Sunday, 17 June 2018

June 17 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, June 17, 2018 (Sunday)
  
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca   Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt@mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Many of us have COMMON MILKWEED [Herbe à coton] and SWAMP MILKWEED [Asclépiade incarnata] in our yards now to give the MONARCH [Monarque] butterfly a helping hand. These plants have many other insects that use them as well. One is the colourful MILKWEED LEAF BEETLE [Chrysomèle de l'asclépiade]. Ron and Linda Steeves noted several on their milkweed patch on Saturday. I have not personally seen them do a lot of damage like the Milkweed Tussock Moth [Arctiide de l'asclépiade] caterpillar does, but apparently, they can sometimes be problematic. Their orange egg masses are easily spotted and removed, if a problem. A photo is attached.

** Peter and Deana Gadd came across an interesting mass of small bugs recently in scrubland. They seemed to emerge from a dry, rotten piece of wood in the ground. They were small bugs but very brightly marked, resembling lady beetles. Bug Guide https://bugguide.net/node/view.6982 has identified them as WHITE-MARGINED BURROWER (Sehirus cinctus) bug nymphs. The adults are dark in colour with a white margin. The adult female deposits eggs in shallow burrows and, when hatched, will actually tend them for one to three days. The adults prefer to forage on nettle and mint. I’ve never seen these, as I suspect many others may not have, but Peter’s photo will flash up when we see them.

** Brian Stone got a nice photo of the crescent MOON [Lune] and how it appeared as it passed planet VENUS [Vénus] in the night sky on Friday evening. Brian also got an excellent photo of a MAYFLY [éphémère], an insect we will see several species of this summer, sometimes in hatches of huge numbers. Their “sailboat” silhouette and two long tails are characteristic. They spend most of their lifetime under water and emerge for a few short weeks, lay eggs and pass on. Their presence around streams and lakes is an excellent indicator of good water quality.

** Nature Moncton’s “What’s that Bird?” event was held on Saturday. Roger LeBlanc gave a very comprehensive presentation to a small group on the basics of birding. He included information on techniques, equipment, using bird guides, listing birds, and lifers. He talked about the importance of considering such things as habitat and bird groups when trying to pin down an identification. Finally, he gave a sampling of some of the most expected birds in New Brunswick, in various groups, such as sparrows, ducks, corvids, and warblers. Many thanks to Roger for his very useful presentation for anyone who is starting to get interested in birds and birding.  


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
CRESCENT MOON. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

MAYFLY. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

MILKWEED LEAF BEETLE. JUNE 16, 2018. RON STEEVES

MOON AND VENUS. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

WHITE-MARGINED BURROWER BUG NYMPHS. JUNE 12, 2018. PETER GADD

Saturday, 16 June 2018

June 16 2018

Nature Moncton Information Line….Saturday, June 16, 2018

To respond by email, please address your message to the Information Line Editor, nelson@nb.sympatico.ca

Please advise the Editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**Pam Novak from the Atlantic Wildlife Institute in Cookville shares some information on one of the young from the PEREGRINE FALCON [Faucon pèlerin] nest atop Assumption Place last year. One fledgling was badly damaged on one of its inaugural flights after crashing into the Assumption Place building. She sustained much damage to her beak and suffered from head trauma and mobility issues, and was captured and sent to the Atlantic Wildlife Institute. Rehabilitation happened but she was not ready to be released for migration last fall, so was overwintered at the facility. She was successfully released this spring, just a bit farther down the Petitcodiac River, with a photo of her flying off. Also attached is a photo of this bird shortly after it arrived to the rehab centre last year, and again in December of 2017 as healing was in progress, but note the wing, still problematic. This bird was released with a male who had suffered a fractured wing at the Hopewell Cape Rocks nest. A photo of these two together at the AWI aviary is attached and shows the gender size differential, with the female usually at least 25% larger, as is the case with most raptors. Pam’s rehab efforts must be very rewarding to her, with these beautiful raptors now off to fulfill their mission. Pam comments they treat at least one fledgling from the Assumption Place nest each summer, and are happy to return them home when they can, as this success story turned out.

**There are actually lots of them about, but the immature GRAY JAY [Mésangeai du Canada] is a bird we don’t often get to see before it takes on its mature plumage, usually in later summer and fall. They retain a sooty immature plumage for that period, very different from their parents. Holly Frazer, who lives near Rogersville, was very fortunate to have an immature Gray Jay visit her suet feeder, and captured some documentary photos. A lucky landlady indeed.

**Krista Doyle has been noting a lone doe WHITE-TAILED DEER [Chevreuil] by her Lewis Mountain home recently, and it appeared in the yard on Friday to show off its new fawn, showing no anxiety at doing so, by Krista’s photos of the event.

