Thursday, 26 January 2023

 

 

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

Jan 26, 2023

 

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

Proofreading courtesy of Louise Nichols at nicholsl@eastlink.ca

 

 

 

**Jamie Burris shares some recent photos from their Riverview backyard bird feeding area. Their Dark-eyed Junco population remains at 10 but they all scattered with the appearance of 2 Sharp-shinned Hawks on Friday. A White-throated Sparrow arrived on Saturday and on Wednesday they had a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker on the seed bell. The male Northern Flicker continues to visit as well.

(Editor’s note: a Yellow-bellied Sapsucker is very much a winter bonus to have as a patron at a birdfeeder yard!).

 

**Clarence Cormier in Grande Digue is yet another lucky birdfeeder to be patronized by a winter-residing Northern Flicker to cooperate for a pleasant photo as it enjoyed a suet offering.

 

**John Massey in Dieppe shares an interesting observation with White-tailed Deer and Old Man’s Beard (Usnea) Lichen

John had a 65-foot dead spruce tree taken down which was almost covered with usnea lichen much like a decorated Christmas tree. The next day the branches of the spruce which were accessible were completely stripped of the lichen by White-tailed Deer. Since he wanted to use the dead wood in his stove, he untangled some more branches and leaned some against a tree, and scattered some along his driveway. Next morning, not a lichen to be seen. John has witnessed White-tailed Deer standing on their hind legs many times to pick off this lichen from trees around his property.


 **Shirley and Bob Childs had a Blue Jay come right up to within inches of their window on the recent very stormy day to check on the menu. The majority of Blue Jays migrate south for the winter but more seem to be lingering this year and possibly more interested in human handouts.

 

 All 5 Barred Owl nest boxes donated by Scott Makepeace are in the hands of new landlords to be erected very soon and waiting for patrons. Stay tuned! 

 

Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

 

 

 

YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER. JAN 25, 2023. JAMIE BURRIS

NORTHERN FLICKER. JAN 25, 2023. CLARENCE CORMIER

WHITE-THROATED SPARROW AND DARK-EYED JUNCO. JAN 25, 2023. JAMIE BURRIS

DARK-EYED JUNCO. JAN 20, 2023. JAMIE BURRIS

BLUE JAY. JAN 23, 2023. BOB CHILDS

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK. JAN 21, 2023. JAMIE BURRIS

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK. JAN 21, 2023. JAMIE BURRIS

 

Wednesday, 25 January 2023

Jan 25 2023

 

 

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

Jan 25, 2023

 

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

Proofreading courtesy of Louise Nichols at nicholsl@eastlink.ca

 

 

 

** As a heads up to be ready for this Saturday’s Nature Moncton round of several wharf areas, check out the write up below:

NATURE MONCTON FIELD TRIP

Winter Bird Life around Northumberland Strait Wharfs

Date:        Saturday, January 28th (rain date: January 29th)

 

Time:       8:30 AM to late afternoon (or as long as folks want to go)

 

Meeting Place:  Behind Burger King at Champlain Mall (8:15 AM)

 

Driving time to Cap Lumière: About 50 minutes

                         

Guide: Roger Leblanc

 

In most people’s minds winter, birds and wharfs would not necessarily go together.  But in a seasoned New Brunswick birder’s way of thinking these 3 words totally link together to bring up visions of great observations.  And this winter, greater ice-free conditions on the Northumberland Strait make wharfs, which are logically placed on points jutting out into the water, great look-out spots for sea birds.  Also, sometimes when conditions are right, they can become places where sea birds (and others) might just take cover and be much closer for an observer to watch or take photos.  So always on the look for interesting and timely bird outings for members, Nature Moncton is proposing a tour of the wharfs on Saturday January 28th.  Under the expert lead of Roger Leblanc (who some have called a regular wharf-birding rat) we will explore several wharfs on the Northumberland Strait coast from Cap Lumière to Pointe-du-Chêne.  On this approximately 60 km stretch of coast there are 10 wharfs, demonstrating the importance of the fishing industry in the region.  Of these we will try to visit 5 or 6, depending on what we find and how long we want to go.  At this time of year, sea ducks should be a given, but many other species of sea and land birds are often attracted by the special features of wharfs and their environment.  So pick up your equipment, dress warmly, bring a lunch and lots of enthusiasm and come join us for a fun day of bird-watching photography and nature camaraderie on a wharf-hopping adventure along the coast of the Northumberland Strait.
 

All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not.

 

**Jasmine Deturralde was able to capture a photo of a male Northern Cardinal in Suzanne Rousseau’s Sussex yard using a cell phone through binoculars. An interesting way to capture photos!

Suzanne also has the local White-tailed Deer enjoying the menu in her birdfeeder yard as suspect many others will in communities where the White-tailed Deer population is very interested in birdfeeder yards.

 

**Gordon Rattray found that the recent weather brought many birds to his Weldon feeders.  On Monday Gordon had his first of-year American Tree Sparrow and on Tuesday he had 6 more join in.  Gordon also had several Dark-eyed Juncos and a single White-throated Sparrow.  Gordon also includes a photo of his ever-present Brown Creeper.

