter Milky Way, which is apparent in rural skies.

Despite being a dim constellation, Monoceros is home to some favourite targets of astrophotographers, in particular the beautiful Rosette Nebula. Another is the combination of the Cone Nebula, Christmas Tree Cluster and the Fox Fur Nebula. Check the Internet for their stunning images. Monoceros has one Messier object within its boundary, the large open cluster M50, otherwise known as the Heart-Shaped Cluster. It can be seen in binoculars about 40% of the distance from Sirius to Procyon. Three other open clusters on the Messier list are found near Monoceros but they lie officially within other constellations. They are the close pair of M46 and M47 in Puppis, and M48 in Hydra.

This Week in the Solar System  
Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 7:49 am and sunset will occur at 5:13 pm, giving 9 hours, 24 minutes of daylight (7:52 am and 5:20 pm in Saint John).  Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 7:42 am and set at 5:23 pm, giving 9 hours, 41 minutes of daylight (7:45 am and 5:30 pm in Saint John).

The Moon is new on Friday, January 24, and it is at first quarter on February 1. On Monday and Tuesday it makes an eye-catching pairing below and then to the left of Venus. Also on Monday, just after twilight, a telescope or steadily-held binoculars might reveal Neptune very close to the lower right of Venus. Mercury sets around 6:30 pm midweek, an hour and a half before Venus. In the morning sky, Mars hangs out to the left of Antares in the southeast, while Jupiter makes its presence known a hand span to the lower left of Mars. Saturn rises in twilight about 40 minutes before sunrise.

RASC NB members are offering public observing at the Moncton High School observatory on January 24 from 6:30 to 8 pm; and at the Mactaquac Park office, across the road from the park entrance, from 7 to 9 pm on Saturday, January 25. The Saint John Astronomy Club meets in the Rockwood Park Interpretation Centre on February 1 at 7 pm. All are welcome.

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.


nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton

CAROLINA WREN. JANUARY 23, 2020. JIM CARROLL

CAROLINA WREN. JANUARY 23, 2020. JIM CARROLL

Monoceros 2020

Thursday, 23 January 2020

Jan 23 2020

 NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 23, 2020 (Thursday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Gordon Rattray woke up to an early morning fog on the Petitcodiac River in the cold of Wednesday morning that created some striking frost creations that Gordon photographed. It seemed to be all in a small section of the Weldon-Hillsborough area.

Yvette Richard was in the Cocagne area on Wednesday and took a few photographs of some of the waterfowl that can be expected on the impromptu field trip there this Saturday afternoon. Yvette sends photos of COMMON MERGANSER and COMMON GOLDENEYE. Other species will be expected along with Gulls in adult and 1st, 2nd, and 3rd winter plumages. Iceland Gulls and Glaucous Gulls that only visit us in winter are often in that area interested in remnants of the smelt fishery in progress at the moment.

** That impromptu birding field trip is coming up this Saturday as a follow up to the Nature Moncton workshop a few Saturdays ago. Since the weather did not permit the outing that was planned for that afternoon Roger Leblanc said he would offer an outing when Mother Nature would cooperate. That certainly was not last weekend but this Saturday, January 25th, is looking good so he will follow up on that by offering a morning outing from 9:00 am to 12:00 pm in the Moncton region. Meeting place will be the parking lot behind Chateau Moncton next to the walking bridge. From there the group will explore a couple of spots in the City area concentrating on bird identification.

In the afternoon Roger has to do a Barrow’s Goldeneye (sea duck) survey in the context of a Nature New Brunswick project so he will head off to the Cassie Cape area to do that. If you are interested you are more than welcome to join him for that also. No registration is necessary … just come along if you like. As always all are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not. Roger had billed this as a “learn to bird” event, however several of us supposedly experienced birders attended and found lots of new tidbits to use. Although Roger stressed the Barrow’s Goldeneye survey in the afternoon on Saturday there is a large variety of sea ducks that travel with them to peruse. A pleasant day with sun and moderate temperatures predicted is ideal winter conditions.

