Wednesday, 3 March 2021

March 3 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 03, 2021 (Wednesday)  

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

**Clara Thaysen from NB Environmental Network sends a reminder on the webinar on tonight many naturalists may be interesting in joining in on. Set your phone alarm now to not forget. Clara’s note below:

 

“A friendly reminder that the fourth installment of the NB Wildlife Webinar Series is TONIGHT, TUESDAY MARCH 3 AT 6:30 PM. Join us to learn all about eiders and other sea ducks from Scott Gilliland, a Wildlife Biologist from the Canadian Wildlife Service.

 

Link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/85468832179?pwd=T0xqLzZZNzBVMzM1Y054bm9BWW9tZz09


Webinar ID: 
854 6883 2179
Passcode: 
133804

See you tonight! 

Clara”

 

 

** As we experienced on Tuesday the wind was wild and cold. Daryl Doucet’s resident female EASTERN TOWHEE [Tohi à flancs roux] found it a bit windy as well. Daryl took a few photos of it being wind-tossed. Folks report that the birds seemed to be very appreciative of feeders on Tuesday.

 

** Bev Schneider in Douglas near Fredericton has had a RED-SHOULDERED HAWK [Buse à épaulettes] visit her each year for 5 years acting similarly and suspects it to be the same bird. Bev sent a video of it to be shared on last night’s virtual birdfeeder tour but a glitch would not let it play. Take a look at this beautiful uncommon to New Brunswick raptor at the attached video link.

 

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/4qajcu3hby1yanr/Red-shouldered%20Hawk%20-%20Bev%20Schneider.m4v?dl=0

 

 

** Maureen Girvan leaves an interesting scenario after the virtual birdfeeder tour on Tuesday night. Maureen comments that she lives in an apartment and has hanging flower baskets in the summer and in the winter, she puts bird seeds on top of the soil and the birds love it. What a nice suggestion!

 

** Brian Coyle shares another trail camera video of a FISHER, assuming it to be the same one that he got track/trail photos of earlier. Note the trail leading up to the animal of the large tracks and a distance apart to indicate bounds, typical of the Mustelidae group of mammals. The animal also has a very dark pelage and a bushy tail typical of the Fisher. Take a look at the action at the link below, maybe playing it over a few times as we shortened it up to just include the action pass.

 

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/eqb3oxtpafdwslf/Fisher%20-%20Brian%20Coyle.mp4?dl=0

 

 

**Rheal Vienneau sends a link to an interview with one of the very respected gurus of MONARCH BUTTERFLY migration, Lincoln Brower. He is interviewed at a site in Mexico with all the migrated butterflies in the background the background and will be very interesting for Monarch Butterfly enthusiasts. When the link opens, there is another option to click on the view the video interview.

https://www.monarchscience.org/single-post/that-time-i-interviewed-lincoln-brower-on-a-mountaintop-in-mexico

 

Brian also points out that the White-tailed Deer carcass is located near the road at the railway crossing the Lower Mountain Road, not the Upper Mountain Road as reported yesterday (Editor’s  error)

 

 

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




 

EASTERN TOWHEE. MARCH 2, 2021.  DARYL DOUCET
EASTERN TOWHEE. MARCH 2, 2021.  DARYL DOUCET


EASTERN TOWHEE. MARCH 2, 2021.  DARYL DOUCET

 

Tuesday, 2 March 2021

March 2 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March, 2 2021 (Tuesday)

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by Susan Richards susan_richards@rogers.com

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

**Last call to Nature Moncton Virtual Feeder Tour on tonight, Tuesday at 7 p.m.  Anyone anywhere can join in to hear and see bird feeder ideas, birds and comments at the attached link.  Set your phone clock for 6:50 p.m. tonight, right now!

https://meet.google.com/hnq-hkkh-qjk

**As you may remember Brian Coyle came across a FISHER track/trails recently being certain it was a Fisher by the print size and stride and also it just poked its face in front of his trail camera enough to know for sure.  If Brian’s camera had just been tilted slightly to the right it would have caught the body.  A Fisher in this area is uncommon but more common in central to northern New Brunswick.  Take a look at the brief peek of the Fisher at the attached link.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/k84xp3042vmlwoa/DSCF0008.AVI?dl=0