 

** Brian Stone noticed that the sky was clear once again on Tuesday evening and took the opportunity to photograph the 12% full Waxing Crescent Moon and the conjunction (two days past the closest approach, darn it) of the planets Venus and Saturn. While photographing the planets Brian noticed that Venus looked a bit stretched out and with closer magnification through binoculars he realized that Venus was displaying a rare effect of "Light Pillars". The Sun frequently produces light pillars but only the brightest planets can produce pillars and only very rarely. Witnessing this display ranks highly on Brian's list of special events. High-level ice crystals in a very thin layer of cirrus clouds are the creator of this effect and now Brian's satisfaction levels are topped up and should last for a few days at least.

 

 https://atoptics.co.uk/halo/venpill.htm

 

 

 

 

Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

 

 

 

NORTHERN CARDINAL. JAN 23, 2023. JASMINE DETURRALDE

BROW CREEPER, JAN 24, 2023. GORDON RATTRAY

WHITE-THROATED SPARROW, JAN 24, 2023. GORDON RATTRAY

AMERICAN TREE SPARROW, JAN 24, 2023. GORDON RATTRAY

AMERICAN TREE SPARROW, JAN 24, 2023. GORDON RATTRAY

DARK-EYED JUNCO, JAN 24, 2023. GORDON RATTRAY

WHITE-TAILED DEER. JAN 23, 2023. SUZANNE ROUSSEAU

SHREW OR DEER MOUSE HOLE AND TRAIL. JAN. 24, 2023. BRIAN STONE


SHREW OR DEER MOUSE HOLE. JAN. 24, 2023. BRIAN STONE


MOON (WAXING CRESCENT 12_ FULL). JAN. 24, 2023. BRIAN STONE

VENUS (EXHIBITING PILLARS). JAN. 24, 2023. BRIAN STONE

VENUS (EXHIBITING PILLARS) AND SATURN. JAN. 24, 2023. BRIAN STONE

VENUS (EXHIBITING PILLARS). JAN. 24, 2023. BRIAN STONE

ICE CRYSTALS. JAN. 24, 2023. BRIAN STONE

 

Sunday, 22 January 2023

Jan 23 2023

 

 

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

Jan 23, 2023

 

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

Proofreading courtesy of Louise Nichols at nicholsl@eastlink.ca

 

 

 

** On Sunday morning, a Sharp-shinned Hawk decided to visit David and Anita Cannon’s feeder station. They noticed it as one of the patrons, a Red-Breasted Nuthatch, flew into their bay window at a high speed, stunning itself while simultaneously making quite a loud bang. The hawk, 31 cm in length (12.4") as per the dimensions of the feeder directly underneath it, sat around for five minutes while the Red-Breasted Nuthatch hung upside down outside their window. Four minutes after the hawk departed, the nuthatch righted itself and flew off.

 

**Nicole Ferris is yet another of the birdfeeder yards enjoying the presence of Evening Grosbeaks this season at her Canaan Forks feeder station. They have been gradually increasing over the past few seasons but this one has been special.

As a memory of summer, Nicole shares a photo of a Lobster Mushroom she gathered that Nicole, like many others, enjoys as a  choice wild edible.

 

** Pat Gibbs comments it seems that the happy Ring-necked Pheasant family of Mom, Dad, 3 males, and 4 females that hatched and grew up in her yard are now at odds.  The days are slightly longer, and it seems the males have started fighting over territory in preparation for the spring mating season. Probably all the males but one will be driven away from her yard soon and she will be sad to see them go but for now, they are making for some exciting action in her garden. (Editor’s note: lengthening days make wildlife start to think of  family planning)

Take a look at the action at the video link below:

 

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/v7l4b02j778ii45/Pat%20Gibbs%20Pheasants.mp4?dl=0

 

Pat Gibbs took notice when the Blog mentioned Brian's chilly challenges on astronomy photos on cold nights and she found something which may make quite a difference with comfort level on cold nights and quite potentially cold days as well. Some others may well be interested in what Pat found. Check it out at the link below:

 

https://utwpods.com/products/photopod 

 

**Lisa Morris noticed a few tracks in the woods snowshoeing (not on a trail) in Kent County. She photographed one track trail that appears to be that of a Porcupine. Porcupine trails often show a tail drag and sometimes evidence of urine staining. Neither appears in Lisa’s photo so very open to other suggestions. There were lots of Snowshoe Hare tracks and a few White-tailed Deer.

Lisa also photographed a snag tree that appeared to be worked on by a Pileated Woodpecker.

A photo of a very clean nest cavity opening in an Aspen tree suggested it may be getting winter use with Flying Squirrels being a possibility.

 

**Brian Stone sends a photo of the Sun from Sunday morning showing the giant Sunspot AR3190 that is slowly moving across the face of the Sun. Brian was hoping for a clear day to occur before the sunspot went around and behind the Sun and on Sunday (an apt day for Sun photography) Brian finally got his wish. He used a mylar solar filter taped across the front lens of his camera as direct, magnified sunlight streaming through the camera lens can damage it and might not be good for the camera sensor either, not to mention the serious damage it would do to the human eye if not filtered properly. He also used only the camera's LCD screen to view to prevent exposure to any possible and disastrous light leakage from his home made solar filter.