The whole day is going to be worthwhile but if one is unable to attend both parts and prefers one or the other you can join the group for either part. The starting point for both parts is the Chateau Moncton parking lot at the walking bridge … 9:00 am for the morning section and 12:30 pm for the afternoon section. Carpooling can be decided at the time if wished. A contact number for the day is 858-0863 or 866-2752.

** A thank you to the participants of Nature Moncton’s “Member’s Night” meeting Tuesday night. Adam Cheeseman from Nature New Brunswick gave a presentation on the nearby Caledonia Gorge Protected Natural Area that generated nice discussion. Some great wildlife and scenery photos were shared with Brian Stone’s artistic photo show and Gordon Rattray’s excellent diversity of birds and animals.

The lineup for the Petitcodiac River Appreciation Day event on April 04th was reviewed. This is the largest project that Nature Moncton has ever taken on and so far it appears to be going well. Several appropriate speakers are lined up with writeups on their presentations done. It will hopefully be placed completed on the website very soon for public viewing and it will be announced when it is posted. 

** A heads up for potential photographers or those who might want to get more out of their cameras that they already own … The Nature Moncton activities committee has arranged for a “Getting the Most out of Your Camera” workshop on Saturday, February 1st. Many of you have experienced the photography of the presenters on the blogspot so it is a great chance to tap them for ideas and suggestions. The writeup as it appears at the www.naturemoncton.com website under “Upcoming Events” is attached below.

Nature Moncton Workshop
“Getting the Most out of your Camera”
Date: February 1, 2020
Time: 9:30 AM to 12:00 noon (with the option of some outside practice time after lunch)
Location:  Tankville School, 1665 Elmwood Drive, Moncton
Leaders: Gordon Rattray, Fred Richards and Brian Stone
Cost:  $8.00
Participants in this workshop will have the opportunity to learn how their cameras function when taking a picture.  Our three presenters will talk about the components of a photograph and will show how a camera can be used to get a certain look, with some discussion on how best to compose a photo.  Later in the session, we will focus on how to find a good picture opportunity and the setup that will work best to obtain the most satisfying results.

Participants are encouraged to bring their cameras (either DSLRs or Point-and-shoot) and practice what they learn on their own equipment.  The presenters will be more than happy to answer questions.
This is not a photography class as such, but an overview of cameras and photography.
Bring a lunch, especially if you plan to stay and practice.
All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not.



Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton




COMMON GOLDENEYE (MALE), JAN 22, 2020 YVETTE RICHARD

COMMON MERGANSER (FEMALE) JAN 22, 2020 YVETTE RICHARD

RIVER FOG. JAN 22, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

FROST. JAN 22, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

MORNING FROST. JAN 22, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

WHITE BIRCH. JAN 22, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

GRAY'S ISLAND ROAD. JAN 22, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

Wednesday, 22 January 2020

Jan 22 2020

 NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 22, 2020 (Wednesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Pat McLaughlin came across an interesting scenario this Sunday. She was on a groomed four-wheeler trail near Curry Corner in Bathurst. Sitting in the middle of the trail was a SURF SCOTER [Macreuse à front blanc] which was several miles from water. They thought it couldn’t fly from the ground as when they approached it, it just flopped into the deep snow on the side of the trail. A few minutes later it came back on to the trail and when they started the bike it started to run and managed to get itself airborne. They hoped that it flew far enough to make it to open water. The Scoters, like many pelagic waterfowl, have great difficulty taking flight from land if they accidentally end up there. They are designed for life on the water and they run on the water surface to take flight as their center of gravity is farther back on their bodies to enable diving deeper for food.

** Peter and Deanna Gadd checked a few spots along the coast en route to Miramichi on Tuesday and came across hundreds of MALLARD DUCKS, a handful of Black Ducks, and 2 Northern Pintail in a freshwater pond adjacent the Bouctouche water treatment lagoons. Among them was a mystery entry. Peter got an excellent photo to suggest it is very possibly a leucistic Mallard Duck among the throng of ducks. It surely does stand out and one suspect more of us may get to see at this popular duck overwintering site


** Doreen Rossiter had a visit from a male RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER [Pic à ventre roux] to her Alma yard on Tuesday morning. Doreen had a male Red-bellied Woodpecker visit her yard on December 19th so I am not sure if this may be the same one or another in the area.

