Saturday, 30 May 2020

May 30 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, 30 May 2020 (Saturday)

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**Rick Elliott captured a photo of a RED KNOT [Bécasseau maubèche] in the fog and mist at Waterside Beach on Friday evening. I suspect this would be quite an unexpected shorebird to see in New Brunswick at this time of year, as they would tend to be migrating in the more central corridor of North America to reach their northern breeding grounds. An added bonus is seeing it in approaching breeding plumage.

**Aldo Dorio got a photo of a RED-EYED VIREO [Viréo aux yeux rouges] as well as a PHILADELPHIA VIREO [Viréo de Philadelphie] at Hay Island. The Philadelphia Vireo is one that we seldom get good photos of, as they tend to be very high in the canopy and active. The Red-eyed Vireo is much easier to see and get photos of. Aldo’s photo is the first Philadelphia Vireo to be recorded at Hay Island.

**Phil Riebel in Miramichi got an excellent photo of a MEADOW VOLE [Campagnol des champs] with his camera trap. We seldom get the opportunity to see such clear, complete photos of this common small rodent. They may be common, but their lifestyle indicates we just don’t see them very often.

**This comment may get disagreement from some, but I love to see a yard full of blooming DANDELIONS [Pissenlit], as it means those Queen Bees [Reines-abeilles] that are out seeking a bit of pollen to get a new nest started are supplied. The bees are so very important for pollination of so many things, and as the queen bee is the only member of last year’s nest to survive the winter and start the cycle again, she is one very, very important lady! There is no danger of being stung at the moment, as she has no nest to protect. I was looking at our neglected camp lawn on Friday morning, with the remark made it should be cut soon. With all the queen bees working the dandelions, we’ll leave any mowing to a later date.
 A CANADA GOOSE [Bernache du Canada] family went steaming by down the river, seemingly on a mission.
Also, the CHIPMUNKS [Suisse] are again on the deck looking for unshelled peanuts. They well know the sound when a nut hits the deck floor, and come running. Pat enjoys hand-feeding them and putting them between her toes, to make some very happy-camper Chipmunks.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton


RED KNOT. MAY 29, 2020. RICK ELLIOT

MEADOW VOLE. MAY 29, 2020. PHIL RIEBEL

PHILADELPHIA VIREO. MAY 29, 2020. ALDO DORIO

RED-EYED VIREO. MAY 29, 2020. ALDO DORIO

TRICOLORED BUMBLEBEE (QUEEN). MAY 29, 2020. NELSON POIRIER

CANADA GOOSE FAMILY. MAY 29, 2020. NELSON POIRIER 

CHIPMUNK SNACK. MAY 29, 2020. NELSON POIRIER

CHIPMUNK SNACK. MAY 29, 2020. NELSON POIRIER

CHIPMUNK SNACK. MAY 29, 2020. NELSON POIRIER

CHIPMUNK SNACK. MAY 29, 2020. NELSON POIRIER

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