Monday, 21 June 2021

June 21 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, June 21, 2021 (Monday)

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by Fred Richards susan_richards@rogers.com

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

**Mother Nature can sure change plans quickly. With the strong possibility of the tropical storm coming through late Monday and Tuesday, the first regular Nature Moncton evening outings is postponed until Thursday June 24, 2021 at 6:30.  We will run the announcement again on Wednesday and Thursday.

**The cultivar Hascap Berry has become popular with their tasty fruit.  The Cedar Waxwings have gone on the alert and have arrived at Lois Budd’s Hascap crop to enjoy it with Lois.  Lois comments the waxwing’s buzzing vocalization serenade is so pleasant that she is leaving some to share with them. Lois sent some photos of the Hascap bushes and blue berries that I suspect many of us are unfamiliar with.

**Groundhogs are commonly seen in rural areas but it was a bit of a surprise for my next-door neighbor in the midst of an urban subdivision to see a Groundhog in their backyard appearing to come from under the shed, with very little exposed area to get underneath.  The animal did not seem to show concern about humans near and was easily photographed with a cellphone.  This animal is either very street smart or lucky to cross a number of streets to get to where it was seen. Sunday was the first day they saw it.  There is no garden or any apparent forage opportunities in the yard.  It is getting quite common for White-tailed Deer and Red Fox to adapt to urban areas and people, and wonder if Groundhogs are doing the same thing.

 

**Maybe we should include the MALLARD DUCK as another adapting urbanite. Kathy Breaton who tunes in from Kitchener, Ontario had a female mallard stroll across her very urban yard this morning as many folks are seeing in recent years and not infrequently nesting in yards and public places very successfully.

 

**Brian Stone walked the roads and trails behind Crandall University on Sunday to find many things to photograph. Several types of butterflies were present and 6 of those were photographed going about their business. A pair of VICEROY BUTTERFLIES were caught in a mating embrace, 2 COMMON RINGLET BUTTERFLIES showed both the presence and absence of the "ring", a LITTLE WOOD-SATYR BUTTERFLY proved difficult to shoot clearly, a NORTHERN CRESCENT BUTTERFLY perched nicely on a stem of grass, and a fresh-looking WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY was intensely focused on some animal scat.

 

A good variety of flies were busy in the area including a female EUROPEAN DRONE FLY and a ROBBER FLY. A CUTWORM WASP was investigating the side of the Gorge Rd. near the University and a male COMMON WHITETAIL DRAGONFLY perched for a bit near the larger pond. The big puddles on the road/trails were completely dry now, and even the larger pond was much lower than at the same time last year. Brian fears that the abundant pond life might be in for a difficult year. (Editor’s note: the forecast for a tropical depression remnants may come to the rescue)

 

Plant life imaged were LUPINS gone to seed, LITTLE EVENING PRIMROSE aka SMALL SUNDROPS, FLEABANE, HONEYSUCKLE, SPEEDWELL (Editor note: note the characteristic one smaller petal of the 4 in the speedwell family), and some small Spruce Trees were heavily laden with new cones. Brian managed to look up from scanning the ground and low plant life long enough to get a nice photo of a WHITE-THROATED SPARROW that seemed to be curious as to why someone with a large camera was pointing it towards the ground so often.

 

 

 

**I was in my natal neighborhood of Scotch Settlement-MacDougall Settlement on Saturday and pleasantly surprised to note that 3 old neighbours had a pair of EASTERN BLUEBIRDS nesting on their property and two of them had small developing colonies of CLIFF SWALLOWS.

Margaret Murray and Jim Johnson are Nature Moncton members and Jim’s brother Winston has a pair of nesting bluebirds. If there are that many bluebirds in this small area, I wonder how many there really are about the province.  I suspect the real number is as high as they have been in a long time.  There have been many other actual reports of nesting pairs of Eastern Bluebirds this season.

But, am wondering where are all those Northern Cardinals, that were around all winter in many areas of New Brunswick that had few nesting pairs.

