Wednesday, 17 August 2022

Aug 17 2022

                  NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

                       August 17, 2022 (Wednesday)

 

 

     To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

**Aldo Dorio was able to photograph a fall edition of a Palm Warbler at Hay Island on Tuesday. (Editor’s note: as many of us are painfully aware, some but not all fall warblers can be problematic but less so with the help of Gilles Belliveau). The near constant flicking tail would have been very helpful to suggest Palm Warbler to ID this sharply dressed fall warbler)

 

 

**Pat Gibbs was able to photograph a Ruby-throated Hummingbird in a plumage we don’t often see. The Sibley guide does illustrate it nicely as a subadult male. Sibley points out this plumage can be seen September to December. Pat’s specimen may be in a bit of a rush but that is pleasantly excused so this photo could be shared!

 

**Tuesday night’s Nature Moncton walk to Dieppe’s Bis Marsh and trail area provided the usual fellowship and pleasant surprises. As seems to be getting the norm, the group tarried a bit late as is shown by Brian Stone’s photo of the sun disappearing behind the Moncton skyline. As the tide was high, only a few expected shorebirds were seen which possibly left a Merlin to cooperatively stay perched, allow it to be patiently photographed, and get everyone present on its day list. The ripe berries of Chokecherry, Pin Cherry, Honeysuckle, and Glossy Buckthorn were prevalent. 

A surprising amount of blooming Alfalfa was noted along the trail making the group wonder if was planted there. 

Many sparrows flitted about in the thick foliage defying identification as not an opportune time for them to be vocalizing. Hundreds of ducks present.

Another pleasant evening in the memory bank!

 

**Brian Stone visited Fundy National Park on Monday and sends some photos of interest. There were many samples of Ghost Pipe Plant (name changing from Indian Pipe) along the Caribou Plains Trail and Brian photographed several. (Editor’s note: the pink blush in some groups of plants in Brian’s photos is normal in some plant groupings as shown by a literature search. It is also interesting to note that some of the plants are now forming seed capsules within their bowed ‘head’ and starting to straighten up as they mature to soon become very dark and expire).

 A young-looking bird at the trail's entrance appeared to be an immature Dark-eyed Junco to Brian but he is awaiting correction if he is wrong with that ID (Editor’s note: Gilles Belliveau suspects he is correct). 

 At a beaver pond close to the start of the trail Brian photographed a mating pair of Band-winged Meadowhawk Dragonflies temporarily perched on a twig. The boardwalk offshoot section of the trail led to a viewing platform overlooking a large bog pond with many large dragonflies patrolling the area and Brian noted a Bullfrog resting at the pond's shallow edge.

 A Thread-waisted Mud Dauber Wasp was examining a white clover flower, and 2 fritillary butterflies were photographed, the Atlantis Fritillary Butterfly and the Silver-bordered Fritillary Butterfly which was quite distant. A pair of Pileated Woodpeckers flew among the trees low to the ground to give nice views but not great photos as the photographer decided to take a tumble, luckily into a large patch of soft moss (face first, of course). 

At the end of the trail a small, young Maritime Garter Snake crossed the path and stopped long enough to be picked up for a better photo op. Other plants noted along the way included Broad-leaved Helleborine and Hobblebush.

At the park Headquarters area, a pair of American Crows perched long enough for a couple of portraits (Editor’s note: note the rounded tail in flight versus the wedge -shaped tail of a Common Raven).

 

**Fred Dube and Nelson Poirier were able to watch and photograph several shorebirds at low tide in the Pictou area recently. All were of the expected species but one photo gave an ID challenge. It is suspected to be a Sanderling but very open to a second opinion as only the one photo to peruse.

 

 

 Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

                                                                                           

 

 

RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD (SUBADULT MALE). AUG 16, 2022.  PAT GIBBS


RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD (SUBADULT MALE). AUG 16, 2022.  PAT GIBBS

SANDERLING JUVENILE (SUSPECTED). AUG 12, 2022. NELSON POIRIER

SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER. AUG 12, 2022. NELSON POIRIER

SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPERS. AUG 12, 2022. NELSON POIRIER

SEMIPALMATED PLOVER AND SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER. AUG 12, 2022. NELSON POIRIER

SEMIPALMATED PLOVER. AUG 12, 2022. NELSON POIRIER 

GREATER YELLOWLEGS. AUG 12, 2022. NELSON POIRIER

LEAST SANDPIPER. AUG 12, 2022. NELSON POIRIER

DARK-EYED JUNCO (YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR). AUG. 15, 2022.. BRIAN STONE

DARK-EYED JUNCO (YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR). AUG. 15, 2022.. BRIAN STONE

MALLARD DUCK. AUG. 16, 2022. BRIAN STONE

MERLIN (JUVENILE SUSPECTED). AUG 16, 2022. DAVID CANNON

MERLIN. AUG. 16, 2022. BRIAN STONE

MERLIN. AUG. 16, 2022. BRIAN STONE

PALM WARBLER. AUG 16, 2022. ALDO DORIO

PILEATED WOODPECKER (MALE). AUG. 15, 2022., BRIAN STONE

GREAT BLUE HERON. AUG. 16, 2022. BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN CROWS. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN CROW. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

