Tuesday, 19 February 2019

Feb 19 2019


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE,
February 19, 2019 (Thursday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

Nature Moncton February meeting night happens tonight, Tuesday, Feb. 19 at the Mapleton Rotary Lodge at 7 p.m. This month we’ll take a closer look into the lives of our very common small rodents that we may not get to see very often, but play a very important role in the existence of some of the mammals and birds higher up the food chain, that we see more often and enjoy so much. Bring your own queries and experiences to share in this presentation. The write-up is below, from the website at Nature Moncton website at <www.naturemoncton.com>, with other upcoming events, should you wish to see what else is coming up.

Nature Moncton February Meeting
Our Small Rodent Community and Those That Depend on Them
Moncton Rotary Lodge, February 19, 2019 at 7:00 PM
Presenter: Nelson Poirier
The small rodents may be some of the most populous members of Mother Nature’s community and are no doubt some of the most significant members of that community in providing food to mammals and birds up the food chain that we all appreciate so much such as owls and other raptors as well as some of the larger wild mammals like foxes, wild cats, coyote, weasels, mink, etc.
As numerous as the small rodents are, we don’t often get to see them due to their secretive, nocturnal, and sometimes only ground-level life. Let’s spend a few moments in getting to know these smaller creatures by their first names and learn about their very interesting life and times. At the same time, let’s become aware of the critters whose existence depends upon the population of the small rodent community.

**Every year at the Annual Festival of Nature hosted by Nature New Brunswick, each nature group in the province makes up a box of items a naturalist would appreciate. These boxes are raffled off  in a silent auction. Nature Moncton members and friends are asked to bring in any items they would like to contribute to the monthly meetings to be assembled as a box for donation to the Festival of Nature event taking place in St. Andrew's  on June 7, 8 and 9. Nature Moncton meeting  is this tonight Tuesday night, February 19 and any contributed items will be assembled and appreciated.

The next item is directed and applies only to local membership community.
** The most important source of revenue to meet Nature Moncton's expenses is membership fees. This is what pays  for our meeting spot, web site, telephone line, Nature Moncton membership and other miscellaneous expenses. The membership fees are completely on the honour system and possibly many have forgotten to pay their membership fee this year. The membership chairperson would very much appreciate if those who have not updated their membership to go to the web site  at www.naturemoncton.com and click on Membership Application, where you can download and print a membership application. You can bring it to the monthly meeting tonight or mail it to the Nature Moncton mailbox with you cheque. These things are surly easy to forget. Check on it now if applicable.
Please ignore last message if not part of local Nature Moncton community.



Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton

Monday, 18 February 2019

Feb 18 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, 18 February 2019 (Monday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the info line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records consult the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at

Edited by: Nelson Poirier
Transcript by: David Christie
Info Line telephone number: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Brian Coyle shares more of the short videos captured on his trail camera. Three show a BOBCAT [Lynx roux] in different situations. On one occasion it is checking out a rock that a male fox had urine-marked earlier. Note the signature tail tip markings, of dark on top, white on bottom, to distinguish a Bobcat from a lynx. A Canada Lynx [Lynx du Canada] tail would be black top and bottom, as if dipped in ink. Note also the relatively small footpads, consistent with Bobcat.

Some other videos show a RED FOX [Renard roux] urine-marking a rock, as they do during their breeding season, which is on at the moment, and others of COYOTES [Coyote] checking out the rocks and moving about. These videos are all taken in a wooded area near Brian’s Lower Mountain Road home. Check out the videos at the sites below








** Wendy Sullivan had a VOLE [campagnol] visit her ground bird-feeding area on Sunday and got an excellent photo. Voles and shrews are very common around bird-feeder yards, but we seldom see them during the day to get a photo, as Wendy has. The timing is perfect to add one of Wendy’s photos to the Nature Moncton meeting presentation on small rodents tomorrow night, Tuesday. We’ll learn more then, on why Wendy’s visitor is a vole, not a mouse, shrew or mole.


** I’m attaching a few photos from the Sunday afternoon woods trail hike with the Miramichi Naturalists’ Club, led by Jim Saunders. Nip twigs are tips of conifer branches dropped to the ground by squirrels, to forage on the nutritious buds. The photo shows a nip twig that has been feasted on for those buds. Another photo shows the typical corky, rough bark of BLACK ASH [Frène noir], a tree prized by native people in the past, for basket weaving. It’s not an abundant tree at the moment. The third photo is of a cocoon that would have been housing the overwintering pupa of probably a moth; this one had been parasitized.


