Wednesday, 28 July 2021

July 28 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, July 28, 2021 (Wednesday)  

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 

**Fred Richards reports the Tuesday night group met for a look and walk at Johnson’s Mills.  There were only a few sandpipers (about 200 in the largest group) which seems like there should have been more by this time.   They observed a PEREGRINE FALCON take a small bird on the mud flats and stop on a rock to dine before a Bald Eagle made it nervous and it moved on.  They then walked down the old road and returned on the new road. They observed a porcupine or two and some birds were voicing their presence but were hesitant with showing themselves. They heard some crossbills and saw a Black- Throated Green Warbler. Lots of flora in prime foliage most likely due to the abundant rainfall this summer.  It was a most enjoyable walk. 

 

 

** Aldo Dorio photographed a BLACK SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLY at Hay Island on Tuesday. It appears quite fresh except for one of the long tails being damaged. The extra yellow cell (arrow) shows well to help eliminate the Short-tailed Swallowtail Butterfly along with the longer tail and the nearby yellow spot shorter than the tail. Aldo also photographed a suspected immature PALM WARBLER.

ALDO did have to leave his home on Wednesday morning to look out his window for a nice photo of a CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER posing still showing natal down, its voyage into the outside world just getting underway.

 

 

** Brian Stone checked out the Hampton lagoons on Tuesday while visiting family at Upham. He was hoping to get some good shots of the GREEN HERON frequenting the pond at the front of the lagoons but had to be satisfied with a few long distant shots and one taken through a thick stand of cattails that needed heroic adjusting to show any detail. He plans on trying again before he leaves for home later in the week. While there he managed to photograph a TURKEY VULTURE flying overhead, a male NORTHERN CARDINAL calling loudly and continuously from the top of a tall spruce tree, a GREAT BLUE HERON, a female AMERICAN REDSTART, and an AMERICAN LADY BUTTERFLY nectaring. A few more images from the area will likely follow over the next few days.

 

** The strikingly marked GREAT TIGER MOTH posed for images at my moth light on Monday night. It has been cool for visiting moths in recent nights so this mid to large sized brightly marked orange, black and red moth added some welcome colour. Even the body, which the photo covers, is bright red. It cooperated slightly to flash the bold, black-spotted orange underwing.

I have had an AMERICAN KESTREL nest box erected for several years adjacent some open fields near our Miramichi camp. It has been occupied every year but find it odd that I have yet to even seen a kestrel at any other site in the area. The occupants have always been very wary, and Mama allowed a distant photo as she surveyed her territory recently. Traffic can pass by seemingly unnoticed, but the moment you slow down or stop, they move a distance away. No nestlings have appeared yet, but the box has never showed any nestlings poking out until August even thought they seem to arrive early and get an early start.

 

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




GREEN HERON. JULY 27, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

GREEN HERON. JULY 27, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

TURKEY VULTURE. JULY 27, 2021. BRIAN STONE

NORTHERN CARDINAL (MALE). JULY 27, 2021. BRIAN STONE

CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER (FLEDGLING). JULY 28, 2021. ALDO DORIO

PALM WARBLER (SUSPECTED). JULY 27, 2021.  ALDO DORIO

PALM WARBLER (SUSPECTED). JULY 27, 2021.  ALDO DORIO

AMERICAN REDSTART (FEMALE). JULY 27, 2021. BRIAN STONE

GREAT BLUE HERON. JULY 27, 2021. BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN KESTREL. JULY 26. 2021. NELSON POIRIER

AMERICAN LADY BUTTERFLY. JULY 27, 2021. BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN LADY BUTTERFLY. JULY 27, 2021. BRIAN STONE

BLACK SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLY. JULY 27, 2021. ALDO DORIO

GREAT TIGER MOTH. JULY 26. 2021. NELSON POIRIER

GREAT TIGER MOTH. JULY 26. 2021. NELSON POIRIER

 

Tuesday, 27 July 2021

July 27 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, July 27, 2021 (Tuesday)

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by Fred Richards fredrichards@rogers.com

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

Jim Carrol shares photo he took on July 13th for reference purposes of the EASTERN MEADOWLARKS in Coates Mills.

Yesterday Jim received an Email from Canadian Wildlife Services Wildlife Biologist Kathy St-Laurent regarding the Ste Marie de Kent Eastern Meadowlarks as follows that is of interest:

 

Quoting Kathy "I went to visit the site on Friday but didn’t see or hear the birds. I didn’t go at a very ideal time though, so I decided to go back again this morning. Good thing I did! I saw the family group with at least 2 fledged young (possibly 3). They were in the horse pasture on the other side of the road and then flew off toward the river. All the fields are still uncut. I spoke with the fellow from #671 and he indicated the fields are owned by various people. He, himself, doesn’t get his hay cut until August.

