Thursday, 15 October 2020

Oct 15 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, October 15, 2020 (Thursday)  

 

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 

** It is apparent that PINE SISKINS [Tarin des pins] are flocking in the area at the moment. Jamie Burris had a flock of 30 + land in his Riverview back yard on Wednesday morning and were gathering in grapevines. Jamie comments that he has never had this happen before. Jamie’s report follows Aldo Dorio’s of yesterday of seeing Pine Siskins gathering at Hay Island and Lois Budd is having some patronize her feeder yard as well. Maybe we are in for a Pine Siskin winter.

 

** David Lilly got an excellent photo of a young-of-the-year HERMIT THRUSH [Grive solitaire] in his Oromocto yard earlier in the season. The spotting on the crown of the head and the mantle help to separate the Hermit Thrush juvenile from other thrushes, with the exception of the American Robin.

 

** Gordon Rattray sends photos of his Weldon yard bird patrons on Wednesday. It’s always nice to see WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCHES [Sittelle à poitrine blanche] that seem to be at a premium in the Moncton area. Gordon had 4 PURPLE FINCHES [Roselin pourpré] come by. It is to be remembered that the male Purple Finches do not take on their reddish plumage until the second year, so young- of- the- year males may appear in female plumage. House Finch males do molt into red tones in their plumage in their first fall.

 

** Lois Budd shares a photo of the differences between PINE SISKIN [Tarin des pins] and AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune]. She comments that these 2 species can sometimes frustrate her when they are both at her sunflower chip feeder. Except for their size and their bill the female PURPLE FINCH [Roselin pourpré] can also be hard to distinguish. The Purple Finch in Lois’s photo is probably a female or a young-of-the-year male as the reddish tones on it could well be from background red colour reflecting in the photo. It is always great to hear feeder reports and what feed and feeders are favoured.

 

** Suzanne Rousseau came across an immature male COMMON EIDER [Eider à duvet] on the Sussex trail and it let her get within 6 feet of it. It may have been injured but sometimes when seabirds like eiders get stranded on land they have difficulty lifting off in flight, so it may have just needed a rest before attempting to get airborne. The flightless stage of eclipse should be long past by now so that was probably not a factor.

 

** A Nature Moncton field trip to visit a few of the local lagoons for waterfowl, especially at a time of potential migration for some of them, was scheduled for this coming Saturday, October 17th. Due to the increase in Covid-19 restrictions in the area this event is cancelled and cannot be rescheduled due to seasonal timing and uncertainty about future restrictions.    

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




 

HERMIT THRUSH. (YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR) JULY 23, 2020. DAVID LILLY

WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH. OCT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH. OCT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

COMMON EIDER (IMMATURE MALE). OCT 14, 2020. SUZANNE ROUSSEAU

COMMON EIDER (IMMATURE MALE). OCT 14, 2020. SUZANNE ROUSSEAU

HAIRY WOODPECKER. OCT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

DOWNY WOODPECKER. OCT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY

PINE SISKIN AND AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. OCT 14, 2020. LOIS BUDD

PINE SISKIN, AMERICAN GOLDFINCH, AND PURPLE FINCH. OCT 14, 2020. LOIS BUDD


BLUE JAY. OCT 14, 2020. GORDON RATTRAY