 

        Also, earlier in the season, Brian got some great footage of a sow BLACK BEAR [Ours noir] nursing 3 playful cubs.  Brian sends two more videos that shows the sow Bear (the one with the cinnamon colour on the snout) and a much larger boar Bear in another video.  Check out the action at the links below.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/ozioa60xe1p2mze/STC_0147.AVI?dl=0

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/xekq28aiothaprk/STC_0152.AVI?dl=0

 

  These are all captured by that same huge boulder in a field across from Brian’s home near the woods edge.  It seems to be a real gathering point for several wildlife species that Brian’s trail camera has captured aimed at that rock.  One cannot help but wonder how that large boulder arrived there in the first place with seemingly broken off pieces around it.

             On Monday, Brian came across 2 WHITE-TAILED DEER [Cerf de Virginie] carcasses.  One was noted at the juncture of the Isaiah Road and Route 126 in the field on the opposite side of the road from Isaiah Road.  Not a great place to stop for photos but Brian was able to get some still pictures of 3 BALD EAGLES [Pygargue à tête blanche] at the carcass.  One is an adult with silt-stained white tail from the Petitcodiac river banks, but the plumage on another shows it as a subadult very likely to reach mature plumage this season and another well into its third year from the bill colour.  Brian also spotted another White-Tailed Deer carcass that was apparently struck by a train as it was near the road just off the railway tracks at the crossing on Lower Mountain Road.  RAVENS [Grand corbeau] and Crows[corbeau] were at it but likely another eagle target.

**Dale Gaskin reports he is getting a nice diversity of patrons to his Dawson Settlement feeder yard, but something he is noting the last few days caught his attention.  He has noted two different flocks of 25-30 PINE GROSBEAK [Durbec des sapins] picking at gravel along the roadside edge on his road and on the Pine Glen Road.

**There are still ample free swallow nest boxes ready to go to be ready for the TREE SWALLOW [Hirondelle bicolore] and EASTERN BLUEBIRDS [OISEAUX BLEU DE L'EST] to check out when they start arriving next month.  Chief carpenter Fred Richards built a nice supply this season.  Anyone wanting some can leave their name and they can be picked up in town, or if in the Taylor Village area, at Fred Richards’ workshop.

      

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

 

BALD EAGLE ON DEER CARCASS. MARCH 1, 2021.  BRIAN COYLE

BALD EAGLE ON DEER CARCASS. MARCH 1, 2021.  BRIAN COYLE

BALD EAGLE ON DEER CARCASS (SUBADULT). MARCH 1, 2021. BRIAN COYLE

BALD EAGLE ON DEER CARCASS (IMMATURE). MARCH 1, 2021. BRIAN COYLE

 

Monday, 1 March 2021

March 1 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, Mar. 1, 2021 (Monday)

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by Susan Richards susan_richards@rogers.com

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

**The Nature Moncton Annual Feeder Tour is on virtually for tomorrow night Tuesday at 7 p.m.  There are several presenters lined up to share bird feeder ideas and the special birds.  With it being virtual, some bird feeder folk from around New Brunswick, are able to share some of their actin without any of us having to leave our home.  The link for anyone anywhere to join in is attached below:

https://meet.google.com/hnq-hkkh-qjk

**Marco Vachon in Memramcook does like birding and watching birds coming to feeders on his property.  He always has the odd raptor coming to watch the feeders, but this week it was amazing the number of raptors that came by.  First was a MERLIN [Faucon émerillon] perched high in a big tree staring at the feeders for over an hour.  Then an adult SHARP-SHINNED HAWK [Épervier brun] on a successful hunt grabbing a COMMON REDPOLL [Sizerin flammé].  Two days later, an immature SHARP-SHINNED HAWK [Épervier brun] also got an unidentified small prey.  Finally, on Saturday an adult NORTHERN GOSHAWK [Autour des palombes] flew by and staged around the feeders for a few minutes to leave toward the forested areas.  The goshawk flew right over, near Marco while he was standing outside:  over-all grey and paler underneath with a blackish crown, and cheek with that white eyebrow (supercilium).  He got some great photos of the Merlin and also some immature and mature Sharp-shinned Hawks.  Unfortunately, he wasn’t able to capture the more impatient goshawk.  Marco noted this week, the mature Sharp-Shinned Hawk took down a BLUE JAY [Geai bleu] to suggest that it was probably the larger female as the smaller male is not much bigger than a Blue Jay itself.

   To get a diversity of raptors like that, Marco obviously has an active bird-feeder yard.

**Pat Gibbs got a photo of an immature COOPER'S HAWK [Épervier de Cooper] showing features of the narrow streaked elongated tear-drop breast markings, lighter areas between the crown and the nape to give the capped crown look, heavy set legs and a yellow eye to indicate immaturity.  Pat saw it on the Riverfront Trail between Shopper’s Drug Mart and Chateau Moncton.

Pat also photographed a ROCK PIGEON showing some of the plumage surprises we see in the wild now from domestic pigeon breeding.

**Pat and I did a run to the Tantramar Marsh and area on Sunday afternoon.  Roads were a bit testy and saw little in the accessible areas.  A few HORNED LARK [Alouette hausse-col] were at the two farm areas, but not the large numbers recently reported at the time we passed.  We did check the Beaubassin Research Station Road and a bit surprised to see a SHORT-EARED OWL [Hibou des marais] hunting there mid-afternoon but went down after being spotted so no photo.  I wonder if that would suggest it would be quite hungry to be foraging mid-afternoon on a sunny day.

**Bob Blake keeps daily weather statistics from his 2nd North River home, including morning low temperatures, daily high temperatures and monthly precipitation.  Bob sends a table comparing February of 2020 and February 2021.  Was a bit surprised to note, we had noticeably more snow in February 2021 than last February however this February was in general warmer and some rain we did not have at all last February.

 

2020

2021

morning temperatures

daily highs

morning temperatures

daily highs

-22-1 day

-20-1

-19-1

-18-3

-14-1

-12-1

-9-1

-8-2

-7-2

-6-1

-5-2

-4-4

-3-2

-2-1

-1-3

0-2

 +7-2

+6-1

+5-1

+3-1

+2-5

+1-8

57 cms. snow

-18-1 day

-17-1

-14-1

-13-2

-12-4

-11-2

-9-2

-7-1

-6-1

-5-1

-4-2

-3-2

-2-1

0-1

+1-4

+2-1

+3-1

+4-3

+3-3

+2-2

+1-1

78 cms. snow

20mms. rain

 

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

 

SHARP-SHINED HAWK. (IMMATURE) FEB. 25, 2021.  MARCO VACHON
MERLIN. FEB. 22, 2021. MARCO VACHON

SHARP-SHINED HAWK. FEB. 23, 2021. MARCO VACHON

COOPER'S HAWK. (IMMATURE)FEB. 28, 2021.  PAT GIBBS

ROCK PIGEON. FEB 28, 2021. PAT GIBBS

 



Sunday, 28 February 2021

Feb 28 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, February 28, 2021 (Sunday)

 

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

** Carol Shea had a SHARP-SHINNED HAWK [Épervier brun] visit her Upham feeder yard on Saturday to check out the menu.  It is quite well-hidden, but the hooded, not-capped crown and neck suggest it over a Cooper’s Hawk.  Note that it is an adult with the red eye and transverse breast barring.

 

 

** Louise Nichols responds to the comments on yesterday’s edition that SNOWSHOE HARE [Lièvre d'Amérique] numbers may seem down this year.  This obviously varies by location as Louise comments the woods around their Aulac home have lots of Snowshoe Hare tracks and trails.

 

 

** Jane LeBlanc comments that it was so pleasant to see the full Moon set on Saturday morning over the St. Martins beach even though it was still daylight in the photo that Jane shares.