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

 

WHITE-THROATED SPARROW. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

CEDAR WAXWINGS. JUNE 20, 2021. LOIS BUDD

CEDAR WAXWINGS ENJOYING HASKAP BERRIES. JUNE 20, 2021. LOIS BUDD

HASKAP BERRIES. JUNE 20, 2021.  LOIS BUDD

MALLARD DUCK (URBAN). JUNE 21, 2021. KATHY BREATON

GROUNDHOG. JUNE 20, 2021. SHARON PITZEL

VICEROY BUTTERFLIES. JUNE 20, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

VICEROY BUTTERFLIES. JUNE 20, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY. JUNE 20, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY. JUNE 20, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

LITTLE WOOD-SATYR BUTTERFLY. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

EUROPEAN SKIPPER BUTTERFLY. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

COMMON RINGLET BUTTERFLY. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

COMMON RINGLET BUTTERFLY (NO RING). JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

NORTHERN CRESCENT BUTTERFLY. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE


COMMON WHITETAIL DRAGONFLY (MALE). JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

CUTWORM WASP (PODALONIA). JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

EUROPEAN DRONE FLY. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

ROBBER FLY. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE


FLEABANE. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

HONEYSUCKLE. JUNE 20, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

LUPINS GONE TO SEED. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

SMALL SUNDROPS OR LITTLE EVENING PRIMROSE. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

SPEEDWELL. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

SPEEDWELL. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

SMALL SUNDROPS OR LITTLE EVENING PRIMROSE. JUNE 20, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

SPRUCE CONES. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

SPRUCE CONES. JUNE 20, 2021. BRIAN STONE

 



Sunday, 20 June 2021

June 20 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, June 20, 2021 (Sunday)

 

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

** Much of Mother Nature’s world is sporting families at the moment.  Jane LeBlanc came across a mass of SPIDERLINGS in a spider web on her St. Martins home deck to get a photograph.  A large family unit!

 

**David Cannon comments he able to see lots of ducks while golfing at the Maplewood Golf Club in Irishtown. All the ponds have families in them. They have a beaver as well, and plenty of muskrats. David sends a photo of HOODED MERGANSERS in the 14th hole pond. Note the orange on the lower mandible in one bird that is always present in the female at all maturities.

 

Anita Cannon spotted a SAY’S CICADA resting on the side of their house on Saturday and Sunday. Eighteen hours later it was still there. Its body is 34 mm long, including its folded wings. This insect emerges from the ground to become the adult that would normally head up into a tree and make its loud high pitched metallic buzz on hot days. I would assume in this case, it emerged from the ground but did not head out on its mating mission due to the cooler day of Saturday but may well proceed in today’s warmth if to its satisfaction.

 

**John Inman reports he has had a pair of EASTERN BLUEBIRDS checking out a nest box the last couple of days, but they seem to have moved on. John comments perhaps it may be the location of nest box. It would have been his first nesting pair. Other than that, John says it has been very slow in his 225 Mary’s Point Road site.

 

 

 

** Lisa Morris noted some interesting clear tracks on a soft mud shoreline in Richibucto on Friday.  The tracks led to the water and are consistent with that of a RIVER OTTER [Loutre de rivière].  Note the roundness of the five digits showing in the excellent mud substrate.  Accurate measurements of stride and trail are helpful, but the possibility of dealing with younger smaller animals at this point complicates it. 

 

** We are advertising the first of Nature Moncton’s Tuesday evening events early as this happens to be the first one of this potentially great idea to seek out new spots to naturalize.  All details of the first event are attached below and will be repeated the next few days.  No registration is necessary.  Just bring your curiosity and enthusiasm.

 

First Tuesday Night Nature Moncton Walk.  June 22, 2021, 6:30 PM.

This is the first in a series of nature walks to view some of the wonderful natural areas in the region.  This week we will be walking a loop trail that is located at the Dobson trailhead in Riverview. This walk will take about an hour and a half and cover a little over two kilometers.  The trail is forested all along and follows Mill creek for the first half then loops back. The trail is a little hilly and there are quite a few tree roots so good walking shoes are a good idea. The cost is a toonie for non-members. Members and children 12 and under are free. We will meet at the trail head parking lot (there are two lots, we will be starting from the second one) and the walk will start at 6:30. If you could be there by 6:15 so we can cover the Covid rules. The lot is located on Pine Glen Road 0.7 km. south of the intersection of Gunningsville Blvd. and Pine Glen Road.  The Richards went there Friday evening at 6:15 and the traffic on the bridge was not bad at that time.

