Monday, 10 December 2018

Dec 10 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE,  December 10, 2018 (Monday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca/

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com.

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at http://www.naturemoncton.com.

Editor: Nelson Poirier   nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: David Christie  maryspt@mac.com>
Info Line telephone #  506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

** A full report on the line-up for Tuesday night’s December meeting of Nature Moncton is repeated at the end of this message. Don’t forget to collect bird feeder information, photos, etc. for the second half of the meeting.



** Doreen Rossiter reports she encountered something that she had never seen before in all her years of feeding birds. An AMERICAN ROBIN [Merle d’Amérique] was eating seeds from a feeder in the –16°C dawn cold. She promptly put out apples.

A male RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER [Pic à ventre roux] re-appeared after a two-week no-show to her Alma feeder yard. My male Red-bellied Woodpecker that had been quite faithful has not been seen for several days, however, was replaced by a NORTHERN FLICKER [Pic flamboyant].

** Stella and Jean-Paul LeBlanc noticed a MALLARD-BLACK DUCK hybrid [Canard colvert x Canard noir] among the hundreds of Mallards near the Bouctouche lagoon. They have seen little of that hybrid that is so often seen with the Mapleton Park troop of Mallards. The Mallard-Black Duck cross is not sterile, as some hybrids are, and is able to reproduce. They also saw a NORTHERN PINTAIL [Canard pilet] at the Bouctouche lagoon on Sunday.

They also comment that a new visitor has appeared in their Bouctouche feeder yard, a GRAY SQUIRREL [Écureuil gris] that has become a big competitor for the black oil sunflower seed. It was a similar scenario at our own Moncton feeder yard, with only one or two appearing in winter, the past 12 years. This year seemed to produce an explosion of them, with up to 8 at the feeders and putting the run to the birds. Some ecological re-location had to take place, which seems to have levelled out the playing field.


* The Nature Moncton meeting is coming up tomorrow, Tuesday evening, Dec. 11, at 7 p.m. at the Mapleton Rotary Lodge, across from the former Cabela’s.  A few folks do head south for the winter, but all of us will get a chance to go even farther, for a trip to visit Cape Town, South Africa on Tuesday night. New Nature Moncton member, Uli Irlich, who worked with the municipality of Cape Town for six years and is an avid naturalist will tell folks about the region that has been labeled the “most diverse urban area in the world”, being custodian to 3300 plants, 365 bird species, and 83 mammal species, that really could outdo good old New Brunswick! Don’t miss this spectacular show in a warm room, with the cold outside. The write-up is attached:
Nature Moncton December Meeting
“Cape Town: Its Unique Biodiversity and the Work the Municipality Does to Protect it”
Date: December 11th, 2018
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Mapleton Park Rotary Lodge
Speaker: Ulrike Irlich

Cape Town (South Africa) is located within the Cape Floristic Region, one of six floral kingdoms on the planet.  Cape Town is a global biodiversity hot spot and has been labeled as the “most biodiverse urban area in the world.”  Cape Town is the proud custodian of over 3300 plant species, 365 bird species and 83 mammal species, and much more.  On top of this, the city boasts high levels of endemism.
This presentation will showcase the unique biodiversity found within the city and highlights some of the work the municipality does to protect its natural heritage.  Uli worked for the municipality for 6 years and will talk about Cape Town’s biodiversity and some of the special adaptations and conservation projects around the city.

The second half of the meeting theme is bird feeding, to be filled with photos, bird lists, different types of feeders, or anything bird-related, with a “show and tell” table. This will all be done with members’ contributions, so get ready now to bring in anything you have to get and give ideas to keep our yard visitors happy and coming. This part of the notice will be repeated on Monday’s and Tuesday’s editions.




Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton

 
GREY SQUIRREL. DEC 6, 2018. JP LEBLANC

MALLARD X BLACK DUCK (HYBRID) DEC 9 2018. STELLA LEBLANC

Sunday, 9 December 2018

Dec 9 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 9, 2018 (Sunday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to <http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca>

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>

Please advise the editor if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 

Editor: Nelson Poirier   <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>
Transcript by: David Christie   
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** The Nature Moncton meeting is coming up on Tuesday evening, Dec. 11, at 7 p.m. at the Mapleton Rotary Lodge, across from the former Cabela’s.  A few folks do head south for the winter, but all of us will get a chance to go even farther, for a trip to visit Cape Town, South Africa on Tuesday night. New Nature Moncton member, Uli Irlich, who worked with the municipality of Cape Town for six years and is an avid naturalist will tell folks about the region that has been labeled the “most diverse urban area in the world”, being custodian to 3300 plants, 365 bird species, and 83 mammal species, that really could outdo good old New Brunswick! Don’t miss this spectacular show in a warm room, with the cold outside. The write-up is attached:
Nature Moncton December Meeting
“Cape Town: Its Unique Biodiversity and the Work the Municipality Does to Protect it”
Date: December 11th, 2018
Time: 7:00 pm
Location: Mapleton Park Rotary Lodge
Speaker: Ulrike Irlich

Cape Town (South Africa) is located within the Cape Floristic Region, one of six floral kingdoms on the planet.  Cape Town is a global biodiversity hot spot and has been labeled as the “most biodiverse urban area in the world.”  Cape Town is the proud custodian of over 3300 plant species, 365 bird species and 83 mammal species, and much more.  On top of this, the city boasts high levels of endemism.
This presentation will showcase the unique biodiversity found within the city and highlights some of the work the municipality does to protect its natural heritage.  Uli worked for the municipality for 6 years and will talk about Cape Town’s biodiversity and some of the special adaptations and conservation projects around the city.

The second half of the meeting theme is bird feeding, to be filled with photos, bird lists, different types of feeders, or anything bird-related, with a “show and tell” table. This will all be done with members’ contributions, so get ready now to bring in anything you have to get and give ideas to keep our yard visitors happy and coming. This part of the notice will be repeated on Monday’s and Tuesday’s editions.

** Doreen Rossiter leaves an update on activity at her Alma feeder yard. She comments that there has been much less activity the past week, with AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune], PURPLE FINCH [Roselin pourpré] and PINE SISKIN [Tarin des pins] all seeming to have left. Unlike last winter, she has many HAIRY [Pic chevelu] and DOWNY WOODPECKERS [Pic mineur]; BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES [Mésange à tête noire], BLUE JAYS [Geai bleu], RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES [Sittelle à poitrine rousse] and DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoisé]. There are still a number of SONG SPARROWS [Bruant chanteur], WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS [Bruant à gorge blanche], and at least 2 or 3 FOX SPARROWS [Bruant fauve]. The female NORTHERN CARDINAL [Cardinal rouge] is still a regular and one lone male EVENING GROSBEAK [Gros-bec errant] is still visiting.

** Larry Sherrard’s trail camera photographed a young male WHITE-TAILED DEER [Cerf de Virginie], with its junior set of antlers still intact only a hundred yards from his Lower Coverdale home on Friday morning.

** The Riverview Marsh seems like an active site for mammals and birds. Georges Brun got a distant photo of a RED FOX [Renard roux] possibly checking out the offering tossed to the ground below a hawk-perching site. Georges also tallied 44 CANADA GEESE [Bernache du Canada] with some MALLARDS [Canard colvert] among the ice floes in the Petitcodiac River, as the tidal bore was advancing, as well as a flock of Canada Geese moving down river.

** Not as much chatter about EVENING GROSBEAKS [Gros-bec errant] the past week but Jane LeBlanc photographed a striking male that dropped into her St. Martins feeder yard, right after her first COMMON REDPOLL [Sizerin flammé] of the season on Saturday.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton

 
EVENING GROSBEAK (MALE). DEC 8 2018. JANE LeBLANC
CANADA GEESE (44)+ MALLARDS DEC 7 2018 GEORGES BRUN

CANADA GEESE DEC 7 2018 GEORGES BRUN 

MORSELS BELOW ROOSTING HAWK SITE, RIVERVIEW MARSH. DEC 06, 2018 .GEORGES BRUN

RED FOX. DEC 06 2018. GEORGES BRUN

WHITE-TAILED DEER. DEC 8, 2018. LARRY SHERRARD


Saturday, 8 December 2018

Dec 8 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, 8 December 2018 (Saturday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the info line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com


Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

Jane LeBlanc had a visit from a lone COMMON REDPOLL to her
St. Martin’s feeder yard on Saturday morning to get a nice photo to show its distinct
raspberry coloured beret and sharply forked tail. It was in company with
many BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADDES and RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES.
We should be expecting more redpolls to be dropping by feeder yards
as the Birch catkin crop diminishes.

**The cold nights can lead to some very unique designs from Jack Frost. Shawn Cormier captured a beautiful such design on his home window on Friday morning. Shawn’s photo rather parallels a branch complete with midrib and slim leaves.

**The Nature Moncton activities committee met on Friday afternoon to make plans for upcoming meetings, presentations, field trips, workshops, and projects. Lots of ideas from the committee and members’ suggestions were discussed, and tentative plans made. Much of these plans, once in place, will be on the website (with its new webmaster) over the next month.

**The December meeting is coming up next Tuesday night, December 11th, with more on the main presentation on Sunday, Monday, and Tuesday’s editions. It was decided to continue the idea of themes for the second half of the meeting. The theme for the second half of this coming Tuesday’s meeting will be bird feeders, and what members are getting to their feeder yards. Bring along photos, lists of birds you’re getting and what the favourite food is, feeder ideas, or anything else dealing with bird feeding. Don’t forget items for the “show and tell table” to demonstrate feeders you have built or ones that you have purchased and like. Favourite food items should be on the agenda as well.

**It’s also time to be thinking of the January meeting, which is members’ night, which will be 10-20 minute presentations by members on any subject that they choose on any nature experience. It’s time to be getting that ready now for presentation in January. The whole meeting in January will be devoted to members’ presentations, so there will be no theme for the second half. However, the theme for the second half of the meeting in February will be tracks, scat, and sign, so start getting photos and samples now. Scat samples should be handled with plastic gloves or an inverted plastic grocery bag. For tracks and trails make sure to measure the stride, that is to say the distance from the front of one track to the front of the next.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton


COMMON REDPOLL. DEC 8, 2018. JANE LeBLANC

FROST NOV 07,2018 .SHAWN CORMIER

Friday, 7 December 2018

Dec 7 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 7, 2018 (Friday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

Please advise editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at
www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com.

** Clarence Cormier is has been having a SHORT-TAILED WEASEL [Belette à courte queue] in its now snow-white winter pelage with black tail tip checking out  his bird feeder yard in Grande-Digue.  In true Weasel fashion, it seldom stays long enough for a photo, but Clarence did get a documentary photo.

** The New Brunswick Winter Bird List being kept by Gilles Belliveau now has reached 126.  Check it out at http://nbwinter.gbnature.com
 to see if you might be able to add any not yet recorded bird species.

** Nature Moncton Christmas Bird Count co-ordinator Roger Leblanc reminds folks that the important count is near at hand.  The official Moncton count day is Saturday Dec. 15th, but count period for Moncton runs from Dec. 14th to Dec. 18th, so it is important to record any birds not seen on count day but in count week to report them to be included.  It is also important for folks who would like to participate by keeping counts at their feeder yards to report what they’ve tallied as well.  The instructions for that are included in the Nature Moncton email mail-out.


** This week’s Sky-at-a-Glance is included in this edition, courtesy of sky-guru Curt Nason.  It’s finally looking like we’ll have some evenings ahead to enjoy lots of the night sky objects without cloud cover and before bedtime.