 

 

** Roger Leblanc advises that the lineup for the virtual bird-feeding tour set for this coming Tuesday night at 7:00 is almost full, but always room for one more.  A link will be posted in tomorrow’s edition for anyone anywhere to join in to listen to the commentaries and see photos of different favourite feeder set-ups and special birds.  The formal write-up is attached below:

 

VIRTUAL BIRD FEEDER TOUR

DATE: TUESDAY MARCH 2, AT 7:00 PM

 

Because of the pandemic, Nature Moncton cannot offer its beloved annual bird feeder tour which normally brings us together in mid-winter for a day of birds, friendship and food.  So this year, we’ve decided to offer a virtual gathering which can at least bring us together online to share our winter bird feeding experiences.

Our plan is to have about 6 or 7 presenters for this event with each presentation taking no more than 10 minutes.  So those of you who have good feeder yards, send us some photos or videos of the action at your place.  We would like to see your best photos of birds that visit, especially any unusual feeder birds, but we would also like to see your feeder set-up.  Do you have a special feeder that works well, or an arrangement of feeders that helps bring in the desired birds while keeping the less desired out?  Do you find a particular food more attractive to certain species?  Let us know how your feeder system works, so we can all learn from each other’s successes!

If you are interested in participating in sharing your feeder yard, please send your best photos or videos to Roger Leblanc at parus@nb.sympatico.ca, no later than midnight on February 27th.  Roger will put all material received together in a PowerPoint presentation, so you will not have to worry about that.  On the day of the virtual event, Fred Richards will take care of the technical sharing of the PowerPoint, so all you need to do is provide some commentary and stories about your material while Fred is showing the visuals.  As we would like to limit each presentation to a maximum of 10 minutes, we ask that each participant limit their number of photos/videos accordingly, perhaps to no more than 10.

We cannot be together in person, but we can still come together online and share our bird feeding adventures while enjoying some coffee, hot chocolate, or a glass of wine in the comfort of our own homes!

 

 nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




SHARP-SHINNED HAWK. FEB 27, 2021. CAROL SHEA


MOONSET AT ST. MARTINS. FEB. 27, 2021. JANE LEBLANC

 

Saturday, 27 February 2021

Feb 28 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, 27 February 2021 (Saturday)

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor,
nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in
wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**The recent light snowfall over a crust has made it great for tracks for wildlife
that are not heavy enough to break through. Mac Wilmot came across BOBCAT
[Lynx roux] tracks/trail in his Lower Coverdale backyard and field. The stride was
12-14 in. which is within the 10-16 in. suggested for Bobcat. The
tracks are rounded, some show the offset feature, and no claw marks are noted.
Young of the year Bobcats will have recently been sent abruptly on their own.
They tend to be out more in the open or nearer human habitation, searching for
food.


**Brian Stone also took advantage of the snow conditions to check out tracks and
trails on the trail at the back of the Irishtown Nature Park on Friday, commenting
it was a beautiful day to be in that location. He noted some nice trails of GROUSE
[Tétras] showing the characteristic foot pad with the hind toe slightly deviated,
the stride of 8 inches which is within the suggested average, and the trail often
fairly straight. 
Brian also noted the track/trail suggestive of RACCOON [Raton
laveur] with the fingerlike toe pads, as well as the apparent trails of SHREW
[Musaraigne] or VOLE[Campagnol] pushing surface snowplow trails.
 A SNOWSHOE HARE [Lièvre d'Amérique] trail shows the two hind pads in front of the offset smaller front feet. Many have commented that Snowshoe Hare numbers are down this winter.


nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton

BOBCAT TRACKS-TRAIL. FEB 26, 2021.  MAC WILMOT

BOBCAT TRACKS-TRAIL. FEB 26, 2021.  MAC WILMOT

BOBCAT TRACKS-TRAIL. FEB 26, 2021.  MAC WILMOT

GROUSE TRACKS-TRAIL. FEB. 26, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

GROUSE TRACKS-TRAIL. FEB. 26, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