** Daryl Doucet got some nice photos of HOUSE FINCHES [Roselin familier] visiting his Moncton feeder yard showing the variability among the males and the relatively conservatively dressed females. Daryl also photographed several AMERICAN BLACK DUCKS [Canard noir] in the open water around the newly opened Cocagne bridge.

** A lot of us have been wondering where the Red-breasted Nuthatches are this year, with so many cones available for them. Jane Leblanc did have 2 RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES [Sittelle à poitrine rousse] show up at her St. Martins feeder yard on Tuesday for the first time this season.

** AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique] seem to be showing up more. Clarence Cormier had 1 arrive on Tuesday afternoon to his Grande Digue site. This is his first sighting of a Robin since October 13th 2019. The Mountain Ash trees are still full of berries in his area. On Monday a large NORTHERN GOSHAWK [Autour des palombes] dropped by his feeder area in hot pursuit of a male RING-NECKED PHEASANT [Faisan de Colchide]. They fought for a few seconds then the pheasant escaped and flew off with the goshawk in hot pursuit. Clarence comments that his daily feeder activity has increased, but only slightly. Notable are 8 to 13 AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS [Bruant hudsonien] present and 7 RING-NECKED PHEASANTS [Faisan de Colchide].

** A feature that helps to separate the similar Clay-colored Sparrow and the Chipping Sparrow is the grey back area of the Chipping Sparrow which is more brown in the Clay-colored Sparrow. There are other clues as well but this one is helpful. My now seemingly resident, winter plumaged CHIPPING SPARROW [Bruant familier] gave an opportunity to get a photo to show that feature. It seemed to take the recent cold snap fine, and I hope it stays until spring to watch the change to breeding plumage.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton




DUCK (LEUCISTIC MALLARD DUCK SUSPECTED) JAN 21, 2020. PETER GADD

HOUSE FINCH (FEMALES). JAN 21, 2020. DARYL DOUCET

HOUSE FINCH (MALE). JAN 21, 2020. DARYL DOUCET

HOUSE FINCH (MALE). JAN 21, 2020. DARYL DOUCET

HOUSE FINCH (FEMALE). JAN 21, 2020. DARYL DOUCET

CHIPPING SPARROW. JAN 21, 2020. NELSON POIRIER

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH. JAN. 21, 2020. JANE LEBLANC

BLACK DUCKS. JAN 21, 2020. DARYL DOUCET

Tuesday, 21 January 2020

Jan 21 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 21, 2020 (Tuesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .
One click on the photos brings them full screen

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: david.cannon@rogers.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** The January meeting of Nature Moncton will take place tonight, Tuesday, January 21st, at the Mapleton Rotary Lodge, with the annual Members’ Night. Members are asked to share nature events they have experienced, in short vignette style. If you have an item to present, please advise President Gordon Rattray, at gordonr@nbnet.nb.ca , so that he can schedule the evening.
At the moment, Adam Cheeseman from Nature New Brunswick will update on the nearby Protected Natural Area, Caledonia Gorge. 

Nelson Poirier will outline the planned itinerary for the Nature Moncton project “Petitcodiac River Appreciation Day,” coming up on April 4th.

Brian Stone will give a nature photo show from the past year, and Gordon Rattray will do the same.

In the second half, President Gordon plans to work the group for comments on things that caught their attention over the year.
It should be a very interesting evening, with a variety of topics.

