Tuesday, 13 April 2021

April 13 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, April 13, 2021 (Tuesday)

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by Susan Richards susan_richards@rogers.com

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

**Georges Brun noticed Ron Steeves had sent high bird counts from Albert County on April 3.  It surprised Georges to see the numbers of 12,000 and 8,000, yet on April 8, 2021 down by the bend in the Petitcodiac River and over all the marshland, a dozen or so flocks of birds flew over and landed in the waters of the Petitcodiac River.  Georges has not seen these numbers before.  At times they seemed lost but would fly north towards the Champlain traffic circle and use the Veterans highway as their guiding route. At times most of the area was either in fog or snow/rain.  For over an hour they just kept flying in and moving up just before bore arrival. The flocks were BLACK SCOTER [Macreuse noire] WHITE-WINGED SCOTER [Macreuse brune] and SURF SCOTER [Macreuse à front blanc].  Among these were COMMON EIDER [Eider à duvet ] in lesser numbers.  Over the years, Georges would see flocks in better weather, but flying over Chartersville (Dieppe) and heading to northeast.  Perhaps some of the birds stayed over in Chignecto or Shepody Bay before having the ideal conditions to fly north.  It was very difficult to see in grey skies, but it seems to be the conditions birds fly to head north. 

Georges also got a very interesting photo of a WEASEL [BELETTE] along the rocks at the bend.  Georges’ photo shows it just at that pelage transition period, from near-total winter white to dark brown top and white undercarriage of summer.


**Edmund Redfield has checked on the Smelt [ÉPERLAN] run up the Petitcodiac River to find a very plentiful run, in progress.  This is no doubt why the occasional HARBOUR PORPOISE [Marsouin commun] has been seen in the river in the bend area.  This is also good news for ATLANTIC SALMON [Saumon atlantique] that had been placed in the Pollett and Little Rivers that have spawned and now on their way out to the Bay of Fundy to replenish with Smelt prey to fuel their journey with a quick start.  Flocks of gulls are also impressed and may well be the reason why many scoters were observed in the river.

 

**Louise Nichols was walking in the Jolicure area on Sunday afternoon and as she was walking down a trail to Big Jolicure Lake she heard a very loud, kind of cackling noise.  For a moment she did not know what it was.  She thought birds at first maybe ducks as she could hear them a long way off and then she realized, frogs.  There was a wet area alongside the trail and the WOOD FROG [Grenouille des bois] were in a vocalizing frenzy.  She could not see them as they must have been back in the vegetation, but Louise took a short video for the sound.  Listen to the action at the attached link:

https://www.dropbox.com/s/i6njl9n9iowuvs3/DSCN6804.MOV?dl=0

 

 

**Lois Budd was pleased to have a FOX SPARROW [Bruant fauve] come to her Salisbury area feeder on Monday to join the large number of DARK-EYED JUNCO [Junco ardoise] and other Sparrows.  The Fox Sparrow is always a special visitor as it is this short window that we get to see them in spring as they stop to fuel up on their way to breed to the north of us.  We will see some in the fall as well as they return south but not as frequently as we do in the spring.

**Jane Leblanc had 2 avian visitors to her St. Martins’ yard on Monday she does not often get.   A WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH [Sittelle à poitrine blanche] visited, being an uncommon visitor with the RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH [Sittelle à poitrine rousse] very common.  A male YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER [Pic maculé] also dropped by which Jane comments is only the third time that they have seen one in their yard over the years.  She was only able to get a quick documentary photo as it did not stay long.

Jane also got a photo of a SNOWSHOE HARE [Lièvre d'Amérique] in their driveway.  It was in the process of changing its pelage to summer brown.  Jane comments “It happens to be the bright sun which made the photo more variable”.

 

**Mac Wilmot got a nice photo of a SONG SPARROW [Bruant chanteur] that is being welcomed back to New Brunswick in numbers the past week.  This species can show variable plumage to make for second looks.

 

**Aldo Dorio photographed a pair of BLACK SCOTER off Hay Island on Sunday.  The scoters seem to be showing up in many spots we have not been used to seeing them during their migration north to breed.  Hopefully, it is an indication that their numbers are good.