 Great to be able to report the young have successfully fledged."

Thanks for that sharing Jim and Kathy. 

 

 

 

**Adam Campbell from Ducks Unlimited gave Louise Nichols Wild Rice seed to plant in her Aulac yard pond.  Ducks Unlimited do this with their impoundments as well to provide forage for waterfowl.  Louise had kind of assumed the attempt had failed as she didn’t notice anything last summer but this summer, she kept noticing all this new growth in various places and then realized it was indeed what she had planted, the seed that Adam had given her, and took a closer look.  She sent photos to Adam and he confirmed it was indeed Wild Rice.  He also warned the MUSKRATS will take it but although they definitely had Muskrats last season, she has not seen any around the pond this summer.  So, hoping the rice attracts more ducks as well.

Wild rice is actually not a rice but a grass with grains. The female grains are what sets above water lever and is harvested by waterfowl as well as humans. The grains ripen in order so several harvests are indicated. The grain can be hard to harvest from the thick shell for humans but is delicious.


**There seems to be a lot of comments about the number of CROWS about this year.  Sterling Marsh reports he was loudly serenaded by a trio of Crows that lacked peaceful harmony but sure made up for it in volume.

 

Lisa Morris rescued an AMERICAN TOAD from a near accidental encounter with her lawn mower.  It looks like all went well.  Lisa also encountered a deceased FLOUNDER, on the beach¸ to show the very cryptic topside with the completely white undercarriage.

 

**Aldo Dorio got a photograph of an adult SEMIPALMATED PLOVER at Hay Island on Monday.  The shorebirds can be expected to appear in large numbers son.

 

**Fred Richards photographed what I suspect is the CHICKEN MUSHROOM but not completely confident.  If correct it is considered a choice edible when young and not tough.  They appear on stumps, trunks and logs of deciduous and coniferous trees anytime from May to November anytime moisture is prevalent.

 

**Brian Stone got a nice photo of a SHARP-SHINNED HAWK in flight showing the transverse-streaked belly of the adult, the square tail tip, some red on the eye (to suggest approaching adult), and the wider white tail bands and dark tail bands.

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

 

EASTERN MEADOWLARK. JULY 13, 2021. JIM CARROLL

SEMI-PALMATED PLOVER. JULY 26, 2021. ALDO DORIO

SHARP-SHINNED HAWK. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN KESTREL. JULY 26, 2021. ALDO DORIO

AMERICAN KESTREL AT NEST SITE. JULY 26, 2021. ALDO DORIO

AMERICAN CROWS. JULY 26, 2021. STERLING MARSH


AMERICAN TOAD. JULY 26, 2021.  LISA MORRIS

AMERICAN TOAD. JULY 26, 2021.  LISA MORRIS

CHICKEN MUSHROOM (SUSPECTED). JULY 26, 2021.  FRED RICHARDS

CHICKEN MUSHROOM (SUSPECTED). JULY 26, 2021.  FRED RICHARDS

FLOUNDER. JULY 26, 2021.  LISA MORRIS

FLOUNDER. JULY 26, 2021.  LISA MORRIS

WILD RICE. JULY 25, 2021. LOUISE NICHOLS

WILD RICE. JULY 25, 2021. LOUISE NICHOLS

WILD RICE. JULY 25, 2021. LOUISE NICHOLS

 

Monday, 26 July 2021

July 26 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, July 26, 2021 (Monday)

To respond by email, please address your message to the information line editor, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by Fred Richards fredrichards@rogers.com

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 

**Tomorrow night’s Tuesday outing repeated at the end of this edition and up front tomorrow morning.


**Jane Leblanc got a nice photo of an AMERICAN LADY butterfly in her St. Martins milkweed patch on Saturday.  The photo shows the more squared off forewing tip and the orange bar in the forewing apex. The PAINTED LADY would have less squared off forewing tip and the bar near the forewing apex would be white for a few quick identity features between our two lady butterflies along with other features.  Jane also had four MONARCH BUTTERFLIES and one WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY in her MILKWEED patch on Saturday. Milkweed and SPREADING DOGBANE are two very popular butterfly targets at the moment.


**Suzanne Rousseau in Sussex is enjoying the results of planting SWAMP MILKWEED in her yard.  Suzanne sends a photo of several very plump MONARCH BUTTERFLY CATERPILLAR passing out sizeable chunks of frass (poop) suggesting that entering the pupa chrysalis stage may not be far away.  Suzanne has had four chrysalides form.  One emergent adult flew off on July 17.