** It is nice to hear that PURPLE FINCH [Roselin pourpré] are starting to show up in numbers, as they often do at feeder yards as the days lengthen in late January and February. Doreen Rossiter had 15 Purple Finch arrive in her Alma feeder yard on Monday, of mixed gender - bearing in mind that the males don’t take on their adult plumage colours until their second Fall of life. Also her WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS [Bruant à gorge blanche] jumped to 7 whereas a few days ago there were only 2 in Doreen’s yard.
**  Gordon Rattray comments on bird activity at his Weldon feeder yard; the PINE WARBLER [Paruline des pins] continues to be a regular - it is going to white millet and a suet blend. He also has a high number of AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune], with 40-60 at a time. However one AMERICAN TREE SPARROW [Bruant hudsonien] arrived for the first time this season on Monday, with a lone DARK-EYED JUNKO [Junco ardoisé] dropping by on Sunday. Gordon has several woodpeckers, but no sign of the RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER [Pic à ventre roux] he had as a regular last winter.
** Brian Stone took a long walk through Mapleton Park in the beautiful sunshine on Monday. The fresh snow made for beautiful scenery but other activity was quiet except for small rodent trails in the fresh snow, and all the ducks still there - only more of them now.

** So far we are having an easy winter in the Moncton area, but that sure could change fast, although the forecast for the next several days is all good. It is all a bit unusual for Moncton with one-third of Winter officially over as of January the 20th. The Spring Equinox this year will be on March 20th and there are many examples of wildlife having Spring thoughts on their minds as the days are beginning to noticeably lengthen. Let’s not say that too loudly, but things are looking good!


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton




PINE WARBLER. JAN 19, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

MAPLETON PARK. JAN. 20, 2019.. BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN TREE SPARROW. JAN 20, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. JAN 20, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. JAN 20, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

DARK-EYED JUNCO (MALE).  JAN 20, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

DUCKS AT MAPLETON PARK. JAN. 20, 2020. BRIAN STONE

Monday, 20 January 2020

Jan 20 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 20, 2020 (Monday) 


To view the photos mentioned in this edition, go to <http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca>.
One click brings photos full screen

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>. 

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at <http://naturemoncton.com>.

Edited by Nelson Poirier, <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>
Transcript by David Christie, <maryspt@gmail.com>
Info Line #:  506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


                                                      
** It is always nice to have a report from Doreen Rossiter’s Alma yard. The storm brought on action with DARK-EYED JUNCO [Junco ardoisé] numbers swelling to 50 from 20-25 and WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS [Bruant à gorge blanche] going to 5 from 2. Obviously, these birds were in the area, feeding on wild food before the storm came on.

Doreen comments that she has not seen an AM. ROBIN [Merle d’Amérique] in a few months, but 8 to 10 showed up on Sunday to the mountain-ash berries on a yard tree, as well as a flock of EUROPEAN STARLINGS [Étourneau sansonnet], which is the first time she has seen them at the berries.

AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune] were very busy eating the heads of sunflower plants that Doreen had left in her garden.

Doreen also comments that she is a bit surprised to have seen no raptors so far this year, even though songbird numbers are abundant.


** Sunday’s storm surely brought birds to feeder yards. Jane LeBlanc noted the DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoisé] and sparrows [espèces des bruants] were not hesitant to check out suet feeders. I noted the same in my own yard and put a second hanging white millet feeder into service, as ground-spread millet was covered so quickly.

A RUFFED GROUSE dropped by a yard birch tree in late Thursday with highlight in its plumage from the brilliant setting sun,
.
Dave Christie comments he did not notice an increased number of patrons at his bird feeders during the storm however they stayed put at the feeders instead of coming and going.

Jane’s yard’s Witch-Hazel [Hamamélis de Virginie] bush, where birds like to perch is still showing the yellow remnants of its very late flowers and some of last year’s seeds have popped. The witch-hazel is a shrub with unique behaviour.


** Again, a reminder of the Nature Moncton January meeting tomorrow night, Tuesday night, at 7 o’clock at Mapleton Lodge, with members’ night that was on yesterday’s edition and will be up-front tomorrow again.



