Tuesday, 8 May 2018

May 8 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 08, 2018 ( Tuesday )

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, 
nelson@nb.sympatico.ca . Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website atwww.naturemoncton.com .

 Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Judy Marsh marshj @nbnet.nb,ca
Info Line # 506-384-397 (384-NEWS)

 
** Suzanne Gregoire came across a GREEN HERON (Heron vert) at Mapleton Park on Monday with a great photo to share. This Heron is starting to have some breeding records in New Brunswick, but they are seldom encountered in local areas.

** Dave Christie’s INDIGO BUNTING (Passerin indigo), returned on Tuesday morning to enjoy niger seed as its first choice. Dave noted today in the better light that there was less blue in the plumage than he could see in the fog of Sunday, making him reconsider the gender as female. Dave joined the RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD (Colibri a gorge rubis) welcomers with a male and suspected female on Monday.

 Dave also went to see the KING RAIL (Rale elegant) that was located at Fundy National Park. It was a bit unusually placed, not at waters edge but near the Amphitheater in a group of Red Osier Dogwood plants, and coming out occasionally to delight its many considerate visitors. Photos of this rail will be in tomorrow’s edition. Dave also noted a few BROAD-WINGED HAWK (Petite Buse) moving about on Monday.

** Roger LeBlanc and Alain Clavette did a birding round of the Memramcook Valley area on Monday to tally 63 species. Of special note was a EURASIAN WIGEON (Canard siffleur) and a male WILSON”S PHALAROPE (Phalarope de Wilson) at the new lagoon across the Memramcook River from the Arthur Street Lagoon. They also saw a bright breeding male CAPE MAY WARBLER (Paruline tigree).

** Doreen Rossiter usually does have a GROUNDHOG (Marmotte commune) about her yard, but this year has a pair. The female is smaller and has a paler pelage  than the male. They are not at all shy about their courtship and ensuing family preparations. Doreen had a pair once before and took great interest in watching the female carrying the young about by the scruff of the neck. Doreen found a book in a thrift shop, entitled “America’s Favorite Backyard Wildlife”, by Kevin George Harrison. She comments she finds this book so very helpful to explain her visitors, including insects and all types of yard life.

**Mac Wilmot had a rewarding experience when a SAVANNAH SPARROW (Bruant des pres) struck a window of his home. It seemed badly hurt, with several drops of blood coming from the mouth and in respiratory distress. Mac kept it secluded and quiet for four hours. It was still breathing hard, but alive. He asked for the help of his veterinarian neighbour, Dr. Ann Mack, who took it for the night and some medical attention. The next morning it was very much recovered and raring to go. It flew off to continue its summer mission. As Mac comments it is great to have Ann Mack as a neighbour.

** David Cannon reports the first salamander visitors to his yard swimming pool off the Ammon Road, with lots of wooded areas around. He scooped up five Red-backed Salamanders and returned them to the woods on Monday. They also had their first Ruby-throated Hummingbird arrive on Monday.

** The OSPREY (Balbuzard pecheur) nest off Linda Street, off Chemin St. Joseph on the south side of the Bouctouche River, that was taken over by BALD EAGLES this spring (Pygargue a tete blanche), was badly damaged by the wind on Saturday. Jean Paul LeBlanc got a photo of it on Monday and there were no eagles in the area. Jean Paul and Stella also had their first season visit from two WHITE-CROWNED SPARROWS (Bruant a couronne blanc). We get a short window to see this species as they stop for refueling on their way to breed to the north of us.

** Mitch Doucet shares a few great photos he got recently of a NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH (Paruline des ruisseaux), a warbler that likes fresh water shore lines and wet areas. A VIRGINA RAIL (Rale de Virginie) in Riverview and a CHIMNEY SWIFT (Martinet ramoneur) in flight in the Hillsborough  area. The Chimney Swift is almost always in flight, except when on a nest or night roosting.

** Aldo Doiro got a nice photo of a BROWN CREEPER (Grimtereau brun) on Monday at Hay Island. It is always a treat to see and watch their up the tree spiralling modus operand. Aldo also got a photo of a female BELTED KINGFISHER (Martin-pecheur d’Amerique), sporting its reddish chest band, that its male counterpart does not have.

Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
BALD EAGLE NEST DAMAGED. MAY 7,2018. JP LEBLANC

BELTED KINGFISHER. MAY 7, 2018. ALDO DORIO

BROWN CREEPER. MAY 7, 2018. ALDO DORIO

CHIMNEY SWIFT.APRIL 30, 2018. MITCH DOUCET

GREEN HERON. MAY 7, 2018. SUZANNE GREGOIRE

NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH.APRIL 30, 2018. MITCH DOUCET

VIRGINIA RAIL  APRIL 30, 2018. MITCH DOUCET

WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW. MAY 7, 2018. JP LEBLANC

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