Sue and Fred previewed it and viewed some birds, a snake, some freshly released Grey Squirrels from Atlantic Wildlife institute and a lot of plant life including some Pink Lady’s Slippers.  There were quite a few mosquitoes, but a liberal application of repellent kept them from bothering us.  Covid rules will apply but there is lots of room for physical distancing.  We are hoping you can come out and take in this beautiful spot and enjoy an evening stroll with us.

The Dobson trail is the longest volunteer-maintained trail in eastern Canada.  It runs from the trailhead in Riverview to Fundy Park. 

 

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

HOODED MERGANSER. JUNE 19, 2021. DAVID CANNON

EASTERN BLUEBIRD (MALE) JUNE 19, 2021. JOHN INMAN

EASTERN BLUEBIRD (FEMALE) JUNE 19, 2021. JOHN INMAN

SAY'S CICADA. JUNE 19, 2021. DAVID CANNON

SPIDERLINGS. JUNE 19, 2021. JANE LEBLANC

RIVER OTTER PAW PRINT (SUSPECTED). JUNE 19, 2021. LISA MORRIS

MUSHROOM. JUNE 19, 2021. LISA MORRIS

 



Saturday, 19 June 2021

June 19 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE. June 19, 2021 (Saturday)

 

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

 

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Catherine Clements

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

**A heads-up that next Tuesday evening (June 22nd) will be the first of the regular Tuesday evening outings of Nature Moncton to local points of interest that are planned to run 1 ½-2 hours. President Fred Richards has orchestrated this idea. The one this coming week will be to the Dobson Trail head, with more details as to time and meeting place to follow.

 

**There have been reports of some SANDHILL CRANE [Grue du Canada] action again in Jolicure, so Louise Nichols checked it out on Thursday and did see one in a ploughed field off the Parson Road close to Highway 16. Although the feathers are often grey, sometimes they can have a reddish-brown appearance. This is because Sandhill Cranes preen themselves by rubbing mud on their feathers and mud from iron-rich environments is often red. I would assume they would have lots of opportunity to do this in the area Louise took this photograph showing this adult bird with this much brown.

 

 All day Thursday in their yard, Louise kept hearing a bird call, just one fairly loud sharp note over and over again. She could not see the bird until the evening when it came out more in the open and she discovered it was a fledgling HERMIT THRUSH [Grive solitaire]. She got a video of it calling. Just a reminder that sometimes the calls of fledglings can stump us. Listen to what Louise heard at the attached link.

 

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/k5x2yjuegrn7pw2/HERMIT%20THRUSH%20FLEDGLING%20CALLING.%20JUNE%2017%2C%202021.%20LOUISE%20NICHOLS.MOV?dl=0

 

 

 

 Elaine Gallant, Wendy Sullivan, and Louise went out to Cape Jourimain on Thursday afternoon. One interesting observation was the DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS [Cormoran à aigrettes] nesting on the PEI Confederation Bridge pylons where there is a bit of a shelf. There were nests on seeming every shelf pylon that they could see, with cormorants sitting on eggs.

This reminds me of a bridge in Pictou, Nova Scotia that is lined with a very large colony of Double-crested Cormorants nesting right beside very busy traffic.

 

**Cynthia MacKenzie photographed a SPRING PEEPER [Rainette crucifère] in her Moncton yard. The Spring Peeper only goes to water in the spring to breed, then returns to land, and we can see them almost anywhere during the summer and fall seasons. They do make vocalizations that can almost sound like a bird in a tree as a solo vocalizer, not by the dozen as in the spring.

Cynthia also got a photo of the beautiful COLUMBIA SILKMOTH [Saturnie du mélèze].This has similarities to the large CECROPIA MOTH [Saturnie cécropia] but is smaller.

 

**Wayne Fairchild got a great photo of a spread-out very fresh-looking unblemished CANADIAN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL [Papillon tigré du Canada] enjoying their yard LILAC [Lilas] bush, as so many nectaring insects are, at the peak of the blooming of the Lilac window.

