Wednesday, 22 January 2020

Jan 22 2020

 NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 22, 2020 (Wednesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Pat McLaughlin came across an interesting scenario this Sunday. She was on a groomed four-wheeler trail near Curry Corner in Bathurst. Sitting in the middle of the trail was a SURF SCOTER [Macreuse à front blanc] which was several miles from water. They thought it couldn’t fly from the ground as when they approached it, it just flopped into the deep snow on the side of the trail. A few minutes later it came back on to the trail and when they started the bike it started to run and managed to get itself airborne. They hoped that it flew far enough to make it to open water. The Scoters, like many pelagic waterfowl, have great difficulty taking flight from land if they accidentally end up there. They are designed for life on the water and they run on the water surface to take flight as their center of gravity is farther back on their bodies to enable diving deeper for food.

** Peter and Deanna Gadd checked a few spots along the coast en route to Miramichi on Tuesday and came across hundreds of MALLARD DUCKS, a handful of Black Ducks, and 2 Northern Pintail in a freshwater pond adjacent the Bouctouche water treatment lagoons. Among them was a mystery entry. Peter got an excellent photo to suggest it is very possibly a leucistic Mallard Duck among the throng of ducks. It surely does stand out and one suspect more of us may get to see at this popular duck overwintering site


** Doreen Rossiter had a visit from a male RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER [Pic à ventre roux] to her Alma yard on Tuesday morning. Doreen had a male Red-bellied Woodpecker visit her yard on December 19th so I am not sure if this may be the same one or another in the area.

** Daryl Doucet got some nice photos of HOUSE FINCHES [Roselin familier] visiting his Moncton feeder yard showing the variability among the males and the relatively conservatively dressed females. Daryl also photographed several AMERICAN BLACK DUCKS [Canard noir] in the open water around the newly opened Cocagne bridge.

** A lot of us have been wondering where the Red-breasted Nuthatches are this year, with so many cones available for them. Jane Leblanc did have 2 RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES [Sittelle à poitrine rousse] show up at her St. Martins feeder yard on Tuesday for the first time this season.

** AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique] seem to be showing up more. Clarence Cormier had 1 arrive on Tuesday afternoon to his Grande Digue site. This is his first sighting of a Robin since October 13th 2019. The Mountain Ash trees are still full of berries in his area. On Monday a large NORTHERN GOSHAWK [Autour des palombes] dropped by his feeder area in hot pursuit of a male RING-NECKED PHEASANT [Faisan de Colchide]. They fought for a few seconds then the pheasant escaped and flew off with the goshawk in hot pursuit. Clarence comments that his daily feeder activity has increased, but only slightly. Notable are 8 to 13 AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS [Bruant hudsonien] present and 7 RING-NECKED PHEASANTS [Faisan de Colchide].

** A feature that helps to separate the similar Clay-colored Sparrow and the Chipping Sparrow is the grey back area of the Chipping Sparrow which is more brown in the Clay-colored Sparrow. There are other clues as well but this one is helpful. My now seemingly resident, winter plumaged CHIPPING SPARROW [Bruant familier] gave an opportunity to get a photo to show that feature. It seemed to take the recent cold snap fine, and I hope it stays until spring to watch the change to breeding plumage.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton




DUCK (LEUCISTIC MALLARD DUCK SUSPECTED) JAN 21, 2020. PETER GADD

HOUSE FINCH (FEMALES). JAN 21, 2020. DARYL DOUCET

HOUSE FINCH (MALE). JAN 21, 2020. DARYL DOUCET

HOUSE FINCH (MALE). JAN 21, 2020. DARYL DOUCET

HOUSE FINCH (FEMALE). JAN 21, 2020. DARYL DOUCET

CHIPPING SPARROW. JAN 21, 2020. NELSON POIRIER

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH. JAN. 21, 2020. JANE LEBLANC

BLACK DUCKS. JAN 21, 2020. DARYL DOUCET