 

https://soho.nascom.nasa.gov/sunspots/

 

 

 

Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

 

 

 

 

 

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK. JAN 22, 2023.  DAVID CANNON

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK. JAN 22, 2023.  DAVID CANNON

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH (REVIVING ITSELF). JAN 22, 2023.   DAVID CANNON

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH (REVIVING ITSELF). JAN 22, 2023.   DAVID CANNON

EVENING GROSBEAKS, NOV 20, 2022. NICOLE FERRIS

EVENING GROSBEAKS, NOV 20, 2022. NICOLE FERRIS

PILEATED WOODPECKER WORKINGS. JAN 22, 2022. LISA MORRIS

TREE NEST CAVITY. JAN 22, 2023. LISA MORRIS

PORCUPINE TRAIL (SUSPECTED). JAN 22, 2023. LISA MORRIS

PORCUPINE TRAIL (SUSPECTED). JAN 22, 2023. LISA MORRIS

SUNSPOT. JAN. 22, 2023. BRIAN STONE

SUNSPOT. JAN. 22, 2023. BRIAN STONE

 

Jan 22 2023

 

 

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

Jan 22, 2023

 

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

Proofreading courtesy of Louise Nichols at nicholsl@eastlink.ca

 

**Susan Atkinson shares some very interesting information she came across regarding a major achievement for the Town of Sackville. This may not open completely but the special news is there.

Sackville, N.B., scores prestigious UN wetland accreditation in a Canadian first

 

This will be the first town in North America to be accredited as a United Nations Ramsar City Wetland Site

By Sophie Price

 


 

The 55-acre Sackville Waterfowl Park was the main inspiration for the Sackville accreditation. (Photo: Sackville Tourism)

 

Come on over, the water’s fine! At least it is in Sackville, N.B., which recently received international recognition for its efforts to protect and restore wetlands.

The town is the first in North America to be accredited as a United Nations Ramsar City Wetland Site, an honour Ron Kelly Spurles, manager of tourism and business development in Sackville, describes as the “Academy Awards for Wetlands.” Wetland City Accreditations are given every three years under the UN convention that recognizes the conservation of wetlands of national and international significance.

The scheme “encourages cities to highlight and strengthen their positive relationship with wetlands as valuable ecosystems that provide multiple benefits to its citizens,” said Jay Aldous, Deputy Secretary-General of the Convention on Wetlands. It also gives cities international recognition and publicity — and possibly a boost in tourism — for protecting their wetlands.

 

 

 

**On Saturday afternoon Brian Stone visited Irishtown Nature Park for a short walk in the new, fresh snow. The scenery was excellent with snow covered trees and trails. Alongside the trails snowballs pushed over by the plows rolled down the banks making dotted trails. Wildlife was scarce though and all that managed to get photographed were Red-breasted Nuthatches and Black-capped Chickadees. Some interesting tree fungus was coating an old trunk to a large extent.

 

**Early on Sunday morning ... at 1:30 am ... Brian Stone drove out to a dark area on the Indian Mountain Rd. to view the new Comet ZTF (C/2022 E3). In the balmy -11 deg. temperature and with unusually clear skies (considering the recent weather) Brian managed to locate the comet in his binoculars and then attempt to get a photograph. He struggled with frozen fingers to set up the camera and get it pointed at the right spot in the sky but had difficulty getting a sharp focus as it had to be done manually and the cold  just made everything too hard to get right. After 45 minutes of fiddling about Brian decided to be satisfied with what he had and pack it in. It was worth all the suffering though as after the comet passes out of visibility in a few weeks it will not be seen again in quite a long time, if it ever does come back. Brian will try for better images whenever the sky clears again if it ever does before the comet leaves our neighborhood. Seeing a celestial visitor that will be seen by people only once, and so briefly, is a joy and a privilege even if it means risking frostbite and losing a bit of sleep. Learn all about this comet (dirty snowball!) at the link below:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C/2022_E3_(ZTF)

 

 

 

Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

 

 

 

 

 

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH. JAN. 21, 2023. BRIAN STONE

BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE. JAN. 21, 2023. BRIAN STONE

IRISHTOWN NATURE PARK. JAN. 21, 2023. BRIAN STONE

IRISHTOWN NATURE PARK. JAN. 21, 2023. BRIAN STONE

IRISHTOWN NATURE PARK. JAN. 21, 2023. BRIAN STONE

IRISHTOWN NATURE PARK. JAN. 21, 2023. BRIAN STONE

IRISHTOWN NATURE PARK. JAN. 21, 2023. BRIAN STONE

ROLLING SNOWBALLS. JAN. 21, 2023. BRIAN STONE

COMET ZTF (C 2022 E3). JAN. 22, 2023. BRIAN STONE

COMET ZTF (C 2022 E3). JAN. 22, 2023. BRIAN STONE