Monday, 11 October 2021

Oct 11 2021

NATURE MONCTON NATURE INFORMATION LINE, Oct. 11, 2021 (Monday)

 

 

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Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 

**Yvette Richard was another to capture the waxing crescent moon on Saturday night. It will be at its first-quarter phase on October 13.

 

**Lois Budd went on a fall drive on Sunday in the Mount Eagle area. She noticed a group of Eastern Bluebirds on the hydro lines and in the trees below. There were two adults and several juvenile birds. They seemed nervous and not staying long enough for photos, but Lois did manage one.   Vicky McKnight was also delighted to see one on the pole checking out her Nature Moncton nesting box.   Vicky is hoping he/she will return next spring before the Tree Swallows do and take up residence.   Lois’s White-breasted Nuthatch has also arrived at her feeders and enjoying peanuts and suet.   She expects it will stay all winter.  

 

 

**Gordon Rattray paid a Sackville visit on Sunday afternoon. The Lorne Street water retention pond was a bust assuming something had scared off the normally lively community of patrons there.

 

He dropped by the Sackville Waterfowl Park to find some male Gadwall (in this Gadwall photo, note the large chestnut patch ahead of the white speculum. This is the chestnut-coloured portion of the inner median and lesser wing coverts that is very pronounced in this photo. We usually see this area evident in flight more so than in the sitting bird) and American Wigeon well on the return to breeding plumage. The ever-present Canada Geese provided a nice flight photo. A bright red Autumn Meadowhawk dragonfly showing its signature brown legs posed.

 

 

**A few photos scheduled to go yesterday got accidentally misplaced. One was Cathy Simon’s photo of the Wilson’s Snipe at the Sackville Waterfowl Park. Photos that are inserted after the blog is made lose quality. Cathy’s photo is reinserted properly today. I also neglected to add some great photos Brian Stone got of a Yellow-rumped Warbler at Petit cap. It nicely shows the yellow rump, yellow patches ahead of the wing, split white eye ring, and white throat area that are signature field marks for this common warbler.

 

 

 **Brian Stone went for a scenic drive on Saturday and ended up walking a short section of the Dobson Trail off the Prosser Brook Rd. The weather was great, and the woods were pristine and wonderfully quiet. A few SHADOW DARNER DRAGONFLIES were out and flying and one female paused in flight long enough for Brian to get a clear flight photo. It was very nice of her to hover so steadily long enough for the camera to find focus before landing to lay some eggs. Brian also photographed some of the aging mushrooms along the trail along with brightly coloured RED MAPLE leaves and similarly bright HOBBLEBUSH leaves.

 

Brian got photos of the Honey Mushroom with one photo showing its true spore print colour of pale yellow as the spores fall on caps below in the group. In the bright light, the spore print appears as white as it is falling on a yellow brown surface, but the shadowed area shows the true spore print of pale yellow (arrowed). One of his photos also shows the Elizabethan collar style partial veil nicely. Brian also photographed the Scarlet Waxy Cap Mushroom. The waxy cap group fruit late in the season and are a very waxy texture when hand crushed.

 

 

**On the Nature Moncton visit to the Sussex Bluff, we noted many small white elongated objects on the blades of some grasses and sometimes on the mid-vein of leaves to wonder what they were as per the attached photos. John van der Linden from BugGuide explained as below

 

“This is the pupal case sticking out of its cocoon. The caterpillar built the cocoon and pupated inside of it; when it was ready to emerge, the pupa thrust itself out of the cocoon and the adult broke out of the pupal skin. What's left behind is the pupal skin partially extruded from the cocoon. One group of moths is known as the "ribbed cocoon-maker moths" for their habit of constructing textured shelters for pupation like what you've got here. Your find may belong to this group - family Bucculatricidae - although I can't say that for sure. Amazing how many there are on that clump of grass

 

**As a reminder, bags of Black Oil Sunflower Seed from New Brunswick farmer Mike Dickinson can still be ordered by leaving your name and the number of bags you want with Susan Richards by email at susan_richards@rogers.com or telephone 334-0100. Price is $17 for a 15 kg bag and delivery is expected in November.

 

 

 Nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

 

WILSON'S SNIPE. OCT 9, 2021. CATHY SIMON

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER. OCT. 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER. OCT. 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER. OCT. 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER. OCT. 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

GADWALL (MALE). OCT 10, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

AMERICAN WIGEON. OCT 10, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

CANADA GEESE. OCT 10, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

EASTERN BLUEBIRD. OCT , 2021. VICKY McKNIGHT

EASTERN BLUEBIRDS. OCT 10, 2021. LOIS BUDD

GREATER YELLOWLEGS. OCT 10, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

AUTUMN MEADOWHAWK. OCT 10, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

AUTUMN MEADOWHAWK. OCT 10, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

SHADOW DARNER (FEMALE). OCT. 09, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

HONEY MUSHROOM SHOWING ELIZABETHAN COLLAR PARTIAL VEIL.  OCT. 09, 2021., BRIAN STONE

HONEY MUSHROOMS.  OCT. 09, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

SCARLET WAXY CAP MUSHROOM. OCT. 09, 2021. BRIAN STONE

CLINTONIA AKA BLUEBEAD LILY. OCT. 09, 2021. BRIAN STONE

HOBBLEBUSH. OCT. 09, 2021.. BRIAN STONE

RED MAPLE. OCT. 09, 2021. BRIAN STONE

MOTH COCOON AND PUPAL CASE ON LEAF. OCT. 03, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

MOTH COCOON AND PUPAL CASE ON LEAF. OCT. 03, 2021.  BRIAN STONE

MOTH COCOONS ON GRASS. OCT. 03, 2021. BRIAN STONE