Nelson Poirier   <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>   
Nature Moncton



DARK-EYED JUNCO AND WHITE-THROATED SPARROW. JAN. 19, 2020.JANE LEBLANC

DARK-EYED JUNCO. JAN. 19, 2020.JANE LEBLANC

RUFFED GROUSE. JAN. 18, 2020.JANE  LeBLANC

Sunday, 19 January 2020

Jan 19 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 19, 2020 (Sunday) 


To view the photos mentioned in this edition, go to <http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca>.

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>. 

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at <http://naturemoncton.com>.

Edited by Nelson Poirier, <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>
Transcript by David Christie, <maryspt@gmail.com>
Info Line #:  506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


                                                      
** The January meeting of Nature Moncton will take place Tuesday evening, January 21, at the Mapleton Rotary Lodge, with the annual members’ night. Members are asked to share nature events they have experienced, in short vignette style. Each one who has an item to present, please advise President Gordon Rattray at <gordonr@nbnet.nb.ca> so he can schedule the evening.

At the moment, Adam Cheeseman from Nature New Brunswick will update on the nearby Protected Natural Area, Caledonia Gorge. 

Nelson Poirier will outline the planned itinerary for the Nature Moncton project “Petitcodiac River Appreciation Day,” coming up on April 4.

Brian Stone will give a nature photo show from the year and Gordon Rattray will do the same.

In the second half, President Gordon plans to work the group for comments on things that caught their attention over the year. It should be a very interesting evening, with a variety of topics.

** We don’t see HOUSE SPARROWS [Moineau domestique] very frequently any more in New Brunswick. They were once very common. Elaine Gallant reports that she saw a flock of approximately 20, just off Collishaw Street, across from the Tim Horton location there. They frequent the feeder yard of Bob Henry and a few neighbours in that area, and come from the Co-op feed mill across the street. It is not known for certain why their numbers have dropped so much, but the same has happened in the U.K., where they were common.

They are very aggressive with TREE SWALLOWS [Hirondelle bicolore] and EASTERN BLUEBIRDS [Merlebleu de l’Est], so their demise is very likely a reason for the increasingly abundant Eastern Bluebird in New Brunswick.

The FOX SPARROW that visited Suzanne Rousseau’s yard in Sussex a few days ago survived the cold night fine and was today joined by another Fox sparrow…a twin surprise.

** Brian Stone’s yard DEER MOUSE [Souris sylvestre] made a visit to a yard tree base again on Saturday, leaving nicer trails in the firmer snow. Maybe it knew it would be its last chance to leave such nice tracks for a while! Take note of the prints it left, that the arrow is pointing to. If they were not so small they would be similar to the tracks/trail of a RED SQUIRREL [Écureuil roux] or a SNOWSHOE HARE [Lièvre d’Amérique], which gallop across the snow surface in a very similar fashion.

** My own yard erupted on Saturday afternoon, when what seemed to be a large raptor descended and very promptly took done a ROCK PIGEON [Pigeon biset]. By the size of the bird of prey I immediately assumed it was a COOPER’s HAWK [Épervier de Cooper].

However, a few photos got me wondering if it might not be a large female SHARP-SHINNED HAWK [Épervier brun]. A consultation with Gilles Belliveau pointed out that it was indeed a Cooper’s Hawk.In his opinion, noting the dark crown of the head and gray nape giving it that capped look. the general robust look, the large bill, the legs appearing thick and rounded instead of laterally compressed as in a Sharp-shinned Hawk, a relatively small eye in comparison to the Sharp-shinned Hawk, and some literature suggests that the eye of an adult Cooper’s does have an orange cast. I would also feel it is safe to assume any hawk looking like a large Sharp-shined Hawk and able to quickly dispatch a pigeon and carry it away like a sparrow is probably a Cooper’s Hawk.



Nelson Poirier   <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>   
Nature Moncton



COOPER'S HAWK. JAN 18, 2020. NELSON POIRIER

COOPER'S HAWK. JAN 18, 2020. NELSON POIRIER

COOPER'S HAWK. JAN 18, 2020. NELSON POIRIER

COOPER'S HAWK. JAN 18, 2020. NELSON POIRIER

DEER MOUSE TRACKS. JAN. 18, 2020