Tuesday, 18 May 2021

May 18 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 18, 2021 (Tuesday)

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by Susan Richards susan_richards@rogers.com

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

**It is Nature Moncton meeting tonight at 7 o’clock with a virtual presentation of the state of Bats in New Brunswick and Bat housing.  The link to join in is attached:

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87261352355?pwd=d0ZIMUdoeXpvZ2QxdGV1N3VkbnJOUT09

  The write-up is attached below as well so set your phone alarms for 6:50 p.m. tonight so as not to forget as it is so easy to do with Zoom presentation.

Nature Moncton May Meeting

May 18, 2021 at 7:00 PM

Virtual Meeting

Presenter: Karen Vanderwolf

“Bats -- Their Present Status in New Brunswick and Man-Made Suggested Housing”

The relatively sudden appearance of the fungal disease White-nose Syndrome in New Brunswick came close to decimating our cave bats.

It was first discovered here in March 2011. Karen Vanderwolf was very instrumental with Dr. Don McAlpine in documenting the dramatic decrease of bats in the cave hibernating that population. However, Karen did field work for her PhD during the summer of 2019 in New Brunswick and found that bats are persisting and reproducing despite being exposed to White-nose Syndrome for many years. Karen has conducted a lot of research in caves and mines and has studied other aspects of cave biology.

Karen’s interest in bats has continued and she is currently finishing her PhD on bats at Trent University in Ontario.

Karen has become involved with the Canadian Wildlife Federation in projects to study bats and bat housing. She will give us information on the present status of bats in New Brunswick and suggestions on man-made housing to assist bats.

This presentation will be virtual and the link for anyone anywhere to join in will be

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87261352355?pwd=d0ZIMUdoeXpvZ2QxdGV1N3VkbnJOUT09

 

**John Inman at 225 Mary’s Point Road has had a great diversity of bird visitors over the past few weeks.  Unfortunately, computer challenges prevented John from sharing his great photos with us but lots got through for today, to include EASTERN KINGBIRD [Tyran tritri], BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER [Gobemoucheron gris-bleu], BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER [Paruline bleue], WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW [Bruant à couronne blanche], ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK [Cardinal à poitrine rose] and orioles galore. 

The oriole section in John’s photos include a female ORCHARD ORIOLE [Oriole des vergers] and other BALTIMORE ORIOLES [Oriole de Baltimore] in various stages of immature molt and one could even be a female.  Immature plumages of orioles can be tricky.  John is experiencing flocks of BLUE JAYS [Geai bleu] migrating  that others have been noting.  He sends a photo of a flock in flight which John comments was only about ¼ of what the whole flock really was.  On Monday morning he still had approximately 100 Blue Jays in his yard.  The feeders and containers have to be refueled about 3 times a day.


**Doreen Rossiter in Alma also had a visit from an ORCHARD ORIOLE on Monday.   She found a lookalike in Sibley guide as a first-year male but black patch on the throat was faint.  She suspected it visited her fruit offerings on Sunday as well but did not get good observation.  The last time that she has had an Orchard Oriole visit her yard was in May of 2013.

**Jim Carroll comments on Monday he learned a SPOTTED SANDPIPER [Chevalier grivelé] is a sandpiper that branch perches occasionally, which is something most of our sandpipers do not do.  Jim got a photo of one doing just that and looking glamorous while doing so at Belle Isle Marsh in Springfield.  What a beautiful open-wing photo Jim got that we usually do not get to see.


**Stella Leblanc’s great photo comparison of a WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW [Bruant à couronne blanche]   and  WHITE-THROATED SPARROW [Bruant à gorge blanche] together was accidently cut from the first sent out version of yesterday’s edition; sending again today for any that may have missed it.

 

** Brian Coyle was working in Salisbury Monday near the lagoon off Government Road. After work was done, he decided to walk around the pond and made several observations. He saw a pair of adult Bald Eagles who put the run to an Osprey and also took after some ducks.

Some of the birds Brian photographed on his short visit were  SPOTTED SANDPIPER, LEAST SANDPIPER, GRAY CATBIRD, NORTHERN PARULA WARBLER, RING-NECKED DUCKS, and NORTHERN SHOVELER DUCKS.

