Wednesday, 18 December 2019

Dec 18 2019


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 18, 2019 (Wednesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** What an awesome EASTERN BLUEBIRD [Merlebleu de l'Est] event for December 17th. Alain Clavette had 5 Eastern Bluebirds and one PINE WARBLER [Paruline des pins] traveling with them in his Taylor Village yard on Tuesday. They were cavorting around the nest boxes and visiting a Mountain Ash tree. Alain suspects that they were part of a group of 18 Eastern Bluebirds that visited his yard a month ago. At that time 2 Pine Warblers were traveling with them. It’s been a great year for Eastern Bluebirds in New Brunswick and now it is appearing that it was also a great year for Pine Warblers as a significant number have been reported in the last few weeks.

** Brian Stone got a photo of BAYBERRY [Myrique] in December, showing its winter clinging fruit and alternate red buds. The berries have a large central seed, with a thin lipid layer coating. The lipid layer of the berry makes it a potential winter food source for some birds. The Yellow-rumped Warbler is sometimes seen using it. The berries can be melted down to make a pleasant scented candle wax but it takes many, many berries to end up with a candle.

Brian also got a photo of a Balsam Fir tree laden with cones shedding their cone scales and seeds. Balsam Fir is the only native conifer that arranges its cones vertically upward. Also some photos of the interesting crystal shapes frost can make. A bird we are not seeing much of at the moment, a PURPLE FINCH [Roselin pourpré], posed.

 On Monday evening Brian got a nice photo in the clear evening sky, at 12:38 am, actually the beginning moments of Tuesday, of the white to blue-white star SIRIUS in the constellation Canis Major, which is the brightest (visibly) star in the night sky. The blue-white star RIGEL and the orange-red toned star BETELGEUSE show as well in the constellation of Orion. While Sirius appears brightest to us in the night sky because it is physically closer to us, the actual brightness of these three stars would be ranked Rigel first and then Betelgeuse second and Sirius third if they were all at the same distance from us.

** It appears that the INDIGO BUNTING [Passerin indigo] has taken its leave of our Moncton feeder yard. We enjoyed it and many folks dropped by to successfully have an audience with it from December 6th to December 13th to get on the “count period” but not on the “count day”. Oddly my small showing of 4 sparrows left at the same time but a few dribbled back on Tuesday.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton





BALSAM FIR CONES SHEDDING SEEDS. DEC. 17, 2019. BRIAN STONE

PURPLE FINCH. DEC. 17, 2019.  BRIAN STONE

BAYBERRY (WINTER BUDS AND CLINGING WINTER FRUIT) DEC 6, 2019. BRIAN STONE

BAYBERRY. DEC 6, 2019. BRIAN STONE

ORION CONSTELLATION (INCLUDING SIRIUS, RIGEL,AND BETELGEUSE). DEC. 17, 2019.  BRIAN STONE
ORION CONSTELLATION (INCLUDING SIRIUS, RIGEL,AND BETELGEUSE). DEC. 17, 2019.  BRIAN STONE

ORION CONSTELLATION . DEC. 17, 2019. BRIAN STONE

FROST. DEC. 17, 2019. BRIAN STONE

FROST. DEC. 17, 2019. BRIAN STONE