ATLANTIS FRITILLARY BUTTERFLY. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

ATLANTIS FRITILLARY BUTTERFLY. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

ATLANTIS FRITILLARY BUTTERFLY. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

SILVER-BORDERED  FRITILLARY BUTTERFLY. AUG. 15, 2022..  BRIAN STONE

THREAD-WAISTED WASP (MUD DAUBER). AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

GHOST PIPE PLANT. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

GHOST PIPE PLANT. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

GHOST PIPE PLANT. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

GHOST PIPE PLANT. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

ALFALFA. AUG. 16, 2022. BRIAN STONE

ALFALFA. AUG. 16, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BROAD-LEAVED HELLEBORINE PLANT. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BROAD-LEAVED HELLEBORINE PLANT. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

HOBBLEBUSH BERRIES. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

HOBBLEBUSH BERRIES. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

PIN CHERRY. AUG. 16, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BAND-WINGED MEADOWHAWK DRAGONFLIES. AUG. 15, 2022., BRIAN STONE

MEADOWHAWK DRAGONFLY. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

MARITIME GARTER SNAKE. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

MARITIME GARTER SNAKE. AUG. 15, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BULLFROG. AUG. 15, 2022., BRIAN STONE

BIS MARSH. AUG. 16, 2022. BRIAN STONE

BIS MARSH. AUG. 16, 2022. BRIAN STONE

NEST BOX. AUG. 16, 2022. BRIAN STONE

MONCTON SUNSET. AUG. 16, 2022. BRIAN STONE

NATURE MONCTON OUTING. AUG. 16, 2022., BRIAN STONE

 
NATURE MONCTON OUTING. AUG. 16, 2022. SELMA ZAIANE

Tuesday, 16 August 2022

Aug 16 2022

       NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

              August 16, 2022 (Tuesday)

 

 

    To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

**Directions and details of tonight’s Nature Moncton outing are repeated at the end of this edition.

 

**Mac Wilmot’s grandson Lewis Stultz is in northern Canada heading for Greenland.  Some scouting was done from a helicopter from the icebreaker Henry Larsen on Saturday, August 13th at Bellot Strait near Fort Ross, Nunavut.  Lewis shares some wonderful photographs from that day.  Lewis reports that the whales in the pictures are a Narwhal and Beluga whale pod blend, which is quite unusual he explains for them to be travelling together. They were certain some were Narwhal as they were able to see the ivory tusks (unicorn style) on at least a few individuals. The darker ones in the photo would be Narwhal or young Belugas. The young Beluga Whale takes several years to take on its all-white pelage.

Lewis was also able to capture a photo of a herd of Muskoxen with the photo showing their impressive horns.

Lewis also got a photo of a Polar Bear on its mission as well as a beautiful skyscape photo from the ship.

The abandoned Hudson’s Bay post would certainly have some stories to tell.

It is very appreciated to be able to share these photos of an area of Canada many of us do not get to see.

 

**Last Monday, Andrew Darcy tagged along with Roger LeBlanc while he did his annual Atlantic Shorebird Survey. They visited 2 different sites, and saw 9 species of shorebirds, including WHITE-RUMPED, LEAST, and SEMI-PALMATED SANDPIPER

At the 2nd site (Riverview Marsh) they got good views of all 3 species flying and foraging together which is very helpful for trying to learn the individual identification features. As they were leaving the marsh, an adult female PEREGRINE FALCON came bombing in and grabbed a sandpiper out of the pond. While they were discussing whether it had actually gotten one, they heard a cacophony of vocalizations from above. As they looked up,  there were 3 young Peregrines performing aerial acrobatics while they attempted to steal the sandpiper from the adult female's talons. Andrew is assuming this was the mother and 3 fledglings from the Assumption building nest box. What an exhilarating interaction to witness!! Andrew will not soon forget those sounds and visuals for some time.  It was quite extraordinary!

Andrew also got a pleasant photo of the Common Wood-nymph Butterfly on a Pin Cherry shrub.

 

 

 

**John Inman photographed what appears to be a juvenile Northern Mockingbird on Monday. John was hoping it would have come farther into the yard for a better look, but it went the other way.

 

**Aldo Dorio photographed another Black-bellied Plover at Hay Island on Monday again showing remnants of breeding plumage.

Aldo also photographed Jewelweed a.k.a. Touch-me-not in bloom which is a hummingbird magnet this time of year.

 

 

**Chris Antle got a photo of a content looking group of Indian Pipe.

This interesting plant has no chlorophyll and does not depend on photosynthesis so is therefore able to grow in the darkest of forests with no requirement for sunlight. It does have a bloom and is pollinated by small bumblebees. Once the bloom is pollinated, the ‘bell’ creates a seed capsule that eventually releases tiny seeds into the wind. It will soon cease to bow its bloom and become straight and darken. That feature is starting to appear in some of the plants in Chris’s photo.