** A reminder of the Nature Moncton meeting tomorrow, Tuesday, Feb. 19, at 7 o’clock at the Mapleton Park Lodge, with a presentation on small rodents and wildlife so dependent on them. The write-up is at the website under Upcoming Events and will be repeated in full, in tomorrow morning’s message.



Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton



 
BLACK ASH BARK. FEB 17, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

COCOON. FEB 17, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

NIP TWIG SQUIRREL FORAGED. FEB 17, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

VOLE. FEB 17, 2019.  WENDY SULLIVAN

VOLE. FEB 17, 2019.  WENDY SULLIVAN

Sunday, 17 February 2019

Feb 17 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, February 17, 2019 (Sunday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, .

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at   .

Editor: Nelson Poirier  
Transcript by: David Christie  
Info Line telephone # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** One of the biggest compliments wildlife can pay to us, when we photograph them, is to ignore our presence. Jim Carroll came across a PORCUPINE [Porc-épic] snoozing in its penthouse overlooking the Black Beach Road, east of Saint John, on Saturday. It showed no interest in Jim’s presence. Note its long guard hairs are arranged with no quills in sight, being laid flat, that indicates “no problem” and "all is well".

** The RIVER OTTER [Loutre de rivière] is a very interesting member of Mother Nature’s community that is active all winter. It is nocturnal and secretive but can be very inquisitive, to the point of being bold. Jim Saunders came across one, and possibly two, popping out of an open area near a stream into the Miramichi River on Saturday. A Miramichi Naturalists’ Club trip to the area today, Sunday afternoon, will hopefully get an audience.



** This coming Tuesday evening is Nature Moncton February meeting night at the Mapleton Rotary Lodge at 7 p.m. This month we’ll take a closer look into the lives of our very common small rodents that we may not get to see very often, but play a very important role in the existence of some of the mammals and birds higher up the food chain, that we see more often and enjoy so much. Bring your own queries and experiences to share in this presentation. The write-up is below, from the website at Nature Moncton website at <www.naturemoncton.com>, with other upcoming events, should you wish to see what else is coming up.

Nature Moncton February Meeting
Our Small Rodent Community and Those That Depend on Them
Moncton Rotary Lodge, February 19, 2019 at 7:00 PM
Presenter: Nelson Poirier
The small rodents may be some of the most populous members of Mother Nature’s community and are no doubt some of the most significant members of that community in providing food to mammals and birds up the food chain that we all appreciate so much such as owls and other raptors as well as some of the larger wild mammals like foxes, wild cats, coyote, weasels, mink, etc.
As numerous as the small rodents are, we don’t often get to see them due to their secretive, nocturnal, and sometimes only ground-level life. Let’s spend a few moments in getting to know these smaller creatures by their first names and learn about their very interesting life and times. At the same time, let’s become aware of the critters whose existence depends upon the population of the small rodent community.




Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
PORCUPINE.FEBRUARY 16, 2019. JIM CARROLL

PORCUPINE.FEBRUARY 16, 2019. JIM CARROLL

RIVER OTTER. FEB 16, 2019. JIM SAUNDERS

Saturday, 16 February 2019

Feb 16 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, 16 February 2019 (Saturday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor,
nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the info line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the  website at www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

**Rhéal Vienneau reports some great news on the overwintering MONARCH BUTTERFLIES [Monarque]. Rhéal shared a report that the Monarchs that are in a small area in Mexico have been extremely active and exhibiting behaviours not typically seen until March. The clustering butterflies in Mexico at the moment cover 14.9 acres (6.05 hectares) of forest. This is the highest recorded since 2006, and an increase of 144% from last winter. The second western migratory population that overwinters in California is not doing as well. Rhéal comments this information came from “Journey North”  https://journeynorth.org/. Let’s hope the weather will cooperate for the upcoming March northward migration. They will need lots of MILKWEED [Asclépiade] when they arrive in Texas.

**Karen Renton reports that good numbers of both EVENING GROSBEAKS [Gros-bec errant] and PINE GROSBEAKS [Durbec des sapins] are still in the numbers they were on the bird feeder tour in late January at their Stilesville feeder yard. However, Wednesday gave the first arrival of a flock of 30 COMMON REDPOLLS [Sizerin flammé]. This very likely means wild food of mainly Birch catkins [chatons de Bouleau] may be starting to wane, with them coming to a rural feeder. We have high numbers of Redpolls at our urban feeder, but they don’t have the option of nearby Birch catkins, as they would in Stilesville.