**Aldo Dorio took a photo of an adult COMMON LOON [Plongeon huard] still in the salt water off Hay Island on Friday morning. Usually adults are on freshwater lakes by this time of the season, setting up housekeeping.

**Brian Stone visited Mapleton Park on Friday to find a fresh ARCTIC SKIPPER BUTTERFLY [Échiquier], 
CANADIAN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLY [Papillon tigré du Canada], CEDAR WAXWINGS [Jaseur d'Amérique] foraging on HONEYSUCKLE [Chèvrefeuille] blossoms, a colourful TWICE-STABBED STINK BUG [nom scientifique Cosmopepla lintneriana], a SPOTTED SANDPIPER [Chevalier grivelé] in the big pond, BLUE FLAG [Iris sauvage] in bloom, a CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER [Paruline à flancs marron], and great MALLARD duckling [Canard colvert] photos.

**The warmer nights seem to be bringing out the big guys to my moth sheet. A big beautiful POLYPHEMUS MOTH [Polyphème d’Amérique] dropped by Friday night.

Nelson Poirier
Nature Moncton
 
ARCTIC SKIPPER BUTTERFLY. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

ARCTIC SKIPPER BUTTERFLY. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

BEAVERPOND BASKETTAIL DRAGONFLY. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

BLUE FLAG IRIS. JUNE 15, 2018.  BRIAN STONE

CANADIAN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLY. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

CEDAR WAXWING. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

CEDAR WAXWING. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

COMMON LOON. JUNE 15, 2018. ALDO DORIO

GRAY JAY (JUVENILE). JUNE 11, 2018. HOLLY FRAZER 

GRAY JAY (JUVENILE). JUNE 11, 2018. HOLLY FRAZER 

MALLARD  DUCKLINGS. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

MALLARD DUCK AND DUCKLINGS. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

PEREGRINE FALCONS IN REHAB READY FOR RELEASE. MAY,2018. PAM NOVAK

PEREGRINE FALCON IN REHAB.DEC 6, 2017. PAM NOVAK

PEREGRINE FALCON IN REHAB.JULY 14, 2017. PAM NOVAK

PEREGRINE FALCON RELEASE. MAY, 2018. BARBARA BRUSH

POLYPHEMUS MOTH. JUNE 16, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

SPOTTED SANDPIPER. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

TWICE-STABBED STINKBUG. JUNE 15, 2018. BRIAN STONE

WHITE-TAILED DEER FAWN. JUNE 15, 2018. KRISTA DOYLE 

WHITE-TAILED DEER DOE AND FAWN. JUNE 15, 2018. KRISTA DOYLE 

WHITE-TAILED DEER DOE AND FAWN. JUNE 15, 2018. KRISTA DOYLE 

Friday, 15 June 2018

June 15 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, June 15, 2018 (Friday)


 Please advise editor at nelson@nb.sympatico.ca if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca.

** A last reminder of the Nature Moncton workshop, “What’s that Bird?” to happen tomorrow, Saturday June 16th that will include a viewing of the PEREGRINE FALCON [Faucon pèlerin] nest with its chicks and potential other unannounced surprises.  The write-up is attached.

Nature Moncton Workshop and Outing
Date: June 16th, 2018
Time: 9:00 am (workshop); outing in the afternoon
Location: Tankville School
Leader: Roger Leblanc
Cost: $8.00
WHAT’S THAT BIRD???

Are you just getting started in bird watching and asking yourself these kinds of questions:
-  Where do I start to identify a bird? There are so many.
-  What about guides, apps, sites and equipment? What should I get?
   And once I have the toys what should I do with them?
- What about places to bird? Field vs.feeders.
- Where do I find what bird?
- Where do I find help out there?
- How do I get better at birding?

Nature Moncton recognizes that a lot of new bird enthusiasts are joining our ranks but also that it’s not easy getting started.  In order to share the great pleasure and sense of accomplishment one gets from learning to know birds and nature better, we are offering a birding workshop for beginners with our own Roger Leblanc. Roger, a well known birder and bird expert with more than 20 years of experience, will explore all these questions with you and any others you might have. He will also share with you his expertise on finding and identifying birds as well as many tips on various aspects of bird watching. And after a couple of hours indoors talking about birds and birding, we will put it all together by --“YES” -- going birding together. At this point you can put your newfound know-how to the test in the field again with the help of Roger. As many have said, bird watching is all about time spent in the field and so we will go out to see what the nesting season has in store for us. Some extra binoculars and scopes will be available.
All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not.