 

**Lois Budd was surprised to see red berries on a shrub in her yard already. Lois sends a photo, and the berries show the twin ovary typical of one of our Honeysuckle [Chèvrefeuille] species. Other berries that ripen early would be Serviceberry [Amélanchier], and Lois comments that her cultivar HASKAP [Camerise] berries are nearly ready for harvest.

 

**Gordon Rattray sends a photo of a HOBOMOK SKIPPER BUTTERFLY. Note the clear spatulate apex of the antennae typical of the skippers, instead of the club shape typical of butterflies.

 

**Brian Stone shares more images from his walk in the White Rock Recreational Area in Hillsborough on Thursday. He saw several varieties of dragonfly including a female DOT-TAILED WHITEFACE, male and female CHALK-FRONTED CORPORALS, several LANCET CLUBTAILS, and many female COMMON WHITETAILS. Butterflies photographed were DREAMY DUSKYWING, SILVERY BLUE, NORTHERN CRESCENT, and lots of HOBOMOK SKIPPERS.

 

A pair of DARK-EYED JUNCOS made an effort to harass Brian as he walked the trail, likely wanting him to move away from their nesting area. Some smaller life photographed included a BEE FLY, a CRANE FLY, WATER STRIDERS, a HAIRY FLOWER SCARAB BEETLE (aka BEE MIMIC BEETLE), and a TOOTHED SOMBERWING MOTH.

 

As reported in the previous edition he then managed to find the WESTERN TAILED-BLUE and NORTHERN CLOUDYWING butterflies to complete his outing. As he finished his photography the rain started having been kind enough to wait until he was ready to leave.

 

**Aldo Dorio photographed the colourful ROSY MAPLE MOTH day perching on Saturday morning.

 

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

 

SANDHILL CRANE. JUNE 17, 2021. LOUISE NICHOLS

DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS NESTING ON CONFEDERATION BRIDGE. JUNE 17, 2021. LOUISE NICHOLS

DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS NESTING ON CONFEDERATION BRIDGE. JUNE 17, 2021. LOUISE NICHOLS

DARK-EYED JUNCO. JUNE 17, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

HERMIT THRUSH FLEDGLING. JUNE 17, 2021. LOUISE NICHOLS

CANADIAN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL. JUNE 18, 2021. WAYNE FAIRCHILD

DREAMY DUSKYWING BUTTERFLY. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

NORTHERN CRESCENT BUTTERFLY. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

SILVERY BLUE BUTTERFLY. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

HOBOMOK SKIPPER. JUN 17, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

HOBOMOK SKIPPER BUTTERFLY. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

HOBOMOK SKIPPER BUTTERFLY. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

HOBOMOK SKIPPER BUTTERFLY. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

HOBOMOK SKIPPER BUTTERFLY. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

COLUMBIA SILKMOTH. JUNE 18, 2021. CYNTHIA MacKENZIE

COLUMBIA SILKMOTH. JUNE 18, 2021. CYNTHIA MacKENZIE

ROSY MAPLE MOTH. JUNE 19, 2021. ALDO DORIO

CHALK-FRONTED CORPORAL DRAGONFLY (MALE). JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

CHALK-FRONTED CORPORAL DRAGONFLY (FEMALE). JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

COMMON WHITETAIL DRAGONFLY (FEMALE). JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

DOT-TAILED WHITEFACE DRAGONFLY (FEMALE). JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

LANCET CLUBTAIL DRAGONFLY. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

WATER STRIDERS. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

BEE FLY. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

BEE MIMIC BEETLE OR HAIRY FLOWER SCARAB. JUNE 17, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

BEE MIMIC BEETLE OR HAIRY FLOWER SCARAB. JUNE 17, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

CRANE FLY. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

COLUMBINE IN BLOOM. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

HONEYSUCKLE. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

HONEYSUCKLE. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

HONEYSUCKLE. JUNE 18, 2021. LOIS BUDD

TWINFLOWERS. JUNE 17, 2021. BRIAN STONE

 
SPRING PEEPER. JUNE 18, 2021. CYNTHIA MacKENZIE