GROUSE TRACKS-TRAIL. FEB. 26, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

SHREW OR VOLE TRACKS-TRAIL. FEB. 26, 2021. BRIAN STONE
SNOWSHOE HARE TRACKS. FEB. 26, 2021. BRIAN STONE


RACCOON TRACKS (SUSPECTED). FEB. 26, 2021. BRIAN STONE

RACCOON TRACKS-TRAIL (SUSPECTED). FEB. 26, 2021. BRIAN STONE

 
IRISHTOWN NATURE PARK (BACK TRAIL). FEB. 26, 2021. BRIAN STONE

Friday, 26 February 2021

Feb 26 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, February 26, 2021 (Friday)

 

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

** Jane Wood reports she is still having a pair of NORTHERN CARDINAL [Cardinal rouge] patronizing her Riverview yard at least 4 times a week, feeding mostly on the ground.  A pair of RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES [Sittelle à poitrine rousse] are regular and one WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH [Sittelle à poitrine blanche] occasionally.  She has not seen or heard the Riverview CAROLINA WRENS [Troglodyte de Caroline] of last winter recently. 

Jane had another interesting visitor the past few days.  The first photos that were through a window made us consider a SONG SPARROW [Bruant chanteur] at first, but some later photos were convincing of a SAVANNAH SPARROW [Bruant des prés] and are attached.  We do not often get Savannah Sparrows to bird feeder yards.  Gilles Belliveau helped us confirm it as Savannah Sparrow over Song Sparrow and will quote Gilles below to learn from his comments.  Quoting Gilles:

 

“I am fairly sure it’s actually a Savannah Sparrow. It seems to lack the richer brown tones that a Song Sparrow would have and is more of black and gray on top with just a bit of a light brown contrasting patch on the primaries. There is a slight pinkish tone to the bill, there seems to be a pale yellow tone in the supraloral (more noticeable in one image), the lateral throat stripe seems rather thin. The streaking on the flanks seems blacker in tone. The tail seems a bit short for a Song and seems thin and has a slight notch. The mention of a central spot is not unexpected as the Savannah Sparrow will sometimes have a concentration of streaks in the center of the chest which can also sometimes almost appear like a spot in the center of the chest.”

 

 

** Jim Carroll has a lot of DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoisé] coming to his Quispamsis yard, and has been able to pick out some special ones.  A Dark-eyed Junco (cismontanus) Oregon/Slate-coloured showed up at his feeders with a tribe of other juncos.  It has been confirmed by eBird and is only the 2nd reported in the Maritimes by eBird.  The other was in Nova Scotia in 2018.  Jim thanks Paul Mansz and David Bell for assisting in the identification.  David Bell comments “Not quite a pure Oregon due to the dirty flanks (instead of clean rufous), extensive brown on the head, and sort of an odd bib shape.”  Jim also got his bird beside a bright PINE WARBLER [Paruline des pins] as a value-added bonus.

 

**Georges Brun noted the travelling duck troupe on the Petitcodiac River bank out from Chateau Moncton. On Sunday, a subadult BALD EAGLE flew in to check out the menu.  Georges assumes it to be a subadult 4 year old bird due to the near complete yellow bill.

The Red Fox was successful in its capture of a rodent.  Quite big!  Not sure what species it could be.  It was more concerned about its victim than the male Ring-Necked Pheasant walking about.

A Short-Eared Owl was also hunting the marsh.

With the weather getting warmer with some hard pack bank ice is already breaking downriver east of the bend of the Petitcodiac River.

 

 

** Cynthia MacKenzie adds to the conversation regarding the Japanese pheasant. 
She has also seen one in the Lutes Mountain (Zack Rd. area) in the last few months. 
She is keeping an eye out to get a good picture to share as it is full size/healthy
 looking, and very dark in colour and comments “absolutely beautiful!”
 After viewing the reports, Cynthia read about the Japanese hybrids but was not
 certain they were here in NB but now more convinced that is exactly what she saw.
 There are likely a few individuals in the area.

