Friday, 18 September 2020

Sept 18, 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, September 18, 2020 (Friday)

 

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

** John Inman at 225 Mary’s Point Road in Harvey, Albert Co. has had a WHITE-WINGED DOVE arrive to his yard and has been there a few days now. John got a nice photo despite the wind and an equally interested Sharp-shined Hawk. This species is a long way from its native home of the very southern US, Mexico, and farther south. It is an uncommon visitor to NB.

 

** Roger Leblanc did some checking around his Notre Dame property for mushrooms.  Up to recently, it was very slim picking.  On Wednesday, he did a walkabout and things, although not even close to what they’ve been in the past, were somewhat more encouraging.  No CHANTERELLES to talk about, but he did find one LOBSTER MUSHROOM that he collected for the table.  He sends photos of a couple of mushrooms he noted.  He noted some suspected boletes in good numbers.  He photographed the FLY AGARIC, which is not an edible, due to its unpredictable and sometimes unpleasant hallucinogenic properties.  They can be common on lawn and cultivated areas, so take care with pets and children that could ingest them. They are not at all lethal but results of ingestion could cause alarm. They come in red as well as yellow and have the look of a candy-apple with dandruff!  Also, Roger includes the BIRCH POLYPORE which is non-toxic, but would be the eating texture of shoe leather.  One group looks like HONEY MUSHROOMS which are a favourite edible of many folk, and also the GEM-STUDDED PUFFBALL, which is edible but very bland, sort of like marshmallows without the sugar.  When getting to know an edible for the first time, a spore print would be very helpful if a gilled mushroom.   We only have a few deadly mushrooms, but the fact that they’re out there dictates, “if in doubt, throw it out.”

 

** Aldo Dorio photographed a group of SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS at the Neguac wharf on Thursday joined by one Sanderling.  We will not be seeing Semipalmated Sandpipers much longer.

 

** It’s Friday and time to review the next week’s Sky-at-a-Glace, courtesy of sky-guru Curt Nason.  

 

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, 2020 September 19 – September 26
Salamanders aren’t the most noticeable of critters; you usually have to make an effort to find one. This is a good time to locate the obscure constellation of Lacerta the Lizard, but it will take some effort and a dark sky.

Camouflaged partly by the Milky Way, Lacerta is surrounded by Cepheus, Cassiopeia, Pegasus and Cygnus. A good pointer to it is the base of the Summer Triangle. Running a line from bright Vega to Deneb at the tail of Cygnus and extending it about the same distance puts you near the zigzag shape of the lizard. It is one of those dim constellations created in the late 17th century by Johannes Hevelius to fill in an “empty” section of the sky. At first he named it Stellio; a stellion is a newt with star-like spots found near the Mediterranean Sea. If you manage to catch Lacerta, give yourself a pat on the back and let it go.

This Week in the Solar System    
Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 7:02 am and sunset will occur at 7:21 pm, giving 12 hours, 19 minutes of daylight (7:08 am and 7:26 pm in Saint John).  Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 7:11 am and set at 7:07 pm, giving 11 hours, 56 minutes of daylight (7:16 am and 7:13 pm in Saint John).  The Sun crosses the equator, migrating southward for winter, at 10:31 am on Tuesday. Autumn is in the air.

The Moon is at first quarter on Wednesday, then sliding below Jupiter and Saturn over the next two evenings. Telescope users might catch Jupiter’s stormy Red Spot around 9 pm Sunday and 10:30 pm on Tuesday. Mars rises around 8:30 pm, when Jupiter and Saturn are at their highest in the south. Mercury is very close to Spica on Tuesday, setting 40 minutes after the Sun, but the shallow angle of ecliptic makes them a difficult target in binoculars. Venus rises around 3:30 am, perhaps seen amid the zodiacal light between 5:30 and 6 if you have a clear dark sky.

With astronomy meetings and outreach activities on hold, you can watch the local Sunday Night Astronomy Show at 8 pm, and view archived shows, on YouTube at: 
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAEHfOWyL-kNH7dBVHK8spg

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.