** As Margaret Forster recently reported to Nature NB, she has ONE-FLOWERED CANCER ROOT blooming at the moment in her front yard.  This is a rare parasitic plant in New Brunswick that is parasitic on many different plants, usually found in damp thickets, woods, and meadows.  It is very special to have this plant appear in the Forster’s yard on Coburn St. in Fredericton.  It’s amongst Goldenrod, about a meter from the curb of the street and a meter from the driveway.  This is the first year they have seen it there, and it is in bloom at the moment.  Margaret shares a photo that is attached to today’s edition.

** Sybil Wentzell shares some nice recent nature photos.  A trip to Kouchibouquac National Park gave them the chance to watch several BLACK BEARS [Ours noir].  They were eating the fresh green grass in the ditch along the highway in the park.  And from Sybil’s photo, we can see that they are very much enjoying the spring salad.  A pair of pink LADY SLIPPERS [Cypripéde royal] pose nicely.  Sybil also got a photo of an OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER [Moucherolle à côtés olive] just off New Ireland Rd. in Albert County.  They heard it calling to draw their attention to it.  This species is becoming more difficult to locate as its numbers are in decline.

** Pat Fox shares an EASTERN CHIPMUNK [Suisse] incident that makes her want more around.  A flock of juvenile EUROPEAN STARLINGS [Étourneau sansonnet] arrived at her feeder to gobble down in Starling fashion.  A resident Chipmunk was not amused and grabbed one of the young Starlings and the fight was on.  The whole flock left and have so far chosen not to return.  Pat’s Chipmunk is not for rent!

** For those who want to make a 2nd visit to the Festival of Nature, held on June 1st, 2nd and 3rd, Brian Stone has made a full album of photos which can be viewed at the attached link.

** Krista Doyle photographed a WHITE-TAILED DEER [Cerf de Virginie] in her Lewis Mountain yard on Thursday.  This doe is losing her thick winter coat to take on the finer chestnut pelage of summer.  Note the patches of denuded hair and the now loose winter pelage dropping off, giving a bit of a temporary shaggy look.

** In May, Carmella and Leopold Melanson went on their yearly trip to Ontario to  visit family and do some birding at the same time.  They had 148 bird species for the trip.  In addition to the usual birding stops this year, they visited the Bird Studies Canada headquarters, Long Point Bird Observatory and the Prince Edward Bird Observatory.  They really enjoyed seeing how the banding of birds was done, from when the birds are caught in the net to when they’re released again a short time after.  Staff at the banding stations told them that they typically band about 150 birds in a morning.  A visit to one of the banding stations is a very worthwhile stop.  There are lots of trails to explore there, especially at Long Point.  Attached are a few pictures of their trip that include AMERICAN AVOCET [Avocette d'Amérique], AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN [Pélican d’Amèrique], a YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER [Pic maculé] with a black crown, EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL [Engoulevent bois-pourri], KENTUCKY WARBLER [Paruline du Kentucky]; and a few birds were banded at the Prince Edward observatory while they were there to include GRAY CATBIRD [Moqueur chat], INDIGO BUNTING [Passerin indigo], a YELLOW WARBLER [Paruline jaune] being untangled by staff members and a YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER [Paruline à croupion jaune] caught in a net in a picture of the banding station at the Long Point Observatory.  Obviously a very worthwhile visit for folks going to Ontario.

** A labeling error is corrected in the BlogSpot of yesterday, June 14th.  The photos that were labeled as COMMON GRACKLE [Quiscale bronzé] are juvenile EUROPEAN STARLINGS [Étourneau sansonnet].  Several pointed out to note the rusty edges on many of the wing feathers that are actually typical of Starlings at any age as is the little black mask around the eye though it is not as evident in adults.   The straight pointed beak is typical of Starlings and the tail is much shorter in the Starling.  The bill of the Common Grackle is also slightly more down curved.

** I’m attaching some of the insect activity happening around our Miramachi camp.  One of the species of GIANT STONE FLY paid a visit.  It is one of the Pteronarcys species of which we have a few.  Their life cycle is mostly underwater and they go on a flight mission to mate and lay eggs, then pass on.  They get the common name GIANT STONE FLY or GIANT SALMON FLY.  Their presence is a good indication of clean-flowing rivers. 
The nights have been so cool that moths have not been coming to the moth light in numbers.  During the warm front on Tuesday night, some SPHINX moths started with several TWIN-SPOTTED SPHINX moths and a SMALL-EYED SPHINX.  Also three dragonflies did a pass by.  We have three SNAKETAILS that are very easy to identify from thorax and yellow abdomen markings.  The one that visited was a TWIN-SPOTTED SNAKETAIL [Cordulégastre maculé].  A BEAVERPOND BASKETTAIL [Épithèque canine] also visited.  It is our most common Baskettail species.  Note its fuzzy thorax to help narrow it down with other features to build a case.  The third was a male BELTED WHITEFACE [Leucorrhine apprivoisée] Dragonfly which was more of a challenge from photos as immature males are yellow in appearance like the females.