 

** Chris Antle photographed the WHITE-SPOTTED SAWYER BEETLE. This is a common wood boring beetle in New Brunswick, easily recognized by its white spot at the base of the wings. Chris’s example is probably a male as the antennae are longer than the body.  Adults favour pine and spruce. The females chew small niches into dead and dying trees. Their lifecycle ranges from 1 to 4 years. They do like burn over areas, attracted to the dead and dying trees. The larvae can actually be heard chewing from the outside of an affected tree. The chewing sound is quite audible if you stay quiet and listen. I recall one time, tenting in a forest campground, and a neighbour said in the morning that he hardly got any sleep the night from hearing some chewing sounds coming from a nearby tree!

 

** Many mushrooms are enjoying the recent New Brunswick weather. Dale Gaskin reports he gathered 4 1/2 pounds of CHANTERELLE MUSHROOMS in an area approximately 12 by 12 feet, having never seen them so abundant and in one spot. Some have already hit the haute cuisine platter which Dale describes as an incredible flavour. 

Dale also reports he has a family of fledged EASTERN BLUEBIRDS and a family of BARN SWALLOWS yet to fledge.

 

 

** Brian Stone sent in some photos from a walk behind Crandall University on Friday, July 23rd. He got some interesting wasps including a CARROT WASP in flight (Editors Note: this is a small wasp which many of us are unfamiliar with but BugGuide confirmed it), and a PAPER WASP (Editors Note: this wasp constructs open-celled umbrella shaped nests). Brian got some images of flies, which were of the TAWNY-TAILED BEE FLY, a TACHINID FLY and also a TRI-COLOURED BUMBLEBEE, a SONG SPARROW, a CLOUDED SULPHUR BUTTERFLY (Editors Note: nicely showing the double ring on the hind wing and three faint spots) and CLINTONIA BERRIES. Note in the fly photos how the pollen grains are sticking to them to make them effective pollinators.

 

** On Saturday July 24th, Brian went to Coates Mills to look for the EASTERN MEADOWLARKS that had been there over the last weeks. He waited about 1 ½ hour before just 1 of the 5 showed up briefly, for just minutes, too far away for a nice photo. Assuming 3 of them are fledglings, he assumed the one he got the photo of to be one of them. Brian then went to the Highland Park in Salisbury on the way home and got photos of a family of AMERICAN WIGEONS and a few of the AMERICAN COOTS still present. There were several WOOD DUCKS in the pond. Many of the Goldenrod plants had large GOLDENROD GALLS on them which are produced by the GOLDENRED GALL FLY laying eggs on goldenrod species with the larvae creating the protective gall structure.

 

** I don’t recall a butterfly ever coming to the hummingbird feeders for me, but probably others have. We had a FRITILLARY BUTTERFLY, one of the larger ones, come to a hummingbird feeder and appear to take nectar for almost two minutes, a missed photo op for sure.

 

****This week’s Tuesday night Nature Moncton outing will be walking at Johnsons Mills.  Meet at the Interpretative Center parking lot at 6:30 PM.  We will look for birds at the center and then take a walk along the road or drive to the other viewing site to see what we can see.  The tide will be on the way out so it might be a good idea to come early to see the sandpipers. Leader will be Fred Richards.

 

 nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

 

EASTERN MEADOWLARK. JULY 23, 2021..  BRIAN STONE

EASTERN MEADOWLARK. JULY 23, 2021..  BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN COOT. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE




AMERICAN WIGEON AND DUCKLINGS. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE 

AMERICAN WIGEON AND DUCKLINGS. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE 

SONG SPARROW. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

WOOD DUCK. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN LADY BUTTERFLY. JULY 24, 2021. JANE LeBLANC

CLOUDED SULPHUR BUTTERFLY. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

SWAMP MILKWEED PATCH. JULY 25, 2021, SUZANNE ROUSSEAU

MONARCH BUTTERFLY CATERPILLARS. JULY 25, 2021. SUZANNE ROUSSEAU

MONARCH BUTTERFLY CATERPILLAR (JUST HATCHED). JULY 25, 2021, SUZANNE ROUSSEAU

MONARCH BUTTERFLY EGG, JULY 25, 2021, SUZANNE ROUSSEAU

WHITE-SPOTTED SAWYER BEETLE. JULY 25, 2021. CHRIS ANTLE

TRI-COLOURED BUMBLEBEE. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

CARROT WASP. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

CARROT WASP. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

CARROT WASP. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

PAPER WASP. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

TACHINID FLY. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

TAWNY-TAILED BEE FLY. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

TAWNY-TAILED BEE FLY. JULY 23, 2021., BRIAN STONE


 

TAWNY-TAILED BEE FLY. JULY 23, 2021., BRIAN STONE

GOLDENROD GALL. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

BITTER BOLETE MUSHROOM. JULY 23, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

BITTER BOLETE MUSHROOM. JULY 23, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

CLINTONIA BERRIES. JULY 23, 2021. BRIAN STONE

FLY AGARIC MUSHROOM. JULY 23, 2021., BRIAN STONE

FLY AGARIC MUSHROOM. JULY 23, 2021., BRIAN STONE