**While Brian Stone was on his back deck on Monday in the cool temperatures a male YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER [Paruline à croupion jaune] dropped by to say hello and offer some nice photo ops.  Brian comments “it asked when the spring weather would arrive”?  Note the white throat, split white eye ring, and yellow rump patch that are field marks of this traditionally early warbler arrival.


**Nature Moncton is hosting a virtual presentation on bat-house construction for the May meeting.  In preparing for that presentation, Karen Vanderwolf provided suggestions on bat housing that she is presently doing research on.  Fred Richards constructed 4 as trial balloons.  They turned out to be very time-consuming to construct and materials cost $50 each so only made 4 for now.  One went up on Sunday at our Miramichi camp and is pictured up in position from front and under view.  With cave bats in such low numbers after the White-Nose Syndrome hit confidence of the nest box being occupied is low but more possible if the houses are up.  Also, Big Brown Bats [Grosse chauve-souris brune] that do not use caves to hibernate, are up in numbers in New Brunswick, and they may be a possibility.

I also noted on the two warm sunny days recently there seemed to be some action in the very early emerging MASON BEE houses that are up.  I have attached a photo that looks like a few nest holes have occupants waiting for their first warmer day to emerge.

 

**I made another run to check 7 more swallow houses on Monday and was pleased to see 6 had been occupied by TREE SWALLOWS and the 7th was occupied by a FLYING SQUIRREL [Grand polatouche].  This would appear to be a spring nest which will soon have young.  It went in and out of the box a few times then climbed the utility pole and stayed there quiet for a few minutes to give chance for a photo op, and then it glided to some nearby conifer trees.  I am not sure if the box had been swallow-occupied last summer but was suspicious, as in the quick photo I can see the swallow nest remnants at the bottom with the Flying Squirrel nest which was constructed of wood fibers and quite bulky above it.  A pleasant surprise for sure.

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

 


SCOTERS. APR 8, 2021.  GEORGES BRUN

SCOTERS. APR 8, 2021.  GEORGES BRUN

BLACK SCOTER (PAIR).APRIL 12, 2021. ALDO DORIO

FOX SPARROW. APRIL 12, 2021.  LOIS BUDD

FOX SPARROW. APRIL 12, 2021.  LOIS BUDD

SONG SPARROW. APRIL 12, 2021.  MAC WILMOT

SONG SPARROW. APRIL 12, 2021.  MAC WILMOT

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER. APRIL 12, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER. APRIL 12, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

WHITE BREATED NUTHATCH. APR. 12, 2021. JANE LEBLANC

YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER. APR. 12, 2021. JANE LEBLANC

WEASEL. APR 7, 2021.  GEORGES BRUN

WEASEL. APR 7, 2021.  GEORGES BRUN

SNOWSHOE HARE. APR. 12, 2021. JANE LEBLANC

FLYING SQUIRREL. APRIL 12, 2021. NELSON POIRIER 

FLYING SQUIRREL. APRIL 12, 2021. NELSON POIRIER 

FLYING SQUIRREL NEST. APRIL 12, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

FLYING SQUIRREL NEST. APRIL 12, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

BAT HOUSE. APRIL 12, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

BAT HOUSE (UNDER VIEW). APRIL 12, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

MASON BEE HOUSE. APRIL 12, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

 

Monday, 12 April 2021

April 12 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, April, 12, 2021 (Monday)

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by Susan Richards susan_richards@rogers.com

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

**While birding around Memramcook on Saturday, Marco Vachon found out that 2 BEAVER [Castor] had set up territory at the Reid McManus Nature Reserve and was able to get some good photos of the activity.  On Sunday morning it was a MINK [Vison d'Amerique] that greeted Marco around Memramcook Lake.  Nice to see these furry animals.  These sites have been very kind to naturalist’s observations the past week.

 

**Lois Budd had a near fallout of DARK-EYED JUNCO [Junco ardoisé] on Sunday afternoon.  She counted 50 of them at the front and side of her house and the ones bobbing and scratching over by a dead Elm tree, she didn’t get to count but perhaps another 30 or so.  A lot of scratching going on and millet disappearing. She also has a pair of EASTERN PHOEBE [Moucherolle phébi] starting to nest in her old barn and EVENING GROSBEAK [Gros-bec errant] and COMMON REDPOLL [Sizerin flammé] are still present in significant numbers.