**This week’s Sky at a Glance is included with this edition, courtesy of sky guru Curt Nason, and Mother Nature is forecasting some clear winter nights ahead to enjoy it.

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, 2019 February 16 – February 23
By the time I was ten I had been into astronomy for a year or two, thanks in part to a fascination with mythology. That summer I suffered through advertisements for the movie Jason and the Argonauts, knowing I wouldn’t get to Saint John to see it and it likely wouldn’t get to the Vogue theatre in McAdam for 20 years. Twenty years later the Vogue was closed and I was living in Saint John, but I finally saw the movie after buying the VHS tape. Throughout the year I get to see some of the tale in the constellations.

One of the 48 constellations in Ptolemy’s second century star chart was Argo Navis, the ship that carried the Argonauts to their adventures. The constellation was large, too large for the astronomers who designated the 88 constellations that now fill our sky, and they broke it up into three: Carina the Keel, Vela the Sails, and Puppis the Poop Deck or Stern. The first is below our southern horizon and just the tip of the sails rises, but a good chunk of Puppis is seen on winter evenings. It is the stars just behind the tail of Orion’s big dog, Canis Major, and perhaps that is why it is called the poop deck. Nicolaus Louis de Lacaille, an 18th century astronomer, had unofficially dismantled Argo Navis into these constellations and made the ship’s mast into the constellation of Pyxis, the Compass.

Some of the Argonauts are also in the sky, particularly Hercules, who is rising around midnight, and the Gemini twins Castor and Pollux. Also present are the musician Orpheus, represented by his harp Lyra, and the healer Asclepius who is depicted by Ophiuchus. The Golden Fleece, which the Argonauts sought, is represented in the sky by Aries the Ram. Draco is sometimes regarded as the vigilant dragon that guarded the Golden Fleece.

This Week in the Solar System
Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 7:20 am and sunset will occur at 5:46 pm, giving 10 hours, 26 minutes of daylight (7:24 am and 5:52 pm in Saint John). Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 7:09 am and set at 5:56 pm, giving 10 hours, 47 minutes of daylight (7:11 am and 6:04 pm in Saint John).

The Moon is near the Beehive star cluster (M44) on late Sunday evening, and it is at perigee on Tuesday just nine hours before being opposite the Sun in the sky. Being imperceptibly larger as the closest full Moon of the year, it is most noticeable in the extent of the Bay of Fundy tides over the following two days. Over the first half of the week, Venus slides above and to the left of Saturn in the morning sky, stealing attention away from Jupiter to their upper right. Mercury starts to make its presence known in the early evening, setting 80 minutes after the Sun midweek in its best evening apparition for the year. Starting late in the week, and for the next two weeks, look for a subtle cone of light stretching from the horizon toward Mars, about 45-90 minutes after sunset. Caused by sunlight reflecting off dust within the ecliptic, seeing the zodiacal light requires a clear sky untainted by light pollution.

Conditions permitting, the annual Moonlight Snowshoe Hike and stargazing at Sheldon Point barn in Saint John takes place on February 16 at 7 pm. The provincial astronomy club, RASC NB, meets on February 23 at 1 pm in UNB Fredericton Forestry - Earth Sciences building. All are welcome.

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.




Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
Puppis

Thursday, 14 February 2019

Feb 14 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, February 14, 2019 (Thursday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

Please advise editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at
www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com.

Happy Valentine’s Day to all Lovebirds flying about!

** Lots of birds must have been very happy to find well-stocked feeders for a mid-February storm as we experienced on Wednesday.  Dave Christie reports that the BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES [Mésange à tête noire] and sparrows were in a feeding frenzy.  His sparrow line-up includes WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS [Bruant à gorge blanche], DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoisé] , one SONG SPARROW [Bruant chanteur] and one SAVANNAH SPARROW [Bruant des prés].  He was a bit surprised to have only one BLUE JAY [Geai bleu] and one MOURNING DOVE [Tourterelle triste] come by on Wednesday.  Dave comments he did see the first flock of 75 SNOW BUNTINGS [Bruant des neiges] that he’s seen since December.  They were foraging on the marsh weed seeds that had been exposed after the very high moon tides.  The marsh had previously been covered by heavy snow, and no doubt will be again that way today.

