Friday, 23 February 2018

Feb 23 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, February 23, 2018 (Friday)


 Please advise editor at nelson@nb.sympatico.ca if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

For more information on Nature Moncton, check into the website at
www.naturemoncton.com

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca.

** It’s last call to the Nature Moncton bird feeder tour happening tomorrow, Saturday Feb. 24th.  Meet at 8:30 AM at the northeast corner of the coliseum parking lot.  The first stop will be the Renton’s in Stilesville where there will probably be lots of birds; however, the awesome breakfast of pancakes with all the fixins’ Jean and Billy have ready for the group is always a major hit.  A drop box for a dollar donation will be out.  After leaving the Renton’s, the group will travel convoy style to a quick stop to visit the ducks at Mapleton Park, then on to a few other area feeders to end up at Nelson and Pat Poirier’s in the afternoon.  Please take note of the contact cell number of 381-3284 to have on hand if anyone gets lost from the group or wishes to join at any time.  All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not.

** Brian Coyle noted his first PINE SISKIN [Tarin des pins] at his Lower Mountain Rd. feeder yard two days ago.  It is odd this year where several have had just one lone bird drop by.  This is normally a flocking bird acting like a group of bees when they arrive at a feeder.  I also had one lone Pine Siskin drop by as well.  Brian also sees a BROWN CREEPER [Grimpereau brun] most days gleaning insects off of some yard Spruce trees.

** Janet Kempster and Brian Stone made a birding run of the Memramcook area across to Rte 933 to Haute-Aboujagane to Shediac on Thursday.  Brian got some nice photos of the WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH [Sittelle à poitrine blanche] at Jules Cormier’s Memramcook feeder, and there were many AMERICAN TREE SPARROW [Bruant hudsonien] present, but a CLAY-COLORED SPARROW [Bruant des plaines] did not show while they were there.  On Rte 933 near Haute-Aboujagane, a roadside stop netted a cooperative BOREAL CHICKADEE[Mésange à tête brune], a species it seems harder to locate now.  Also a lone PINE SISKIN [Tarin des pins] perched atop a conifer leader tip.  A pair of BALD EAGLES [Pygargue à tête blanche] seemed to have bonding in mind at Pointe du Chêne wharf as well as Goldeneyes [Garrot] and Mergansers [Harle] enjoying the open water around the Big Lobster.  Brian comments that the solar halos were exceptional on Thursday.  There are two links attached to check out for folks who wish to learn more about them.

** This week’s Sky-at-a-Glance is added to this edition, courtesy of sky-guru Curt Nason.

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, February 24 - March 3

We are all familiar with the weather-related saying that March comes in like a lion and goes out like a lamb. This has a connection with the constellations, most likely by coincidence. As evening begins in early March, Leo the Lion is rising above the eastern horizon. I’d be blowing hot air if I claimed the roaring winds of early March were due to Leo announcing his presence.

Is there a lamb in the sky? Aries the Ram fits the bill, having been a
lamb in his early days. As darkness settles in at the end of March,
Aries is going out of the sky just above the western horizon. I’d be
pulling the wool over your eyes if I claimed that was responsible for
any calm weather we experience at that time. Beware the I’ds of March.

This Week in the Solar System
Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 7:07 am and sunset will occur at 5:58 pm, giving 10 hours, 51 minutes of daylight (7:10 am and 6:04 pm in Saint John). Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 6:54 am and set at 6:08 pm, giving 11 hours, 14 minutes of daylight (6:58am and 6:14 pm in Saint John).

The Moon is full on Thursday, the Mi’kmaq Snow Blinding Moon. Jupiter, Mars and Saturn are three good reasons to take a telescope outside an hour before sunrise. This summer they will be at their best for evening observing. By midweek Mercury sets in the west 45 minutes after sunset and 15 minutes before Venus. The next few weeks will be the best time to see Mercury for the year, as the steep angle of the ecliptic on March evenings places it higher in the sky than usual.

On Friday, February 23, Astronomy Moncton will hold a telescope clinic at Moncton High School beginning at 4 pm, followed by guides to observing the sky in the evening. See their website or Facebook page for details. The Saint John Astronomy Club meets on Saturday, March 3 at 7 pm in the Rockwood Park Interpretation Centre. All are welcome.

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
AMERICAN TREE SPARROW. FEB. 22, 2018. BRIAN STONE



BALD EAGLE (JUVENILE). FEB. 22, 2018.  BRIAN STONE

BALD EAGLES. FEB. 22, 2018. BRIAN STONE

BARROWS GOLDENEYE (MALE). FEB. 22, 2018. BRIAN STONE


BOREAL CHICKADEE.. FEB. 22, 2018. BRIAN STONE

BOREAL CHICKADEE.. FEB. 22, 2018. BRIAN STONE

Lion_Lamb

PINE SISKIN. FEB. 22, 2018. JANET KEMPSTER

PINE SISKIN. FEBRUARY 22, 2018. BRIAN COYLE

RING-NECKED PHEASANT. FEB. 22, 2018. BRIAN STONE

SOLAR HALO. FEB. 22, 2018. BRIAN STONE 

SOLAR HALO. FEB. 22, 2018. BRIAN STONE 

WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH. FEB. 22, 2018. BRIAN STONE 

WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH. FEB. 22, 2018. BRIAN STONE