 

**In follow up to the discussion yesterday on Avian Keratin Disorder, Frank Branch had a EUROPEAN STARLING [Étourneau sansonnet] appear in his Paquetville yard with this disorder in April of 2015 with photos attached.

 

**Shani Jones was very pleased to have a male NORTHERN CARDINAL [Cardinal rouge] singing in her Moncton yard on April 9th.  Shani comments she has been waiting for years for this visit.  The appearance of more Northern Cardinals in a much wider range of New Brunswick this season has been a real treat and hope there is lots of successful housekeeping.

 

**Daryl Doucette’s female EASTERN TOWHEE [Tohi à flancs roux] continues to be a regular faithful patron to his Moncton feeder yard and posed for a photo on Sunday.

 

**Paula Lansdale in Alma also had her first of the year Eastern Phoebe arrive right to her deck and enjoyed feeding on Cluster Flies near the roof area where this fly often overwinters and starts appearing now to the delight of fly connoisseurs.  Sometimes NORTHERN SHRIKE [Pie-grièche grise] find them very attractive as well.

 

**Jamie and Karen Burris were checking and cleaning swallow nest boxes on Sunday.  They had 3 nest boxes set up; one was taken by wasps; one was empty and another had been occupied and the old nest cleaned out.  They were a bit surprised only one was successfully occupied as they saw TREE SWALLOW [Hirondelle bicolore] checking all 3 boxes last season.  They were pleased just as they were leaving the site on Sunday to see 4 Tree Swallows circling over them.  Great to hear lots of reports of Tree Swallows arriving in good numbers.

 

**Fishing buoys hanging in a yard may provide more avian interest than we stop to realize. Art Bateman has been noting a pair of BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADDEES appear to be actively excavating a nest cavity chipping away at pieces and removing them to create a cavity of their liking. Art was not able to capture a sharp photo with them moving in and out so robustly. This is not the first-time fishing buoys have been reported of getting use by birds as Brian Coyle had a woodpecker use an excavated hole in one as a night perch all winter.

I wonder if it would be an interesting idea to hang one in our yards and excavate some man-made holes in them to encourage birds to use them as one more tool to attract birds to our yards.

 

**The TREE SWALLOWS and EASTERN PHOEBES are moving in fast and suddenly from all the reports the last few days. Dave Christie reports he saw 3 Tree Swallows foraging over Lars Larsen Marsh in Harvey on Sunday and an Eastern Phoebe was enjoying flycatching around his home.

 

 

**Brian Stone went through the Memramcook area once again on Sunday as the sunny early light turned to a dull, misty, windy afternoon. He checked out the lagoon at the Reid McManus Nature Reserve site first but only found a busy MUSKRAT there near the viewing blind. He then went to the Arthur St. lagoon and spent an hour watching for any interesting arrivals. Nothing rare showed up while he was there but he was happy to see 4 NORTERN PINTAILS enjoying the cold waters and an active NORTHERN SHRIKE patrolling the length of the lagoon fence. There were 30+ RING-NECKED DUCKS friskily pursuing single females (Editor’s note: an excellent photo of a pair to show the gender plumages) but only a few BLACK SCOTER were still there. A wave of fear spread through the lagoon population as an immature BALD EAGLE made a low flyover of the area but it didn't hang around for long. The Memramcook River behind the lagoon was crowded with Canada Geese. While heading back home along the Old Shediac Rd. he was lucky to spot a male AMERICAN KESTREL (another great photo) perched

 

 **All the nest box cleaning discussion got me to start checking mine in Miramichi on Sunday.  I checked 5 swallow boxes and 1 AMERICAN KESTREL [Crécerelle d’Amérique] box.  All had been occupied.  They were all mounted on utility poles near an open field.  At the Kestrel site I heard an American Kestrel vocalizing loudly but could not locate it but, it did seem close.  There are approximately 10 more to get to tomorrow and hoping we’ll have a similar level of activity as last season.  Permethrin and Diatomaceous Earth were in all the boxes to control fleas which seemed to work as found none among the nesting material.