 

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




 


WHITE-WINGED DOVE. SEPT 17, 2020. JOHN INMAN

SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER. SEPT 17, 2020.  ALDO DORIO

SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS JOINED BY ONE SANDERLING. SEPT 17, 2020.  ALDO DORIO

FLY AGARIC MUSHROOM. SEPT 17, 2020. ROGER LeBLANC

HONEY MUSHROOM. SEPT 17, 2020. ROGER LeBLANC

GEM-STUDDED PUFFBALL MUSHROOM. SEPT 17, 2020. ROGER LeBLANC

BIRCH POLYPORE. SEPT 17, 2020. ROGER LeBLANC

Lacerta

 



Thursday, 17 September 2020

Sept 17 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, September 17, 2020 (Thursday)  

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 

** Louise Nichols is again getting more mammals to her trail camera. The most recent one appears to be a WEASEL [Belette]. The tail seems long for the more common Short-tailed Weasel so if weasel is correct it is probably the less common, in this area, Long-tailed Weasel. A Marten cannot be ruled out but size suggests Weasel and Martens are usually in trees and are much less commonly seen in this area. Brian Stone took a few still screenshots out of the video to see it in still view. The video can be seen at the link below.

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/7uil9ikg8ubw0fz/SHORT-TAILED%20WEASEL.%20SEPT.%2013%2C%202020.%20LOUISE%20NICHOLS.AVI?dl=0

 

Louise joined Todd Watts at the Hawk Watch site at Greenlaw Mountain near Saint Andrews on Tuesday. There was a significant flight of BROAD-WINGED HAWKS [Petite Buse] but no photos as the birds were very high or far away and as Louise comments that as a volunteer she was to concentrate on counting.

 

**Yvette Richard caught some striking photos of the sun as it rose in the east and set in the west from her Cocagne home on Wednesday which she felt seemed a bit smoky.

 

**Marguerite Winsor was attracted to the same scenario from her Salisbury home this morning, Thursday morning to again get a striking photo.

 

** Brian Stone checked out the milkweed patches on the Gorge Rd. ramp area at the Trans-Canada Highway on Wednesday afternoon. There was not too much action there now, but a nice CICADA [Cigale] exuvia was found on the underside of a milkweed leaf. Also a BEAVER [Castor] family has established a dam across Hall’s Creek at the Gorge Rd. No beaver made a showing but they surely have been working the night shift.

 Brian took note of the fall fruiting body of the YELLOW POND LILY (Nuphar variegata) recently. It is probably something we don’t often take note of but are quite striking. Brian got a distant photo of the lily patch in a pond at the Wilson/Bell Marsh and a close up of the red, fall fruiting bodies.

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




 


WEASEL. (SUSPECTED) SEPT. 13, 2020.  LOUISE NICHOLS

WEASEL. (SUSPECTED) SEPT. 13, 2020.  LOUISE NICHOLS

SUNSET IN COCAGNE. SEPT 16, 2020. YVETTE RICHARD

SUNRISE IN COCAGNE. SEPT 16, 2020. YVETTE RICHARD

SUNRISE IN SALISBURY. SEPT 17, 2020. MARGUERITE WINSOR

CICADA EXUVIA. SEPT. 16, 2020. BRIAN STONE

CICADA EXUVIA. SEPT. 16, 2020. BRIAN STONE

YELLOW POND-LILY GROUP ( Nuphar variegata) . SEPT. 11, 2020,  BRIAN STONE

YELLOW POND-LILY LEAF( Nuphar variegata) . SEPT. 11, 2020,  BRIAN STONE

YELLOW POND-LILY FRUITING STRUCTURE ( Nuphar variegata) . SEPT. 11, 2020,  BRIAN STONE 

YELLOW POND-LILY FRUITING STRUCTURE ( Nuphar variegata) . SEPT. 11, 2020,  BRIAN STONE 

BEAVER DAM. SEPT. 16, 2020.  BRIAN STONE

BEAVER DAM. SEPT. 16, 2020.  BRIAN STONE

BEAVER DAM. SEPT. 16, 2020.  BRIAN STONE

 


Wednesday, 16 September 2020

Sept 16 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, September 16, 2020 (Wednesday)  

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 

** Aldo Dorio photographed a BALD-FACED HORNET on the eave of his Neguac home on Tuesday. This species is actually a Yellowjacket Wasp (Vespidae), not a true hornet. They build a pendulous, basketball sized nest that we’ll see very readily once the leaves start to fall. They are an aggressive wasp around their nests. Aldo also got another fresh looking MOURNING CLOAK BUTTERFLY [Papillon de la cape de deuil] that will be apt to overwinter as an adult just as the photo shows. The underside is very cryptic as camouflage against tree bark for the winter.

