Saturday, 29 February 2020

Feb 29 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, 29 February 2020 (Saturday)

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

**It’s a very special time window at the moment to see HORNED LARKS [Alouette hausse-col] and SNOW BUNTINGS [Plectrophane des neiges], as they gravitate to Donald Harper Road and Folkins Drive on the Tantramar Marsh perimeter to get to the graveled areas at roadside. Louise Nichols visited the area on Friday in the after-storm sunshine to see a flock of approximately 40 Horned Larks [Alouette hausse-col] and 20 Snow Buntings [Plectrophane des neiges]. Louise also spotted that special Snow Bunting tag-along, a lone LAPLAND LONGSPUR [Plectrophane lapon], to get some great photos of all three species.

**So nice to see the PURPLE FINCH [Roselin pourpré] moving into New Brunswick in number now. Jane LeBlanc had a dozen show up at her St Martin’s feeder yard after the storm, apparently mixed gender. A few pleasant photos of their arrival are attached.

**Brian Stone and I did a swing around Jones Lake midday on Friday. Approximately 50 AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique] were moving about the trees with winter-clinging fruit, and were very vocal. The orange breasts and dark heads of most we saw seemed very bright, to make us wonder if the flock was predominantly male. Some CEDAR WAXWINGS [Jaseur d'Amérique] were also present, but the Robins outnumbered them, were much more expressive, and the Robins moved about the neighbouring area much more than the Waxwings.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton


LAPLAND LONGSPUR. FEB. 28,  2020. LOUISE NICHOLS

LAPLAND LONGSPUR. FEB. 28,  2020. LOUISE NICHOLS

HORNED LARKS. FEB. 28, 2020. LOUISE NICHOLS

HORNED LARK. FEB. 28, 2020. LOUISE NICHOLS

SNOW BUNTINGS. FEB. 28, 2020. LOUISE NICHOLS
PURPLE FINCH (MALE). FEB. 28,2020.  JANE LEBLANC


PURPLE FINCH (FEMALE PLUMAGE). FEB. 28,2020.  JANE LEBLANC
PURPLE FINCH. FEB. 28,2020.  JANE LEBLANCa


CEDAR WAXWINGS AND AMERICAN ROBINS. FEB. 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

CEDAR WAXWING. FEB. 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

 AMERICAN ROBIN. FEB. 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

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