 

 nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

 


RING-NECKED DUCKS (PAIR). APRIL 11, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

RING-NECKED DUCKS (PAIR). APRIL 11, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

NORTHERN PINTAIL DUCKS (PAIR). APRIL 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN KESTREL (MALE). APRIL 11, 2021. BRIAN STONE

EASTERN TOWHEE (FEMALE). APRIL 11, 2021. DARYL DOUCETTE

BALD EAGLE. (IMMATURE) APRIL 11, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

EUROPEAN STARLING (AVIAN KERATIN DISORDER). APRIL 24, 2015. FRANK BRANCH

EUROPEAN STARLING (AVIAN KERATIN DISORDER). APRIL 24, 2015. FRANK BRANCH

NORTHERN SHRIKE. APRIL 11, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

TURKEY VULTURE. APRIL 11, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

TURKEY VULTURE. APRIL 11, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE EXCAVATING BUOY. APRIL 11, 2021. ART BATEMAN




BEAVER. APRIL 10, 2021.  MARCO VACHON

BEAVER. APRIL 10, 2021.  MARCO VACHON

BEAVER. APRIL 10, 2021.  MARCO VACHON

MINK. APRIL 11, 2021, MARCO VACHON

MUSKRAT. APRIL 11, 2021.. BRIAN STONE



 

Sunday, 11 April 2021

April 11 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, April 11, 2021 (Sunday)

 

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 ** There are reports of TREE SWALLOWS [Hirondelle bicolore] already arriving and checking the real estate.  It is definitely time to get all those last year’s occupied nest boxes cleaned out and ready for them to be checked out.  Susan Richards sends a photo of our chief carpenter Fred Richards getting his cleaned out on Saturday.  Fred has built approximately 400 nest boxes that have fledged many successful clutches of mostly Tree Swallows, but also Chickadees, Eastern Bluebirds and some Flying Squirrels.

 

** Ron Steeves again made a pilgrimage to Cape Enrage on Saturday.  Very little sea duck movement at Cape Enrage on Saturday morning until about 10:00.  Only 12 LONG-TAILED DUCKS [Harelde kakawi], one flock of 90 EIDER [Eider] and 11 SCOTERS [Macreuse].  Ron comments he couldn’t take the slow pace any longer, so went up to the New Horton Church until 3:30 PM where there was just enough action to keep one’s interest although at a low level.  Birds thought to be migrating were 5 SHARP-SHINNED HAWKS [Épervier brun], 3 RED-TAILED HAWKS [Buse à queue rousse], 2 NORTHERN HARRIERS [Busard Saint-Martin], 2 AMERICAN KESTRELS [Crécerelle d'Amérique], 1 NORTHERN GOSHAWK [Autour des palombes] and 3 unidentified raptors, one of which he suspected was an OSPREY [Balbuzard pêcheur].  Other raptors seen that were presumed not to be migrating were 9 TURKEY VULTURES [Urubu à tête rouge], one pair of NORTHERN HARRIERS [Busard Saint-Martin], an AMERICAN KESTREL [Crécerelle d'Amérique] pair and several BALD EAGLES [Pygargue à tête blanche].  There was a large migration of gulls again on Saturday, estimating 200+.  A large movement of songbirds early, largely sparrows, DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoisé] and AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique].  He counted 88 robins on the church lawn and yard.  They and the SONG SPARROWS [Bruant chanteur] were feasting on the thousands of Cluster Flies that seemed to inhabit the attic of the church.  The warm weather yesterday activated the proper conditions for this feast.  Also sitting up to the table was an EASTERN PHOEBE [Moucherolle phébi] along with a pair of TREE SWALLOWS [Hirondelle bicolore].

 

** Andrew Olive shares a few photos from the last few days, taken around Restigouche county.  The SURF SCOTERS [Macreuse à front blanc] were photographed at Eel River Bar on Friday.  The males were in full display not far offshore.  The female seemed to be overwhelmed and made several dives to rid herself of the aggressive males for a bit of a break, but every time she would dive, the males would follow suit.  The SNOW GEESE [Oie des neiges] just arrived to the shores of the Restigouche.  Andrew zoomed in from a long distance from the Altholville water tower, looking over to the booms on the Quebec side of the Restigouche.  Photos of the COLTSFOOT and MOURNING CLOAK BUTTERFLY [Morio] were also taken Saturday morning by the Altholville Water Tower, more locally known as the “butte sugar” which translates as “sugar mound.”  A HOARY REDPOLL [Sizerin blanchâtre] was one of two photographed in Andrew’s backyard on Friday.

