Tuesday, 17 March 2020

March 17 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 17, 2020 (Tuesday)

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: david.cannon@rogers.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Gordon Rattray got a few awesome photos of RIVER OTTERS [Loutre de rivière] fishing at Graybrook Pond in Hillsborough on Monday. There were 2 animmals Gordon saw; one photo shows one with an AMERICAN EEL [Anguille d’Amérique] as prey. Gordon also comments that he had his first PURPLE FINCH [Roselin pourpré] arrive to his Weldon feeder yard along with COMMON GRACKLES [Quiscale bronzé] and RED WINGED BLACKBIRDS [Carouge à épaulettes]. Graybrook Pond had a male HOODED MERGANSER [Harle couronné], an AMERICAN BLACK DUCK [Canard noir] and a MALLARD DUCK [Canard colvert] on Sunday, with the Black Duck numbers swelling to 6 on Monday.

** After a few attempts, Louise Nichols was able to have a pleasant audience with the HAWK OWL [Chouette épervière] in the Minudie area of Nova Scotia on Monday morning. Louise comments it appeared to be much untroubled by her presence in the usual Hawk Owl fashion, perching in a tree roadside. It later simply flew across the road from her to a branch with eyes to the ground on the hunt. Louise was able to capture nice photos despite the snow flurries.  A very pleasant birding experience; there is no greater compliment than being ignored when observing wildlife.

**  Mac Wilmot operates a small maple sugar house and left a window ajar on Sunday night to dissipate heat to find he had an additional staff member, a RACOON [Raton laveur], on Monday. Mac was not impressed with the new staff as it refused to split wood or feed the fire, and worse yet, to acknowledge its dismissal and depart.

** The CANADA GEESE [Bernaches du Canada] are back in very significant numbers. Daryl Doucet photographed one seemingly clapping its wings with delight to be back. In the same area, a group of mixed-gender COMMON MERGANZERS [Grand Harle] were snoozing away the day.

**  Roger LeBlanc comments he was surprised to see a migrating flock of AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique] at his in-town Moncton site. He doesn’t usually see flocks moving through that part of the city.

** Brian Stone drove through a mini-blizzard near Sackville on Monday to photograph a flock of freshly arrived CANADA GEESE [Bernaches du Canada] that didn’t seem as troubled as the traffic was by the visibility, just happy to find bare ground to forage on.

Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton




RIVER OTTER. MAR 16, 2020.  GORDON RATTRAY

RIVER OTTER. MAR 16, 2020.  GORDON RATTRAY

NORTHERN HAWK OWL. MARCH 16, 2020. LOUISE NICHOLS

NORTHERN HAWK OWL. MARCH 16, 2020. LOUISE NICHOLS

CANADA GOOSE. MARCH 15, 2020. DARYL DOUCET

COMMON MERGANSERS. MARCH 15, 2020. DARYL DOUCET

RACCOON. MARCH 16, 2020.  MAC WILMOT

RACCOON. MARCH 16, 2020.  MAC WILMOT

CANADA GEESE. MAR.16, 2020. BRIAN STONE

CANADA GEESE. MAR.16, 2020. BRIAN STONE