 

**Fred Dube and Nelson Poirier were able to briefly watch a group of Grey Seals going about their mission lounging away a warm day in Pictou Harbour, NS last week. Their moaning chatter to each other was very audible. Due to shallow water the boat could not navigate, it was not possible to get close, but documentary photos were achieved to distinguish features of these large sea mammals.

The head is conspicuously long, broad, and flat with no obvious forehead in comparison to Harbour Seals. Adult males are up to 3 times larger than adult females, with a proportionally larger head and a longer, fleshier snout. Mature males develop a robust neck and chest with prominent folds or wrinkles. Adult males are generally uniform dark grey, brown, or black with scattered light spots and blotches on most of the body. Adult females and juveniles are mostly light silver or grey with dark brown, olive, or black blotches. The ventral coloration, especially of females and juveniles, may be lighter. The documentary photos show these features.

 

 

 

**Mother Nature’s forecast of rain for Wednesday has the regular Nature Moncton evening walk on the run. It is rescheduled for tonight, Tuesday, August 16 with a much more favourable forecast. All details and directions below:

Nature Moncton Walk for Tuesday Night, August 16

Bis Marsh in Dieppe a shorebird mecca

This week’s outing is to Bis Marsh in Dieppe. The sides of the Petitcodiac River estuary from Shepody Bay to roughly Salisbury are occupied by extensive brackish marshes. Here and there natural ponds have formed in these marsh habitats and one of the most extensive is located in Bis Marsh on the Dieppe side of the river. Covering several acres this pond system is quite shallow and because of this is favoured by several species of ducks, water-loving birds and at this time of the year a great diversity of shore birds. Upwards of a dozen species of shorebirds should be findable there and our own Roger Leblanc will be our guide to find and recognize them.

 

How to get there:

From the corner of Main and King St., In Moncton go East on Main St, cross the bridge on Halls Creek into Dieppe and keep going on what becomes Champlain St or route 106. At the third set of lights in Dieppe (2 km from corner of Main and King) turn right on Acadie Avenue (still route 106). Keep going for about 2.3 Km to the parking lot of Wee College on the right at 281 Amirault St. We will meet there at 6:30 PM and proceed from there to a trail head of the linear trail that will bring us to Bis Marsh. The walk will be about 2 km on very level ground so classified as easy going.

 

 

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

                                                                                           

 

BELUGA AND NARWAL WHALE POD. AUG 13, 2022. LEWIS STULTZ



MUSKOXEN HERD. AUG 13, 2022. LEWIS STULTZ

POLAR BEAR. AUG 13, 2022. LEWIS STULTZ

POLAR BEAR. AUG 13, 2022. LEWIS STULTZ

VIEW FROM SHIP NEAR NUNAVUT. AUG 13, 2022. LEWIS STULTZ

ABANDONED HUDSON'S BAY COMPANY POST. AUG 13, 2022. LEWIS STULTZ

PEREGRINE FALCON WITH PREY. AUGUST 4, 2022. ANDREW DARCY

PEREGRINE FALCON (ADULT & JUVENILE). AUGUST 4, 2022. ANDREW DARCY

PEREGRINE FALCON (JUVENILE). AUGUST 4, 2022. ANDREW DARCY

PEREGRINE FALCON (JUVENILE). AUGUST 4, 2022. ANDREW DARCY

NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD. AUG 15, 2022. JOHN INMAN

BLACK-BELLIED PLOVER. AUG 15, 2022. ALDO DORIO

SEMI-PALMATED AND LEAST SANDPIPER IN FLIGHT. AUGUST 4, 2022. ANDREW DARCY

WHITE-RUMPED, LEAST, SEMI-PALMATED SANDPIPER AND SEMPALMATED  PLOVER. AUGUST 4, 2022. ANDREW DARCY

WHITE-RUMPED AND LEAST SANDPIPER AUGUST 4, 2022. ANDREW DARCY


WHITE-RUMPED, SEMIPALMATED, AND LEAST SANDPIPER IN FLIGHT(LEFT TO RIGHT). AUGUST 4, 2022. ANDREW DARCY.

SEMI-PALMATED PLOVER. AUGUST 4, 2022. ANDREW DARCY


COMMON WOOD-NYMPH BUTTERFLY ON PIN CHERRY. AUGUST 4, 2022. ANDREW DARCY

INDIAN PIPE. AUG 14, 2022. CHRIS ANTLE

JEWEL WEED AKA TOUCH-ME-NOT. AUG 15, 2022. ALDO DORIO

GREY SEALS. AUG 12, 2022. NELSON POIRIER

GREY SEALS. AUG 12, 2022. NELSON POIRIER

GREY SEALS. AUG 12, 2022. NELSON POIRIER

GREY SEALS. AUG 12, 2022. NELSON POIRIER