 

**Cynthia MacKenzie shares some observations from the weekend.  A WHITE-TAILED DEER in a beautifully changing coat stepped out, on Thursday.

  Cynthia drove past the fox den on Friday and watched the kits rough housing again.  They are amusing to watch safely from the car as always so as not to disturb or alarm them.  She was able to get a picture of 1 little one next to the mother to show how large that they are getting now. 

On the weekend they had a few large hawks flying over the back yard and they saw one dive into the densely treed area two separate times.  It appears to be a BROAD-WINGED HAWK [Petite Buse]

On Sunday they drove to Kouchibouquac and saw a large PORCUPINE [Porc-épic d'Amerique] very high up in a tree having its lunch along route 134.

Cynthia had her first hummingbird on Sunday, being a female, then captured a picture of her on Monday and was able to identify her resting spot in a tree.  She will be watching for a nest. 

Finally, she had a Garter Snake [couleuvre] visit her trying to enter her open garage door on Monday and hissed at her when she suggested it leave.  It was in no hurry to leave!


**Lots of CANADA GEESE [Bernache du Canada] with goslings at the moment. Pat Gibbs came across a family at the Centennial Park Trail on Monday.  Pat was a bit concerned at first about the cycle traffic, but geese and humans seem to be ok with sharing the right-of-way.


**Yvette Richard got a sharp looking specimen of a GRAY CATBIRD [Moqueur chat] at the Hillsborough train track on Monday.  Gray Catbirds are moving in quickly at the moment.


**Aldo Dorio came across a KILLDEER [Pluvier kildir] seemingly monitoring traffic on a paved road at Hay Island on Monday and in no particular rush to not stand its ground.  It is always amazing the open obvious places this species can create a nest if you would call it a nest.  It is more of a scrape so the eggs don’t roll out.


**Susan Richards sends a photo of keen participants at the Nature Moncton Warbler Field Trip on May 15th at the old Hillsborough rail line.


**Brian Stone photographed  fish moving about in water at Wilson Marsh recently.  Alyre Chaisson confirmed and gave some helpful comments as Banded Killifish [killifish en bandes].  Alyre comments they are more streamlined than the similar Mummichog, triangular head, dorsal fin a bit more forward, and the caudal fin squared off rather than rounded.

**I have been putting out a mesh bag of meat cutting sawdust balls on a tree outside of our camp supposedly for birds.  It disappeared at night so put a trail camera on it Monday night to find it was a Red Fox jumping up at the cache.  A photo shows the cache peacefully hanging, then the Red Fox jumps for it then stands proudly at the bottom with its prize for a moment.  A last photo shows it the morning after, to show that Barkley (eyes, nose, and mouth) watched the whole event and of course, saying little of what he saw!

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

 

BALTIMORE ORIOLE AND ORCHARD ORIOLE (FEMALE). MAY 16, 2021. JOHN INMAN

BALTIMORE ORIOLE AND ORCHARD ORIOLE (FEMALE). MAY 16, 2021. JOHN INMAN

ORCHARD ORIOLE (FEMALE). MAY 16, 2021. JOHN INMAN

BALTIMORE ORIOLE. MAY 16, 2021.  . JOHN INMAN

BALTIMORE ORIOLE. MAY 16, 2021.  . JOHN INMAN

BALTIMORE ORIOLE. MAY 16, 2021.  . JOHN INMAN

BALTIMORE ORIOLES. MAY 16, 2021.  . JOHN INMAN

SPOTTED SANDPIPER. MAY 17, 2021. JIM CARROLL

SPOTTED SANDPIPER. MAY17, 2021. BRIAN COYLE

LEAST SANDPIPER. MAY17, 2021. BRIAN COYLE



WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW AND WHITE THROATED SPARROW. MAY 15 2021. STELLA LEBLANC

WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW. MAY 15 2021. JOHN INMAN

BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER. MAY 15 2021. JOHN INMAN

