Sunday, 27 May 2018

May 27 2018

 
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 27, 2018 (Sunday)
 

 To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
   Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.
 
For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com
 
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt@mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
 
 
**   It is quite possible that the MUTE SWANS [Cygne tuberculé] photographed on Jones Lake by Blair Lawrence on May 23 is the same pair that disappeared just before that from the Saint John area, and now appear to be in the Amos Point area, which again suggests that it is the same pair and the visit to Jones Lake was just a brief stopover. Where will this suspected pair end up next?
 
 
**  Duane Miller had a pair of EASTERN BLUEBIRDS [Merlebleu de l'Est] visit their St. Marcel yard, near Grand-Digue, this past week and checked out one of their nest boxes. TREE SWALLOWS [Hirondelle bicolore] have already laid claim to one box, but they hope that the bluebirds will consider the other box, which is still available. It’s great to hear all the bluebird reports.
 
 
**   It’s that time of the year when parent birds training a clutch of teenage fledglings can look a bit toil-worn.
Pat Fox noted a HAIRY WOODPECKER [Pic chevelu] fuelling up at her yard feeder, suggesting that things must be very busy for this parent showing its white feathery areas very soiled and with no time to clean up, Pat also noted a handsome BALTIMORE ORIOLE [Oriole de Baltimore] arrive in a yard apple tree.
 
 
**   Yet another INDIGO BUNTING [Passerin indigo]. Aldo Dorio spotted a bright male at Tabusintac on Saturday. He also got a photo of a pair of BROWN-HEADED COWBIRDS [Vacher à tête brune], and also of PINE SISKINS [Tarin des pins] coming to his feeder, as an increasing number of bird feeders seem to be getting at the moment.
 
 
**  In correction of a labeling error in yesterday’s edition, the butterfly labeled HOARY COMMA [Polygone gracile] was actually a GRAY COMMA [Polygone gris] and is corrected on the Blogspot. Jim Edsall points out that it is a Gray Comma, based on the lack of contrast between the inner and outer halves of the wing underside and the small spots on the upper side. They are re-attached again today, so those points can be noted.
 
 
**   Brian Stone once again sends some interesting photos from his Perth, Ontario, visit. WILD TURKEYS [Dindon sauvage] are now native to Ontario and Quebec. Brian got some nice views of a male to show all the wattles, beard and rich breeding plumage. He also got a NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW [Hirondelle à ailes hérissées] that we occasionally get in New Brunswick and do have some breeding records. It very much resembles a BANK SWALLOW [Hirondelle de rivage] at first, but lacks the neck cummerbund of the Bank Swallow. He got a very nice photo of a cooperative WILSON’S WARBLER [Paruline à calotte noire] that occurs here as well, and also a GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER [Paruline à ailes dorées] which would call for a rare bird alert in New Brunswick.
 
     He also came across a black GROUNDHOG [Marmotte commune] which appears to be what one would consider a melanistic individual, which would be rare here. I assume that is also true in Ontario. Also a MOURNING CLOAK [Morio] butterfly, which is an early butterfly here as well, and that we are starting to see now. This insect overwinters as an adult. A GRAY TREEFROG [Rainette versicolore] caught his eye. We do have this frog at several spots in New Brunswick, especially at Hyla Park in Fredericton, where it is well established, and that site set aside as an amphibian park.
 
 
**  Our little Dachshund dog is not with us this year. He would simply not allow CHIPMUNKS [Suisse] anywhere near the camp porch. This year it is only Sadie on the watch and she obeys instructions not to bother the chipmunks. They soon caught on and quickly got Pat very well-trained when she is sitting outside that they would like peanuts in the shell, please! It’s very interesting to watch them stuff 4 to 5 peanuts into their cheek-pouch grocery bags, and occasionally, take the time to chow one down.
 
 
 
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
 
BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD (PAIR). MAY 26, 2018. ALDO DORIO

EASTERN BLUEBIRD.MAY 24, 2018. GLORIA MILLER

FLYCATCHER (EMPIDONAX). MAY 24, 2018. ALDO DORIO,

FLYCATCHER (EMPIDONAX). MAY 24, 2018. ALDO DORIO,

GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER.  MAY 26, 2018. BRIAN STONE

GRAY COMMA BUTTERFLY.  MAY 24, 2018. BRIAN STONE

GRAY COMMA BUTTERFLY.  MAY 24, 2018. BRIAN STONE

GRAY COMMA BUTTERFLY.  MAY 24, 2018. BRIAN STONE

GRAY TREEFROG.  MAY 26, 2018._ BRIAN STONE

GROUNDHOG (SUSPECT MELANISTIC).  MAY 26, 2018. BRIAN STONE

HAIRY WOODPECKER (SOILED FROM FEEDING YOUNG).MAY 26, 2018. PAT FOX 

INDIGO BUNTING (MALE). MAY 26, 2018. ALDO DORIO

MOURNING CLOAK BUTTERFLY.  MAY 26, 2018. BRIAN STONE

NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED  SWALLOW.  MAY 26, 2018._ BRIAN STONE

PAT AND CHIPMUNK. MAY 26, 2018. NELSON POIRIER.

PAT AND CHIPMUNK. MAY 26, 2018. NELSON POIRIER.

PINE SISKINS. MAY 26, 2018. ALDO DORIO

WILD TURKEY.  MAY 26, 2018. BRIAN STONE

WILD TURKEY.  MAY 26, 2018. BRIAN STONE

WILSON'S WARBLER.  MAY 26, 2018. BRIAN STONE