 

 

** The duck troupe certainly is making itself at home, moving in groups around the city to spots of their liking.  Susan Richards photographed 100+ in the yard of the new strip mall on Champlain St. on Thursday morning.  They tend to run over 95% MALLARDS [Canard colvert] with a few AMERICAN BLACK DUCKS [Canard noir], but it’s always worth perusing the group to see what surprises may be tagging along.

 

** It’s Friday and time to check in on what next week’s sky will share with us, courtesy of sky-guru Curt Nason.  The full moon at the moment makes the evenings bright on the snow, but we still can see Mars, Orion, etc. in the evenings, and Mercury and Jupiter for early risers.

 

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, 2021 February 27 – 2021 March 6
Two of the largest constellations are seen in the southwest and southeast around mid-evening. Eridanus the River flows from Rigel in Orion’s foot to the lower right, and then makes a sharp curve to the left before disappearing below the horizon. It doesn’t end there; it extends at least the same distance southward to terminate at Achernar, the ninth brightest star in the sky. Achernar, of course, means “the river’s end.” The star near Rigel is named Cursa, which means “the footstool.”  In terms of square degrees of sky, Eridanus is the sixth largest constellation. It has been associated with many earthly rivers but most often with the Po River in Italy, which the Greeks called Eridanos.

Hydra the female Water Snake rises out of the southeast, with its head reaching as high as Orion’s. A smaller constellation called Hydrus the male Water Snake is near Achernar and is never seen from New Brunswick. Hydra is the largest of the 88 constellations and one of the longest. If you consider the horizon as the ocean surface, and if you have all night, you can picture Hydra leaping completely out of the water and disappearing in a giant belly flop. Its brightest star, Alphard the “solitary one,” just makes the top 50 in terms of brightness. In mythology the Hydra was a multi-headed creature slain by Hercules as his second labour.

This Week in the Solar System    
Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 7:01 am and sunset will occur at 6:03 pm, giving 11 hours, 2 minutes of daylight (7:05 am and 6:09 pm in Saint John).  Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 6:48 am and set at 6:12 pm, giving 11 hours, 24 minutes of daylight (6:52 am and 6:18 pm in Saint John).

The Moon is full this Saturday, the Snow Moon or Mi’kmaw Snow Blinding Moon, and it is at third quarter next Friday. Mars makes a scenic, colour-contrasting binocular view with the Pleaides all this week, making its closest pass on Thursday. Mercury is in close conjunction with Jupiter on Friday morning, one day before its greatest elongation from the Sun.  Both rise an hour before sunrise, and Saturn sits about seven degrees to their upper right. For the first two weeks of March we have the opportunity to view the subtle wedge of zodiacal light in the west about 45 minutes after sunset, tapering up toward Mars and the Pleiades. A clear sky free of light pollution is required to view this phenomenon of sunlight reflecting off asteroid and comet dust along the ecliptic.

With astronomy meetings and outreach activities on hold, you can watch the local Sunday Night Astronomy Show at 8 pm, and view archived shows, on YouTube at: 
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCAEHfOWyL-kNH7dBVHK8spg

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.

 

 nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




 

DARK-EYED JUNCO (CISMONTANUS). FEB. 20, 2021. JIM CARROLL

DARK-EYED JUNCO (CISMONTANUS) AND PINE WARBLER. FEB. 20, 2021. JIM CARROLL

SAVANNAH SPARROW. FEB. 24, 2021.   JANE WOOD

SAVANNAH SPARROW. FEB. 24, 2021.   JANE WOOD

SAVANNAH SPARROW. FEB. 24, 2021.   JANE WOOD

DUCK TROUPE. FEB. 25, 2021. SUSAN RICHARDS

MALLARD DUCKS AND AMERICAN BLACK DUCKS. FEB. 25, 2021. GEORGES BRUN

BALD EAGLE (SUBADULT). FEB. 25, 2021. GEORGES BRUN

RED FOX AND PREY. FEB. 25, 2021. GEORGES BRUN


Hydra_Eridanus