BLUE-GRAY KNATCATCHER. MAY 5 2021. JOHN INMAN

AMERICAN WIGEON (MALE). MAY17, 2021. BRIAN COYLE

EASTERN KINGBIRD. MAY 17 2021. JOHN INMAN

BROAD-WINGED HAWK. MAY 17, 2021. CYNTHIA MacKENZIE

CANADA GOOSE FAMILY AT CENTENNIAL
 PARK. MAY 17, 2021. PAT GIBBS

BLUE JAY FLOCK. MAY 2021. JOHN INMAN

KILLDEER. MAY 17, 2021.  ALDO DORIO

KILLDEER. MAY 17, 2021.  ALDO DORIO

GRAY CATBIRD. MAY 17, 2021. YVETTE RICHARD

GRAY CATBIRD. MAY17, 2021. BRIAN COYLE

NASHVILLE WARBLER. MAY 17, 2021. CYNTHIA MacKENZIE

NORTHERN PARULA WARBLER. MAY17, 2021. BRIAN COYLE

NORTHERN SHOVELER (PAIR). MAY17, 2021. BRIAN COYLE

RING-NECKED DUCK (PAIR). MAY17, 2021. BRIAN COYLE

ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK (MALE). MAY 15 2021. JOHN INMAN

RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD (FEMALE). MAY 17, 2021.  CYNTHIA MacKENZIE

RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD (FEMALE). MAY 17, 2021.  CYNTHIA MacKENZIE



BALD EAGLE. MAY17, 2021. BRIAN COYLE


GARTER SNAKE. MAY 17, 2021. CYNTHIA MacKENZIE

RED FOX DEN. MAY 17, 2021. CYNTHIA MacKENZIE

PORCUPINE. MAY 17, 2021. CYNTHIA MacKENZIE

WHITE-TAILED DEER. MAY 17, 2021. CYNTHIA MacKENZIE



PARTICIPANTS ON NATURE MONCTON WARBLER FIELD TRIP. MAY 15, 2021. SUSAN RICHARDS

BANDED KILLIFISH.  MAY 15, 2021. BRIAN STONE

CACHE OF MEAT CUTTING SAWDUST. MAY 16, 2021, NELSON POIRIER

RED FOX JUMPING FOR CACHE OF MEAT CUTTING SAWDUST. MAY 16, 2021, NELSON POIRIER

RED FOX WITH PRIZE OF CACHE OF MEAT CUTTING SAWDUST. MAY 16, 2021, NELSON POIRIER

BARKLEY (ARROW) WHO WATCHED IT ALL. MAY 16, 2021, NELSON POIRIER



 

Monday, 17 May 2021

May 17 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 17, 2021 (Monday)

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by Susan Richards susan_richards@rogers.com

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

** I don’t how it crept up so suddenly after all the earlier planning, but Nature Moncton meeting night is happening tomorrow night, Tuesday, May 17 with a presentation on BAT HOUSING AND PRESENT NB BAT STATUS with Karen Vanderwolf. It will be a zoom presentation and the contact link to participate is:

 

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87261352355?pwd=d0ZIMUdoeXpvZ2QxdGV1N3VkbnJOUT09

A full write-up of the presentation is below:

Nature Moncton May Meeting

May 18, 2021 at 7:00 PM

Virtual Meeting

Presenter: Karen Vanderwolf

“Bats -- Their Present Status in New Brunswick and Man-Made Suggested Housing”

The relatively sudden appearance of the fungal disease White-nose Syndrome in New Brunswick came close to decimating our cave bats.

It was first discovered here in March 2011. Karen Vanderwolf was very instrumental with Dr. Don McAlpine in documenting the dramatic decrease of bats in the cave hibernating that population. However, Karen did field work for her PhD during the summer of 2019 in New Brunswick and found that bats are persisting and reproducing despite being exposed to White-nose Syndrome for many years. Karen has conducted a lot of research in caves and mines and has studied other aspects of cave biology.

Karen’s interest in bats has continued and she is currently finishing her PhD on bats at Trent University in Ontario.

Karen has become involved with the Canadian Wildlife Federation in projects to study bats and bat housing. She will give us information on the present status of bats in New Brunswick and suggestions on man-made housing to assist bats.

This presentation will be virtual and the link for anyone anywhere to join in will be

https://us02web.zoom.us/j/87261352355?pwd=d0ZIMUdoeXpvZ2QxdGV1N3VkbnJOUT09

 

 

**Stella Leblanc got a wonderful photo of a WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW [Bruant à couronne blanche] and WHITE-THROATED SPARROW [Bruant à gorge blanche] side by side at their Bouctouche feeder yard on Saturday.  Surely at the right place at the right time to see these 2 Sparrows together.  The White-Crowned Sparrows are making their short window of drop-by visits at feeder yards as they are on route to breed to the north of us.