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, December 8 – December 15
The excitement in the sky this week is twofold: a comet and comet (or asteroid) remnants. Comet 46P/Wirtanen has been in the news the past month as a possible naked eye sight in mid-December, with cautionary notes from experienced observers that it might appear large and therefore have a low surface brightness. Under such conditions, light pollution could mask it entirely. I saw Wirtanen from Saints Rest Beach, outside the Irving Nature Park in Saint John, on Wednesday evening. My initial view was with 15x63 binoculars and my first impression was that I could see hints of its green glow that appear in pictures. A trick we use to enhance star colours is to de-focus a telescope or binoculars so that the light falls on a larger number of cone cells in our eye. With the comet’s coma being nearly the apparent size of the Moon, perhaps that was the reason for that impression. Before observing it in my 8-inch telescope I saw it in the 8x50 finder, and I had occasional glimpses naked eye using averted vision (looking off to the side of it to take advantage of the more sensitive rod cells that circle our day-vision cone cells).

Over this week Comet Wirtanen passes rapidly east of the head of Cetus the Whale and into Taurus. Next weekend, when it is closest to Earth at a distance of about 11 million kilometres, it passes between the V-shaped Hyades star cluster and the compact dipper-shaped Pleiades star cluster. It is expected to brighten and look larger than the Moon over that time, which could reduce the surface brightness. Comet maps can be obtained from the Skyhound and Heavens-Above websites, but the most practical one for Wirtanen this week was produced by Bob King for the Sky and Telescope website.

The other highlight this week is the peak of the Geminid meteor shower, which occurs around 9 am Friday, December 14. Thursday night, Friday morning and Friday night are prime time hours. The Moon sets around 10:30 pm Thursday and an hour later on Friday. Find a location away from streetlights, get comfortable in a reclining chair, dress for warmth and use a blanket, and look up toward your clearest and darkest patch of sky. The Geminids progenitor is asteroid 3200 Phaethon, which is likely a dead comet.

This Week in the Solar System
Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 7:48 am and sunset will occur at 4:33 pm, giving 8 hours, 45 minutes of daylight (7:50 am and 4:41 pm in Saint John). Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 7:54 am and set at 4:34 pm, giving 8 hours, 40 minutes of daylight (7:56 am and 4:42 pm in Saint John).

The Moon is a slender crescent this weekend after sunset and is at first quarter next Saturday. Planetary action has shifted to the morning sky with Venus blazing brilliantly and Mercury climbing to its greatest elongation next weekend, rising nearly two hours before the Sun. Jupiter is less than a fist-width lower left of Mercury and closing in. Saturn is too low in the west at sunset for observing, and Mars getting too small to reveal much detail in a telescope.

The William Brydone Jack Astronomy Club meets in the UNB Fredericton Forestry / Earth Sciences building on Tuesday, December 11 at 7 pm. All are welcome.

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.

Attached: Comet Wirtanen map by Bob King (skyandtelescope.com)




Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
46PWirtanen skyandtelescope

WEASEL. DEC 4, 2018. CLARENCE CORMIER

Thursday, 6 December 2018

Dec 6 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 06, 2018 (Thursday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**John Massey lives in Dieppe, but in a spot where there is a wooded area around him before getting to the next housing area. It has become very surprising the number of WHITE-TAILED DEER [Cerf de Virginie] that have that area as a territory. John comments that he now has a full complement of Santa’s deer that includes three bucks, four young of the year, and at least seven others to make up a herd of at least fourteen. From John’s photos they look to be healthy and happy. The bucks will be losing their antlers over the next month.

A short report on my own feeder area. The AMERICAN GOLDFINCH and PINE SISKIN combo have rocketed to 60+ but sparrows have declined to a few WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS, several AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS, and one SONG SPARROW. A NORTHERN FLICKER is regular but RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER and NORTHERN CARDINALS have not been seen in a few days. Several HOUSE FINCHES are daily patrons as well as other expected regulars. The waterer is VERY popular. 

Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton

 
WHITE-TAILED DEER. DEC 5, 2018 .JOHN MASSEY

WHITE-TAILED DEER. DEC 5, 2018 .JOHN MASSEY

Wednesday, 5 December 2018

Dec 5 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 5, 2018 ( Wednesday)
To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca'
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.comPlease advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com.
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com.
Transcript by: Judy Marsh    marshj@nbnet.nb.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397"(384-NEWS)

** Carmella Melanson comments that she does not tend to see that many NORTHERN SHRIKE [Pie-grièche grise], but saw two different  individuals on Tuesday to get some great photos. She saw one in Hillsborough and one on the Cape Enrage Road. It is looking like a great season for our northern winter visitors so far, including the Northern Shrike.
** SNOWY OWL [Harfang des neiges] reports would seem a bit sparce so far, but that can change quickly.
** Aldo Doiro photographed a CHIPPING SPARROW [Bruant familier] around the Neguac wharf on Tuesday. This one does not seem as deeply into winter plumage as some of the other photos that have been submitted, but the paler bill is obvious as well as that dark bar going through the eye right to the bill which is a signature identification feature for a Chipping Sparrow. It seems to have retained its reddish crown of summer longer than most Both COMMON MERGANSER [Grand Harle] and RED-BREASTED MERGANSER [Harle huppé] are  around the wharf area as well. 
Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton


 
CHIPPING SPARROW. DEC  4, 2018. ALDO DORIO

NORTHERN SHRIKE Dec 4th 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

NORTHERN SHRIKE flight Dec 4th 2018 CARMELLA MELANSON

RED-BREASTED MERGANSER. (MALE) DEC  4, 2018. ALDO DORIO

Tuesday, 4 December 2018

Dec 4 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 04, 2018 (Tuesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**Jean-Paul and Stella Leblanc got an excellent photo of an adult, male LONG-TAILED DUCK [Harelde kakawi] at Cap Lumiére on Monday. This duck species will spend the winter with us. They also spotted a NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD [Moqueur polyglotte] from the Cormierville wharf on Monday. We now know of at least three in the area. Jean-Paul also photographed a BALD EAGLE [Pygargue à tête blanche] on the side of the road near the fish market in Cocagne that was keeping an eye on the duck activity there. Jean-Paul also advises that Maria Gauvin has a pair of NORTHERN CARDINALS [Cardinal rouge] in her feeder yard in Saint-Anne-de-Kent. It is nice to hear of this species staying in the area with several feeder yards hosting them. Some are visiting on and off while others are regulars.

** Georges Brun got a documentary photo of a light phase ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK [Buse pattue] on the Riverview Marsh on Monday. He has been seeing it using the same perch for some time but was unable to get more than a documentary photo. This means that two ROUGH-LEGGED HAWKS [Buse pattue], one RED-TAILED HAWK [Buse à queue rousse] and NORTHERN HARRIERS [Busard des marais] have been spotted by Georges on this marsh recently. There must be a Vole population there. Are Short-eared Owls next on the list as they were last year?

** Brian Stone got a photo of a mass of SLUG EGGS under a rock near a home foundation on Monday. Red-backed Salamander egg masses can look very similar but one can usually easily see the developing embryos more clearly in the case of the Red-backed Salamander egg mass.

** Each tree and shrub has its own unique winter bud, leaf scar, and arrangements which I personally find interesting and challenging to identify without telltale leaves/needles, flowers, or fruit/cones. I like to share a species from time to time and maybe someone might also get interested. Today I am attaching three photos of the HIGHBUSH CRANBERRY shrub to show its alternate arrangement of reddish, elongated, lateral buds with twin terminal buds and a few of the cleat shaped leaf scars below each bud which contain three leaf vein scars. The arrangement of the parts of this species is opposite while other tree/shrub species would be alternate to further help in narrowing identity.  

Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton


 
BALD EAGLE. DEC 2,2018..JP LEBLANC

ROUGH-LEGGED HAWK (LIGHT MORPH) DEC 3 2018 GEORGES BRUN

HIGHBUSH CRANBERRY LATERAL BUD AND LEAF SCAR. DEC 3, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

HIGHBUSH CRANBERRY LATERAL BUDS. DEC 3, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

HIGHBUSH CRANBERRY TERMINAL BUDS. DEC 3, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

LONG-TAILED DUCK (ADULT MALE). DEC 3,2018. JP LEBLANC

NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD. DEC 2, 2018. JP LEBLANC

SLUG EGGS. DEC. 03, 2018. BRIAN STONE