** This week’s Sky-at-a-Glance is added to this edition, courtesy of sky guru Curt Nason.  

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, June 16 - June 23

Seasons are the result of Earth’s rotational axis being tilted about 23.5 degrees off the vertical with respect to its orbit.  The first day of astronomical summer occurs this Thursday. The “astronomical” qualification is used because meteorologists have taken to confusing people with meteorological seasons based on temperatures. Meteorological summer in the northern hemisphere includes June, July and August because they have the highest average temperatures for the year. Anyone who has lost crops this month due to frost will not be in total agreement with that.

On the summer solstice, the Sun rises and sets at its most northerly points on the horizon. For those of us at 45 degrees latitude, at midday (1:21 pm in Moncton) the Sun is 90 - 45 + 23.5 = 68.5 degrees above the southern horizon, at its highest for the year. If we lived at latitude 23.5 degrees the Sun would be directly overhead at midday on the solstice. Several millennia ago the Sun was “in” the constellation Cancer on the solstice, hence that latitude is marked on maps as the Tropic of Cancer. The dim constellation does resemble a crab somewhat, but there is speculation that the Sun’s forth and back movement along the horizon at that time of year was reminiscent of a crab’s sidewise walk.

Prior to being in Cancer at the start of summer, the Sun was in Leo. Lions tended to gather by the Nile in the dry season around the solstice. Now the summer solstice point on the ecliptic, the Sun’s path through the constellations, lies in Taurus, just within its boundary with Gemini. The roaming solstice is due to Earth’s axis wobbling like a top, making one revolution every 25,800 years in what we call the precession of the equinox. Enjoy your summer, whenever it starts.

This Week in the Solar System
Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 5:27 am and sunset will occur at 9:12 pm, giving 15 hours, 45 minutes of daylight (5:35 am and 9:14 pm in Saint John).  Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 5:28 am and set at 9:14 pm, giving 15 hours, 46 minutes of daylight (5:36 am and 9:15 pm in Saint John). Summer solstice occurs at 7:07 am on Thursday.

The Moon is at first quarter on Wednesday, giving great views in a telescope throughout the week. If you can spot it in the east this Saturday morning, look for Venus within a binocular field above it. If you are successful with that, try for Venus without the binoculars. After twilight on Tuesday look for M44, the Beehive Cluster, just below Venus. Jupiter is situated for great observing in the evening and it will get extra attention on June 23 with the Moon nearby. A binocular view of Jupiter will show its line-up of moons and the double star Zubenelgenubi to its lower left. Saturn rises around 9:30 pm and a late evening view of it in binoculars will include the globular cluster M22 to its lower left. A dust storm has kicked up on Mars – hopefully, it will dissipate soon and not obscure features of the Red Planet like one did in 2001.

The first RASC NB star party of the year takes place at Kouchibouguac National Park on June 15-16. The last RASC NB meeting until September takes place on June 23 at 1 pm in Moncton High School. All are welcome.

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
AMERICAN AVOCET May 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN May 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

BEAVERPOND BASKETTAIL DRAGONFLY. JUNE 13, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

BELTED WHITEFACE DRAGONFLY (IMMATURE MALE). JUNE 13, 2018. NELSON POIRIER,

BELTED WHITEFACE DRAGONFLY (IMMATURE MALE). JUNE 13, 2018. NELSON POIRIER,

BLACK BEAR.JUNE 13, 2018. SYBIL WENTZELL

EASTERN WHIP-POOR-WILL May 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

GIANT STONEFLY AKA GIANT SALMONFLY (PTERONARCYS SP.) . JUNE 13, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

GRAY CATBIRD  Prince Edward Bird Observatory May 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

INDIGO BUNTING Prince Edward Bird Observatory May 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

KENTUCKY WARBLER May 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

Long Point Bird Observatory Banding station May 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

Midday Moncton

OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER. JUNE 13, 2018. SYBIL WENTZELL

ONE-FLOWERED CANCER ROOT. JUNE 9, 2018. MARGARET FORSTER

PINK LADY'S SLIPPERS. JUNE 13, 2018. SYBIL WENTZELL

TWIN-SPOTTED SPHINX MOTH . JUNE 13, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

TWIN-SPOTTED SPIKETAIL DRAGONFLY . JUNE 13, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

TWIN-SPOTTED SPIKETAIL DRAGONFLY . JUNE 13, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

WHITE-TAILED DEER. JUNE 14,2018. KRISTA DOYLE

YELLOW WARBLER Prince Edward Bird Observatory May 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER (FEMALE WITH BLACK CROWN) May 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER Prince Edward Bird Observatory CARMELLA MELANSON