Sunday, 2 December 2018

Dec 2 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 2, 2018 (Sunday)

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Editor: Nelson Poirier   
Transcript by: David Christie   
Info Line telephone # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Audrey Goguen recently reported about an AMERICAN ROBIN [Merle d’Amérique] keeping vigil on a flowering crab tree in her Moncton yard. It had to share its turf with ten WAXWINGS [jaseurs] on Saturday.

Dave Christie had no sunshine at Mary’s Point on Saturday to get good photos of his suspected Oregon Junco. The attached photo was the best he could get of the probable Oregon Junco, to showing its slate gray hood, buffy brown flanks and brown back.


** There are many feeder yards that will soon get visits from MALLARD [Canard colvert] ducks that have no qualms about staying with us over winter, especially if they find open water and enjoy food items dropped to the ground from bird feeders. Mac Wilmot sends a photo of a group of Mallards enjoying the remnant open water in his Lower Coverdale yard pond and waddle up to the bird feeder area to see what has been dropped. They have a real fondness for cracked corn, and it’s always interesting to watch for the odd tag-along, such as Black Duck [Canard noir], American Wigeon [Canard d’Amérique], Northern Pintail [Canard pilet], or even maybe a Wood Duck [Canard branchu].

** The next month can be a great time around wharves and lagoons as seabirds start to collect in smaller areas. Aldo Dorio is noting COMMON EIDER [Eider à duvet], RED-BREASTED MERGANSER [Harle huppé], COMMON MERGANSER [Grand Harle], and COMMON GOLDENEYES [Garrot à oeil d’or] off Hay Island. Fog seemed to affect Aldo’s photos making them not clear enough for the Blogspot today.



Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
MALLARD DUCKS. NOV 30, 2018. MAC WILMOT

OREGON JUNCO (SUSPECTED). DEC 1, 2018. DAVE CHRISTIE

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