 

** Brian Stone got up early on Tuesday to put his garbage out for collection at 6:20 am and noticed the 4% waning CRESCENT MOON not too far away from the planet VENUS and decided it needed to be shot so sleepyheads could see what they missed. That having woken him up nicely he decided to go out and look for more subjects to record in the Cap Pele area for a few hours. At the Cap Pele and Cap Brule lagoons were lots of BONAPARTE'S GULLS [Mouette de Bonaparte] and CANADA GEESE [Bernaches du Canada] with a large population of DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS [Cormoran à aigrettes], especially at Cap Brule. A few shorebirds were evident at several areas and a LESSER YELLOWLEGS [Petit Chevalier] stopped feeding long enough for a portrait. A few scattered HORSE MUSHROOMS were up in spots and a spore print showed a dark, rich brown colour. On his way home he stopped at Pointe-du-Chéne for a quick shot of the immature LITTLE BLUE HERON [Aigrette bleue] that is still hanging out there. Back at home and later in the early evening he recorded the sunset through the hazy sky.

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




LITTLE BLUE HERON. SEPT. 15, 2020. BRIAN STONE

LITTLE BLUE HERON. SEPT. 15, 2020. BRIAN STONE

BONAPARTE'S GULL. SEPT. 15, 2020.. BRIAN STONE

BONAPARTE'S GULLS. SEPT. 15, 2020.. BRIAN STONE

DOUBLE CRESTED CORMORANTS. SEPT. 15, 2020. BRIAN STONE

LESSER YELLOWLEGS. SEPT. 15, 2020. BRIAN STONE

BALD-FACED HORNET. SEPT 15, 2020. ALDO DORIO

HORSE MUSHROOM. SEPT. 15, 2020.. BRIAN STONE

HORSE MUSHROOM (UNDERSIDE PINK GILLS WHEN FRESH). SEPT. 15, 2020. BRIAN STONE

HORSE MUSHROOM SPORE PRINT. SEPT. 15, 2020. BRIAN STONE

MOON AND VENUS. SEPT. 15, 2020. BRIAN STONE

SUNSET. SEPT. 15, 2020. BRIAN STONE

 

MOURNING CLOAK BUTTERFLY. SEPT 15, 2020. ALDO DORIO

Tuesday, 15 September 2020

Sept 15 2020



NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE,  September 15, 2020 (Tuesday)

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: david.cannon@rogers.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 

** Gordon Rattray made a trip to Gray Brook Marsh on Monday and found it teeming with birds. The duck population was 200+, with the majority MALLARD [Canard colvert] and BLACK [Canard noir] DUCKS but with several others mixed in. He set up his camera at the top end, where many mud flats were exposed and got some great photos of various ducks and shorebirds that are attached. A BELTED KINGFISHER [Martin-pêcheur d'Amérique] was present and a GREAT BLUE HERON [Grand Héron] dropped by as he was putting his camera in the car.

 

** Louise Nichols got a nature interaction on her trail camera in a wooded area near their Aulac home with four short video clips. It shows a SNOWSHOE HARE [Lièvre d’Amérique] being watched by some glowing eyes that turns out to be a BOBCAT [Lynx roux]. In one frame, if the sound is turned up, Snowshoe Hare vocalizing can be heard, to suggest it either got a major scare or became Bobcat prey. Take a look at the action at the links below.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/5f5ge8pizfalepc/Louise%20Nickols%20-%20Hare%20and%20Bobcat%2001.AVI?dl=0

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/sok0xf5xhjfea24/Louise%20Nickols%20-%20Hare%20and%20Bobcat%2002.AVI?dl=0

