Tuesday, 28 January 2020

Jan 28 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, January 28, 2020 (Tuesday)

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: david.cannon@rogers.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**  Louise Nichols got a video of a group of WHITE-WINGED CROSSBILLS [Bec-croisé bifascié] feeding in the very abundant tree-top café near his Aulac home. They were not vocalizing at the time, as they often are, but check out the action at the attached link.


**  Clarence Cormier had a flock of 12 AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique] arrive at his Grande-Digue site on Monday, and many of them landed on the roof! To his surprise, they were thirsty and drinking from the cool water from the melting ice on his roof. Others remained perched nearby, in the MOUNTAIN ASH trees, still laden with berries. Eleven BLUE JAYS [Geai bleu] also arrived Monday, to enjoy Black-oil Sunflower seed.

** Jamie and Karen Burris got some excellent still photos of a SHARP-SHINNED HAWK [Épervier brun] that has their Riverview feeder yard as a territory. The photos do show the more laterally flattened legs of the Sharp-Shinned Hawk versus the COOPER'S HAWK [Épervier de Cooper] and the continuous dark of the crown extending down the nape to create a hooded look versus the Coopers Hawk’s dark-capped crown, along with the lack of roundness to the tail tip and relatively muted white apex. It would be assumed this is a female Sharp-Shinned Hawk as a MOURNING DOVE [Tourterelle triste] would be a large prey for a smaller male. They also found the remains of a ROCK PIGEON [Pigeon biset] in their feeder yard which again would be large prey for even a female Sharp-Shinned Hawk.  Jamie got a video of a Sharp-Shinned Hawk consuming its prey, which can be viewed at the attached site.  Raptors have to eat as well, and they waste nothing.



** Many of us have wondered where the DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoisé] and RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES [Sittelle à poitrine rousse] are this year, yet some feeder areas seem to have them in good numbers. Kevin Renton reports that, at their Stilesville feeder yard, the Dark-Eyed Junco numbers have jumped from 10 to 25 on Monday.  Also the increased activity got the attention of a Sharp-Shinned Hawk.

Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton




SHARP SHINNED HAWK. JAN 26 2020. JAMIE BURRIS

SHARP SHINNED HAWK. JAN 26 2020. KAREN BURRIS

SHARP SHINNED HAWK WITH MOURNING DOVE PREY. JAN 26, 2020. JAMIE BURRIS


AMERICAN ROBIN JAN 27, 2020 CLARENCE CORMIER