Monday, 2 March 2020

March 2 2020




NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 2, 2020 (Monday) 


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Edited by Nelson Poirier, nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by David Christie, maryspt@mac.com
Info Line #:  506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


                                                      
** March 1 brought a welcome surprise visitor to Doreen Rossiter’s Alma feeder yard, when a bright adult male RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD [Carouge à épaulettes] arrived. Doreen has not seen a Red-winged Blackbird since November 11, 2019 and strongly suspects that this is a new arrival. Doreen is usually among the first to get early spring migrants. March is often the time we can expect the first of the blackbird clan to return. However, March 1st is a very early date for first scouts to arrive. If this is indeed an early migrant it should be followed very soon by some of its kin. The adult males are normally the first to arrive. Only the bird knows for sure, but the thought of it being a new arrival must be considered as such. If this is indeed an early migrant it should be followed very soon by more of its kin.

[Insertion by transcriber]: And, indeed, John Inman reports that Sunday brought a flock of 12 male Red-winged Blackbirds to his yard at 225 Mary’s Point Road in Harvey, and he had seen a couple there a day or two earlier.

Doreen also awoke early Sunday morning to a flock of 40 AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d’Amérique] gleaning the remaining mountain-ash berries, flowering crab and Highbush Cranberry fruit. Doreen comments that she thinks all the winter-hanging fruit around her yard area is now consumed.


** Many residents of some areas of New Brunswick have become very aware of how urbanized WHITE-TAILED DEER [Chevreuil de Virginie] can become. St. Andrews and Quispamsis seem to have become headquarters. Jack Perry’s trail camera shows one sauntering across a parking lot, taken from his apartment deck, which is lit by a light at night. This was taken just after midnight on February 29, as the new day started on Sand Cove Road in the City of Saint John. White-tailed Deer are down in numbers in some areas of NB, especially in wooded areas in the north and higher altitudes in the south. Life must be a lot easier taking on “urban goat” behavior to get out of line of predators like Coyotes and heavy snow in some winters, and I’m sure those delicious cedar hedges are inviting as well.


** Bob Blake maintains a record of early morning temperatures and daily high temperatures from his Second North River home and sends a table to compare those statistics between February of 2019 and February of 2020. The precipitation comparison is certainly dramatic with 57 cm of snow in Feb. 2019 compared to 34 cm precipitation in Feb. 2020 and almost half of that was rain. Enjoy it all while it lasts but March has arrived, so maybe it will.

Weather stats comparing February 2019 and February 2020

2019
2020
morning temperatures
daily highs -precipitation
morning temperatures
daily highs -precipitation
 -17-1 day
-16-1
-15-5
-14-4
-13-3
-12-2
-11-1
-9-1
-8-3
--6-2
-5-1
-4-1
-2-1
+2-1
+6-1
Hi’s
-11-2
-10-5
-9-2
-8-1
-7-2
-6-1
-5-3
-4-1
-2-2
0-3
+2-2
+3-1
+6-1
57 cms. snow
 -22-1
-20-1
-19-1
-18-3
-14-1
-12-1
-9-1
-8-2
-7-2
-6-1
-5-1
-4-5
-3-2
-2-1
-1-3
0-2

 Hi’s
-12-1
-11-1
-9-1
-8-1
-6-2
-5-1
-4-1
-2-1
-1-1
+1-8
+2-4
+3-1
+5-1
+6-1
+7-2
24 cms. snow
10 mms. rain




** Pat Gibbs photographed the trail of her resident RING-NECKED PHEASANT [Faisan de Colcide] that imprinted so nicely in the dusting of snow on Saturday night. The calm stepping looks like it settled things with its male intruder of a few days earlier.



Nelson Poirier   <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>
Nature Moncton



WHITE-TAILED DEER. FEB 29, 2020. JACK PERRY

RING-NECKED PHEASANT TRAIL. MARCH 1, 2020. PAT GIBBS