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/b4mcinzb9zyxoej/Louise%20Nickols%20-%20Hare%20and%20Bobcat%2003.AVI?dl=0

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/eru0y90bwjw79ys/Louise%20Nickols%20-%20Hare%20and%20Bobcat%2004.AVI?dl=0

 

** Stella LeBlanc got some nice photos of a juvenile EASTERN PHOEBE [Moucherolle phébi] in their Bouctouche yard. You can still see pin feathers around the head area, some fluffy white natal down feathers, and a quite-yellow breast area that suggest a young-of-the-year bird. This must have been from a second or possibly a third nesting of the season as the Eastern Phoebe is one of our first FLYCATCHERS to arrive in the spring and get an early start.


**Georges Brun is almost certain that the attached photo is a Black-Crowned Night Heron.  It was low in the Petitcodiac River just on the backside of Chateau Moncton on Monday.  He tried everything in the book to get a good image but too dark and river conditions not adequate for time of day! The bird was probably on its migratory route south from the nesting colony near Lameque. It is a great time to watch for this species passing through.


**Brian Stone found a small mushroom growing in one of their potted plants Tuesday morning. It came up fast, just in the last two days. It's just 3.5 cm. today. It appears to be the WOOLY-STALKED COPRINUS (Coprinus lagopus) and got nice attached photos.

 

** Several of us visited a burn-over Mike Plourde had first alerted us to, on the South Cains River Road near Blackville, to get an audience with the numerous BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKERS [Pic à dos noir] that had assembled there. Pam Watters and Phil Riebel visited on September 11th and noted a particular mushroom growing there that was new to most of us. The rest of us that visited the site obviously spent too much time looking up and did not notice this mushroom growing quite prolifically. Pam Watters found one that matched it in her mushroom guide and it is now agreed that she was spot on and it was CRUSTLIKE CUP (Rhizina Undulada) [Rhizine ondulée]. There seems to be few if any reports of this in New Brunswick, but probably it has been present in the burn-over areas it prefers, and has been over-looked. Phil got some excellent photos from different angles and are attached today. Specimens are being saved as the New Brunswick Museum reports it has no collections of this species in its herbarium. The guide suggests this mushroom species grows the year after a burn-over. These specimens did not read that guide as this burn took place in June of 2020.

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




 

EASTERN PHOEBE (JUVENILE). SEPT 14, 2020. .STELLA LEBLANC

BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT HERON. SEPT 14, 2020. GEORGES BRUN

BLUE-WINGED TEAL. SEPT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

LESSER YELLOWLEGS. SEPT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

GREEN-WINGED TEAL. SEPT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

KILLDEER. SEPT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

LEAST SANDPIPER. SEPT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

LESSER YELLOWLEGS. SEPT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

MALLARD DUCK. SEPT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

NORTHERN PINTAIL (MALE IN MOLT). SEPT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

SANDERLING. SEPT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

SEMIPALMATED PLOVERS. SEPT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER. SEPT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY


CRUSTLIKE CUP MUSHROOM (RHIZINA UNDULATA). SEPT 11, 2020.  PHIL RIEBEL 

CRUSTLIKE CUP MUSHROOM (RHIZINA UNDULATA). SEPT 11, 2020.  PHIL RIEBEL 

CRUSTLIKE CUP MUSHROOM (RHIZINA UNDULATA). SEPT 11, 2020.  PHIL RIEBEL 

CRUSTLIKE CUP MUSHROOM (RHIZINA UNDULATA). SEPT 11, 2020.  PHIL RIEBEL 

CRUSTLIKE CUP MUSHROOM (RHIZINA UNDULATA). SEPT 11, 2020.  PHIL RIEBEL 

CRUSTLIKE CUP MUSHROOM (RHIZINA UNDULATA). SEPT 11, 2020.  PHIL RIEBEL 

CRUSTLIKE CUP MUSHROOM (RHIZINA UNDULATA). SEPT 11, 2020.  PHIL RIEBEL 

 

WOOLLY-STALKED COPRINUS MUSHROOM. SEPT 15, 2020. BRIAN STONE

WOOLLY-STALKED COPRINUS MUSHROOM. SEPT 15, 2020. BRIAN STONE