 

**Andrew Darcy participated in the Nature Moncton Warbler outing on Saturday and had a fantastic morning! They actually logged 10 warbler species altogether if you include the Ovenbird (also a ‘wood warbler’) we heard at White Rock. Darcy did manage to get photos of all observed species (some were just record shots as the birds were moving around quite a bit and sure kept him on my toes as warblers usually do but also got some really nice ones as well). The rail line was quite productive and species seen included PALM WARBLER [Paruline à couronne rousse], YELLOW WARBLER [Paruline jaune], YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER [Paruline à croupion jaune], MAGNOLIA WARBLER [Paruline à tête cendrée], BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER [Paruline noir et blanc], AMERICAN REDSTART [Paruline flamboyante], NORTHERN PARULA [Paruline à collier], BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER [Paruline à gorge noire] and BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER [Paruline bleue]. These were the first warblers of the year for Darcy and Northern Parula was a lifer so he was quite pleased! Was a fantastic day and the weather, birds and company were top notch indeed! The trip to White Rock Recreational Area added a FOY (first-of-year) BLUE-HEADED VIREO [Viréo à tête bleue], and female YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER [Pic maculé] to his species list. He went back to the rail trail after the outing just to see what he could see, and actually added another two warbler species to the day list; a BLACKPOLL WARBLER and a CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER which made for a total warbler count of 12 species!  I feel there were probably even a few more species lurking around. The 50 or so BLUEJAYS that flew over was also quite a spectacle to see!

 

**Ray Gauvin sends a photo of his 16-year-old,25 ft. high Star Magnolia. In its 3rd week of blooming, it’s very close to full bloom and losing its pedals already.

It started losing pedals last week in the heavy rain and wind.

Presently it has a beautiful aroma. Unfortunately, the flowers only last a short time, usually 3 weeks and after shedding, to make way for beautiful green leaves all summer.

 

 

**Doreen Rossiter in Alma reports that she has never had such diversity and such high numbers of birds in her yard and that is really significant as traditionally Doreen has one of the more active feeder yards.  Every expected regular is present in very significant numbers with the exception of the Rose-Breasted Grosbeak, which will probably be there today!  A BALTIMORE ORIOLE [Oriole de Baltimore] arrived to enjoy clementines, a GRAY CATBIRD [Moqueur chat] is at the suet feeder with the YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS [Paruline à croupion jaune] and a pair of NORTHERN CARDINAL [Cardinal rouge] dropped by early Sunday morning.

 

**Jane and Eddie Leblanc canoed out on a lake near their St. Martin’s home on Sunday.  Eddy manned the paddle and Jane took full advantage to get some great COMMON LOON [Plongeon huard]
photos.

As an interesting aside Jane also have photographed Calico pennant Dragonflies [Libellules fanion calico] at the same lake in later season. 

Jane also had a first spring male ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK [Cardinal à poitrine rose] visit her yard on Sunday.  Note the reduced red patch on the chest, dark spotting on the breast and the mantle area not dense black to indicate immaturity.

 

**Peter Gadd has had his first visit from a GRAY CATBIRD [Moqueur chat]to his Miramichi yard and pleased to partake of a diverse arrival diet of fresh orange with a juicy sizable earthworm as a chaser.  Some of Peter’s photos show a bit of the cinnamon undertail covert of the Gray Catbird. 

The male, RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER [Pic à ventre roux] that the Gadds’ have hosted all winter is still dropping by occasionally and looking very prime for spring.  One can even see the red blush on the belly.  If only a mate was in the area for this handsome male, interesting things could happen.  I expect the singles’ bars are fairly sparce for match-making for the species!

 

**Daryl Doucette had a pair of Northern Cardinals pay an early morning visit to his Moncton yard again, hopefully a nearby nesting is imminent.

 

**Gordon Rattray had 2 species to his Weldon yard Sunday that were new for him to the yard.  The NASHVILLE WARBLER [Paruline à joues grises] photos nicely show the white eye-ring, lack of wing bars, grey head and yellow throat.  A NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD [Moqueur polyglotte] also settled for a co-operative photo and less co-operative photo to flash its white wing patches as it lifted off.