 

** Grant Ramsay and Magda Kuhn were riding through Irishtown Park Saturday afternoon, and from the bridge, they were surprised to spot several LONG-TAILED DUCKS [Harelde kakawi], a few SCOTERS [Macreuse], a pair of HOODED MERGANSERS [Harle couronné] and a male COMMON EIDER [Eider à duvet] – an interesting collection for this time of year for the Irishtown Nature Park.  Interesting how all these species are showing up at lagoons and smaller bodies of water at the moment, presumably making resting/refueling stops.

 

** Paula Lansdale in Alma reports that she had two NORTHERN FLICKERS [Pic flamboyant] challenging each other over her suet feeder.  The nice surprise of the day was the arrival of a TREE SWALLOW [Hirondelle bicolore] that immediately started to check out a nest box that was erected on Friday.  Paula also reports her brother in Alma has had a pair of Northern Cardinals at his feeder for the past few months, surely looking good for those house-keeping possibilities.

 

** Doreen Rossiter in Alma has had one or two NORTHERN FLICKERS [Pic flamboyant] pop by each day recently.  However, Saturday was a near fallout.  Doreen comments they seemed to be every where and she couldn’t hazard a guess at the real number.  Doreen also had two female and two male BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS [Vacher à tête brune] arrive on Saturday as well as a male NORTHERN CARDINAL and an EASTERN PHOEBE [Moucherolle phébi].

 

** Bob and Sharon Blake had their resident EASTERN PHOEBE [Moucherolle phébi] return to their Second North River yard on Saturday.  This is normally the first flycatcher to arrive.  Their flicking tail habit is a quick clue to potential identification as well as the males vocalizing their name.

 

** A few PURPLE FINCH [Roselin pourpré] do overwinter with us; most move south but not far.  They usually return in mass at this time of year.  Susan Richards had her first male arrive to her Taylor Village feeders on Sunday morning.

 

** Jim Johnson reports seeing his first AMERICAN KESTREL [Crécerelle d'Amérique] of the year on Saturday morning in a field behind his Scotch Settlement home.  He has put up a kestrel nest box to see if the real estate will interest them.  Jim has lots of boxes up for TREE SWALLOWS [Hirondelle bicolore] and is expecting the early scouts soon.

 

**Georges Brun spotted a HARBOUR PORPOISE from the Bend of the Petitcodiac to the Moncton Public Wharf Saturday morning. It came upriver 15 minutes after bore arrival. It swam in a circle so would assume must have been on a school of fish, probably smelts.

 

**Aldo Dorio photographed a NORTERN SHRIKE at Hay Island on Sunday morning with this species on its favoured perch, atop a conifer tree, scouting the area. This is the short time window we can expect to hear this species vocalize before their journey back north to breed. Take a moment to refamiliarize yourself with its calls to recognize it which will happen often before you see it.

 

 

** Fred and Lynn Dube have had a RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH [Sittelle à poitrine rousse] coming to their Lower Coverdale feeder yard for a time.  It has a very long bill anomaly termed Avian Keratin Disorder.  There is a group that does research on this anomaly in birds and this will be forwarded to them.  Fred got some photos that seem to suggest it is doing fine.

 

** Brian Stone visited his sister in Upham on Saturday and got some photos of the DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoisé] feeding in her yard and also one leftover COMMON REDPOLL [Sizerin flammé].  At the edge of her deck, the COLTSFOOT were blooming in small numbers.  On his way home, he stopped in at the Hampton lagoons and got photos of several recent arrivals.  There were two dozen NORTHERN SHOVELERS [Canard souchet], several pairs of BUFFLEHEADS [Petit Garrot] and SCAUP [Fuligule], many MALLARDS [Canard colvert] and approximately 6 WOOD DUCKS [Canard branchu] and one male RUDDY DUCK [Érismature rousse].  A few COMMON GOLDENEYE [Garrot à oeil d'or] were too far out for good photos.  The now thawed lagoons and small bodies of water are surely coming alive with life.

