Sunday, 28 January 2018

Jan 28 2018

 
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, updated for Jan. 28, 2017 (Sunday)
 
To view the photos mentioned in this edition, go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca/
 
 
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.
 
For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com
 
 
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt@mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
 
 
**    Gordon Rattray made a run to Miramichi to successfully see the MISTLE THRUSH [Grive draine] on Saturday, and get a few photos after a cold morning wait. He also got a photo of a COMMON RAVEN [Grand Corbeau] with its huge bill, feathered partway down the top of the bill, the ropey texture of its neck feathering compared to the AMERICAN CROW [Corneille d'Amérique], and of course much large than a crow.  Think of the crow as a scooter and the raven as a Harley!.
 
**   Louise Richard comments that her feeder is serving more than just the birds, with a RACOON [Raton laveur] helping itself during the day, not concerned about the snow. Today’s meltdown may have lots more coming out of cold-weather snoozing.
 
**  Brian Stone and I headed towards Halifax on Saturday hoping to have an audience with the KELP GULL, a Nova Scotia first, found recently by Jim Edsall. It was present for 3 hours at MacCormack's Beach in the morning, which was just before we got there. It did not return and was not relocated.
 En route, we went through the Tantramar Marsh and very much enjoyed a cooperative LAPLAND LONGSPUR [Plectrophane lapon], which even showed the spur on its leg that gives it its name. Gary Dupuis also got a  good observation of it. We were lucky to spot a BOBCAT [Lynx roux] which showed all its cat stealth on seeing us, but assumed that we could not see it. The 83X-zoom cameras gave some nice observations of its behaviour. It was very likely a young animal, as this is the time of year when female Bobcats go into oestrus, and suddenly well-cared-for teenagers are told to be on their way. The young ones are more apt to be seen hunting during the day, as the tummy can be rumbling a bit more without mama’s help.
 
 
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
 
BOBCAT JAN. 27, 2018. . BRIAN STONE

BOBCAT JAN. 27, 2018. . BRIAN STONE

BOBCAT JAN. 27, 2018.  NELSON POIRIER

LAPLAND LONGSPUR. JAN 27, 2018. GARY DUPUIS

LAPLAND LONGSPUR. JAN 27, 2018. NELSON POIRIER 

LAPLAND LONGSPUR. JAN 27, 2018. NELSON POIRIER 

LAPLAND LONGSPUR. JAN 27, 2018. NELSON POIRIER 

MISTLE THRUSH. JAN 27, 2018. GORDON RATTRAY 

MISTLE THRUSH. JAN 27, 2018. GORDON RATTRAY 

RACCOON. JAN 27, 2018. LOUISE RICHARD

RAVEN. JAN 27, 2018. GORDON RATTRAY