**Aldo Dorio got a photo of a NORTHERN FLICKER [Pic flamboyant] having chosen a cavity nest site as real estate at Hay Island.  The photo seemed to indicate a male with black moustache. The lady of the house must be nearby.


**Mac Wilmot in Lower Coverdale notes there is an amount of sod tumbling down the eroding bank when the new channel was breached and the Petitcodiac River starts to recover its former channel.

Mac points out for weeks they could only see the head of a BALD EAGLE [Pygargue à tête blanche] above the rim of the nest at Bud Creek.  He is wondering if perhaps there has been a hatch as the adult is often on the rim of the nest now.

Mac also photographed a CANADA GOOSE [Bernache du Canada] and her goslings not particularly concerned with the slippery slope of the Petitcodiac River bank at low tide.


**Mathieu Carroll points out a mushroom we found in very high numbers in a burn over site the past week is now called the Stalked Bonfire Cup.  Gary Lincoff refers to them as Pyxie Cups.  Sometimes with mushrooms for certain identity the scientific name is needed.  One of Mathieu’s photos is attached.

One that we were really seeking was the true Morel and did find modest numbers of the BLACK MOREL (Morchella elata) which is the most choice edible I have ever savoured.  We had them sauteed with Striped Bass filet for Saturday night and the same haute cuisine was repeated on Sunday evening.  They are classed as choice in the Lincoff guide, I would class them as delectable.  Photos attached of the single mushroom.


**A male YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER [Pic maculé] has arrived to sample the menu of our camp feeders.  Their choice is normally jam which is in the orange-coloured feeder.  Holes in the bottom of the cups let some jam drip onto the peanut butter below and the Yellow-Bellied Sapsucker is finding the peanut butter and jam a haute cuisine choice.  Usually, a female soon follows and the youngsters when they fledge.

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

 

WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW AND WHITE THROATED SPARROW. MAY 15 2021. STELLA LEBLANC


GRAY CATBIRD. MAY 16, 2021. PETER GADD

GRAY CATBIRD. MAY 16, 2021. PETER GADD

GRAY CATBIRD. MAY 16, 2021. PETER GADD

COMMON LOON. MAY 16, 2021.  JANE LEBLANC

COMMON LOON. MAY 16, 2021.  JANE LEBLANC

COMMON LOON. MAY 16, 2021.  JANE LEBLANC

RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER. MAY 16, 2021. PETER GADD

ROSE BREASTED GROSBEAK (1st SPRING MALE) MAY 16, 2021. JANE LEBLANC

AMERICAN REDSTART (MALE). MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY

BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER. MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY

BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER (MALE). MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY.

BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLER. MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY.

BLACKPOLL WARBLER. MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY

BLUE-HEADED VIREO. MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY

CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER. MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY

MAGNOLIA WARBLER. MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY

NORTHERN PARULA WARBLER. MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY

PALM WARBLER. MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY

YELLOW WARBLER (MALE). MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER. MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY

NASHVILLE WARBLER. MAY 16, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

NASHVILLE WARBLER. MAY 16, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

BALD EAGLE NEST (MUD CREEK). MAY 16, 2021. MAC WILMOT

CANADA GOOSE AND GOSLINGS. MAY 16, 2021. MAC WILMOT

NORTHERN FLICKER. MAY 16, 2021. ALDO DORIO

NORTHERN FLICKER. MAY 16, 2021. ALDO DORIO

NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD. MAY 16, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD. MAY 16, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY



YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER. MAY 15, 2021. ANDREW DARCY

BLACK MOREL MUSHROOM (MORCHELLA ELATA). MAY 15, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

BLACK MOREL MUSHROOM (MORCHELLA ELATA). MAY 15, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

STALKED BONFIRE CUP MUSHROOM (Geopyxis carbonaria). MAY 15, 2021. MATHIEU CARROLL

STAR MAGNOLIA TREE. MAY 16, 2021. RAY GAUVIN

PETITCODIAC RIVER CHANNEL REFORMONG. MAY 16, 2021. MAC WILMOT


YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER. MAY 15, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER. MAY 15, 2021. NELSON POIRIER