 

** I have been watching an INFANT MOTH moving around our camp for a few days now and have been frustrated it would not settle down for a momentary look with binoculars or even a photo.  Saturday morning it did stop very briefly for that photo op, then it was off on its fast erratic flight.

 

** Thinking of how nature can inspire us in many ways, the fossil cliffs at Joggins have brought about beautiful musical pieces and Janet Hammock has made them available in a broadcast today at 1:00 PM.  I am going to attach Janet Hammock’s message below where it can be heard as well as be live-streamed:

 

From: Janet Hammock <jhammock@mta.ca>
Subject: Fly me this Sunday

Jeff Martin is my guest today Sunday, April 11th, on Fly Me To The Moon. A fine composer, Jeff collected some of his most exciting sounds at the Joggins Fossil Cliffs while he was composer-in- residence there a few years ago and used them as the sound materials in one of his beautiful compositions, part of which you’ll hear on the show. Jeff, his wife, Creek, and their baby Edwin make their home in Sackville, and I am always thrilled to celebrate the creative work of a local artist! This was originally broadcast in 2017 and this Sunday is featured as one of “...the best of...” series. There is a short new introduction featuring the delightful voices of two newcomers to the world of music...you will not want to miss it! 1:00 Atlantic time on 107.9fm Tantramar Community Radio and live streamed on cftafm.com

 

Dr. Janet Hammock 

Professor Emeritus of Music at Mount Allison University

Sackville, NB, E4L3W2

Jhammock@mta.ca

 

 

 

 nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




SURF SCOTERS. APRIL 9, 2021.  ANDREW OLIVE

SURF SCOTERS. APRIL 9, 2021.  ANDREW OLIVE

SNOW GEESE. APRIL 9, 2021.  ANDREW OLIVE

WOOD DUCKS (MALE AND FEMALE) AND A MALE MALLARD DUCK. APRIL 10, 2021. BRIAN STONE

RUDDY DUCK (MALE). APRIL 10, 2021. BRIAN STONE

NORTHERN SHOVELERS (PAIR). APRIL 10, 2021. BRIAN STONE

LESSER SCAUP. APRIL 10, 2021. BRIAN STONE

LONG-TAILED DUCK (MALE). APRIL 10, 2021. GRANT RAMSAY

BUFFLHEAD DUCK (MALE). APRIL 10, 2021. BRIAN STONE

BLACK SCOTER (MALE) AND HOODED MERGANSER PAIR). APRIL 10, 2021. GRANT RAMSAY

COMMON EIDER. APRIL 10, 2021. GRANT RAMSAY

COMMON EIDER. APRIL 10, 2021. GRANT RAMSAY

HOARY REDPOLL. APRIL 10, 2021.  ANDREW OLIVE

HOARY REDPOLL. APRIL 10, 2021.  ANDREW OLIVE

COMMON REDPOLL. APRIL 10, 2021. BRIAN STONE

DARK-EYED JUNCO. APRIL 10, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

PURPLE FINCH (MALE). APRIL 10, 2021. SUSAN RICHARDS

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH (BILL ANOMALY). APRIL 10, 2021.  FRED DUBE.

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH (BILL ANOMALY). APRIL 10, 2021.  FRED DUBE

NORTHERN SHRIKE. APRIL 11, 2021.  ALDO DORIO

NORTHERN SHRIKE. APRIL 11, 2021.  ALDO DORIO




HARBOUR PORPOISE. APR 10, 2021.  GEORGES BRUN

HARBOUR PORPOISE. APR 10, 2021.  GEORGES BRUN



COLTSFOOT. APRIL 10, 2021. BRIAN STONE

COLTSFOOT. APRIL 10, 2021. ANDREW OLIVE

MOURNING CLOAK BUTTERFLY. APRIL 10, 2021. ANDREW OLIVE

MOURNING CLOAK BUTTERFLY. APRIL 10, 2021. ANDREW OLIVE

INFANT MOTH. APRIL 10, 2021.  NELSON POIRIER

INFANT MOTH. APRIL 10, 2021.  NELSON POIRIER

NEST BOX CLEAN OUT TIME. APRIL 10, 2021. SUSAN RICHARDS