Elaine Gallant was able to a photo of her Flying Squirrel patron to her Parlee Beach feeder yard enjoying a suet block which must have given it some great calories to get through the storm. Properties on the photo say it was taken at 4:19 AM. A lucky in the dark photo. Obviously squirrel and Elaine were doing the night shift!

** At my own feeders, 75+ COMMON REDPOLLS [Sizerin flammé] with AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune] and PINE SISKINS [Tarin des pins] trying to work their way in which made the feeders look like a beehive.  The sparrows were content with grabbing quick droppings below before they got covered, and the expected regulars were forced to wait out their turn.  The RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER [Pic à ventre roux] was not seen all day, so must have felt the congestion just a bit too much for him.

** I attended the Salisbury Naturalist Club meeting on Tuesday night when the presenter was Cheyenne Currie from the New Brunswick Nature Trust.  It was an extremely interesting presentation that dealt a lot with the Acadian forest and its specific trees and mammals.  They have 52 protected sites, protected in various ways across New Brunswick, covering 7,000 acres.  Three local ones are the 48 acres on Grindstone Island, 74 acres of Cape Enrage Beech and Marshland, and the Mapleton old growth forest site in Elgin which makes up part of the 1% of New Brunswick left in old growth forest.  That site needs Nature Moncton to visit it as a group at different times of year, but of course can be visited by individuals at any time.


nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton


FLYING SQUIRREL. FEB 13, 2019. ELAINE GALLANT.



Wednesday, 13 February 2019

Feb 13 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, February 13, 2019 ( Wednesday)
To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to
http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca'
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com. Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com.
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com.
Transcript by: Judy Marsh   marshj@nbnet.nb.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397"(384-NEWS)

** Sarah Chouinard-Horne is hosting 100 plus EVENING GROSBEAK [Gros-bec errant] to her feeder yard in the Willow Grove area of Saint John. One bird really stands out with the over expression of yellow plumage. This is a relatively rare, usually genetic quirk called xanthochroism. It can occur in other birds and animals when expected pigmented areas are replaced with yellow . I have had photos sent to me of this condition a few times in the years when EVENING GROSBEAK [Gros-bec errant] were prevalent in New Brunswick, but this is the only one I am aware of this year of the abundant EVENING GROSBEAK [Gros-bec errant] that are in New Brunswick. I did have one of these birds at my own feeder yard, more years ago than I care to admit. Pat saw it when I was at work and was said there was a different bird with the EVENING GROSBEAK [Gros-bec errant] flock that almost looked like a COCKATIEL or LOVEBIRD. It came and went that year. Sarah reports that her bird is a regular, seeing it every couple of days or so. Lucky landlady!

**There has been a lot more comments on RED FOX [Renard roux] activity recently, as their mating season is in full swing and roaming about more and seen more during the day at this time of year. Yolande LeBlanc in Memramcook comments she is enjoying watching one which seems to have adopted a favourite hay bale in a field below her Memramcook home and is seen frequently around it or snoozing on top of it. On Tuesday especially, it enjoyed stretching out on the top of the bale soaking up the sun's rays making sure it's vitamin D needs were met.Yolande also comments on COMMON REDPOLL [Sizerin flammé], PINE SISKIN [Tarin des pins] and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune] interaction. She has two separate feeding areas and if the COMMON REDPOLL [Sizerin flammé] are at one the AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune] are at the other, seeming to make it obvious they do not care to feed together. Yolande notes the PINE SISKIN [Tarin des pins] will sometimes join both species at some of the feeders, but the AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune] seem to make it apparent that three is just a crowd. I have exactly the same scenario at my own feeder yard. They don't seem to get in disputes, but the AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune] are definitely  not amused with the COMMON REDPOLL [Sizerin flammé] ,feeding at different times, where as the PINE SISKIN [Tarin des pins] seem to join both.
**Lisa Morris photographed the rough black growth of the fungal infection, (Angiosporina morbosa) commonly seen on trees of the prunus genus. We tend to notice them much more often on wild cherry trees. Many trees seem to survive heavy infestations, but it can kill branches, by cutting off circulation past the growths which then provide habitat for insects.
**Every year at the Annual Festival of Nature hosted by Nature New Brunswick, each nature group in the province makes up a basket of items a naturalist would appreciate. These baskets are raffled off  in a silent auction. Nature Moncton members and friends are asked to bring in any items they would like to contribute to the monthly meetings to be assembled as a box for donation to the Festival of Nature event taking place in St. Andrew's  on June 7, 8 and 9. Our next meeting  is this coming Tuesday night on February 19.


nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton



 
BLACK KNOT FUNGUS GROWTHS (APIOSPORINA MORBOSA). FEB 12, 2019.  LISA MORRIS

BLACK KNOT FUNGUS GROWTHS (APIOSPORINA MORBOSA). FEB 12, 2019.  LISA MORRIS

EVENING GROSBEAK (XANTHOCHROISM). FEB 12, 2019

EVENING GROSBEAK (XANTHOCHROISM). FEB 12, 2019

Tuesday, 12 February 2019

Feb 12 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, February 12, 2019 (Tuesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

Please advise editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at
www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com.

** The Salisbury Naturalist group invites anyone to join them at their February meeting scheduled for tonight, Tuesday, February 12th at 7:00 at the Salisbury Parks and Leisure Office which is across from the JMA Armstrong High School.  The write-up for the speaker, Cheyanne Currie on the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is attached below.

Salisbury Naturalists Presentation
Tuesday February 12, 2019 @ 7 pm at the Salisbury Parks & Leisure Office
Cheyenne Currie, Engagement Coordinator at the Nature Trust of New Brunswick, will be joining the Salisbury Naturalists to discuss the importance of land conservation in our province.  Established in 1987, the Nature Trust of New Brunswick is a charitable land conservation organization that is responsible for conserving over 7000 acres in more than 50 beautiful and diverse nature preserves.
Cheyenne’s presentation will focus on the importance of the Acadian forest, why this forest type is endangered and how New Brunswickers can contribute to conservation efforts through the Nature Trust’s Landowner Stewardship program.  If you are unable to attend the session and would like to learn more about the Nature Trust and environmental stewardship, feel free to contact Cheyenne at cheyenne.currie@ntnb.org or visit the Nature Trust website (http://www.naturetrust.nb.ca).


** The Nature Moncton Gull Workshop and Field Trip scheduled for this coming Saturday, February 16th, has been postponed due to impending weather forecasts which could lead to poor conditions at the landfill site.  A rescheduled date for March 2nd is now proposed.  An announcement will go out nearer to the rescheduled date.  To repeat, this Saturday’s Gull Workshop is postponed.

** Gordon Rattray continues to have two BROWN CREEPERS [Grimpereau brun] as regular daily patrons to his homemade peanut butter feeder at his Weldon yard.  He took photos of them together to look for any indication of them being a pair which is suggestive.  Gender difference is inconclusive and guides do not indicate any gender differential.  Gordon also came across a flock of approximately 50 COMMON REDPOLLS [Sizerin flammé] at the Grey Brook Marsh area last Saturday in a feeding frenzy on the seeds in the catkins of White Birch.

** Mac Wilmot found some PUSSY WILLOW buds showing their hairy white winter covering after the bud scale had fallen off.  This bud is not in flower yet; however, if the branch is put into water inside the house, it will indeed burst into flower.  In the Pussy Willow, male and female reproductive catkins are on different shrubs.  If a male, it will burst into a yellow spray from which yellow pollen will fall; if a female shrub, it will open into a green spray which in nature will accept male pollen to form a seed cluster. 
Mac also reports Dale Gaskin saw his shadow on Groundhog Day, so all is well and downhill from here – well, at least in Dawson Settlement!

** Elaine Gallant reports her Parlee Beach feeder yard is active and becoming more so.  The PINE SISKIN [Tarin des pins] and COMMON REDPOLL [Sizerin flammé] numbers are swelling, and she suspects 8 different woodpeckers are coming, one of those being a NORTHERN FLICKER [Pic flamboyant].  However, the star of the show has been at least one FLYING SQUIRREL [Grand polatouche] that comes very late at night.  She saw it on Sunday night at midnight munching on a suet block in the announced -25 °C  wind chill temperature, to show the hardiness of the Northern Flying Squirrel.  There’s also a Southern Flying Squirrel to the south of us.  Elaine suspects her patrons use a wooded area near her where a tentative plan for a 600 site camp ground is to be located which could change things a lot for her feeder yard.

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
BROWN CREEPERS. FEB 8,2019. GORDON RATTRAY

COMMON REDPOLL. FEB 8,2019. GORDON RATTRAY

PUSSY WILLOW BUDS EXPOSED. FEB 11, 2019. MAC WILMOT