Sunday, 19 June 2022

June19 2022

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

June 19, 2022 (Sunday)

 

 

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

 

**A heads up on Nature Moncton June meeting this coming Tuesday night, June 21. The presentation will be on moths by Jim Edsall and Jim will be at the Mapleton Rotary Lodge in person. The presentation will also be available virtually but many may want to come directly to the Lodge to speak with Jim in person. Jim was a long-time member of Nature Moncton before moving to Dartmouth and seeing him again in person along with his amazing knowledge of moths will be a treat. The write up for the presentation is below:

Nature Moncton June Meeting

Tuesday evening, June 21 at 7:00 PM

Mapleton Park Rotary Pavilion

The World of New Brunswick Moths

Speaker: Jim Edsall

 

June is that time of year when many of the beautiful creatures of the night, particularly moths, get their seasonal missions underway.

We have hundreds of moth species resident to New Brunswick. Some may be small and drab, but many are strikingly beautiful, both large (very) and small.  And moths are extremely important pollinators for many of our plant community.

When it comes to identifying moths, Jim Edsall is one of the top experts and Jim will join us on Tuesday, June 21, to share with us how to attract these creatures of the night to our yards, where to find them away from our yards, and some helpful ways to identify them.

This presentation will take place at the Rotary Pavilion of Mapleton Park but will be live streamed virtually as well for those who cannot participate in person.

Let’s all go on the night shift to fly with the moths!

Jim Edsall will be at the Mapleton Rotary Lodge to give the presentation in person but those unable to attend can join virtually at the highlighted link Join our Cloud HD Video Meeting

All are welcome, Nature Moncton member or not.

 

 

 

**This summer Nature Moncton will be having weekly walks again but they will be on Wednesdays.  The first will be held on Wednesday June 22, 2022, at 6:00 PM and will be along the Riverfront Trail in Riverview and led by Fred Richards.  We will meet at the pavilion just down the river from the Chocolate River Station.  The walk will be along the Riverfront to the park beside the new bridge and then back.  This will be a total of 1.2 km. on good gravel and boardwalk.  The Tidal Bore should be coming along about the time we start so you might want to be a few minutes early as the Bore timing can vary a little.  While the Tidal Bore is the main event, I think you might be pleasantly surprised by the variety of things to look at, even in the City.  These walks are free to members and $2.00 for non members.  Fred hopes to see some of you there.

 

**Word got out on Wednesday evening that a WOOD STORK had been spotted in New Harbour, Nova Scotia and had been around for a few days according to Stephen Flemming who spotted the bird. Naturally (!) our own Andrew Darcy had to go on a road trip to see him.

He had missed one at Pt. Pelee in Ontario about five years ago, and have always wanted to see this species in Canada. They are fairly abundant in Southern United States, but not so much the case this far north. 

This is a first confirmed record for Nova Scotia for this species, although there is a potential historical record from Brier Island. Quite an amazing find and fantastic bird for the Maritimes. Andrew spent the day watching the bird forage and move around the causeway for most of the day and had some great views! Well worth the drive and it was a lifer for him.  Andrew includes some videos to get a look at the foraging and some very interesting video of a pair of Willet who had babies, divebombing the stork! The stork was not impressed and would snap at them when they approached too close. Andrew comments he wouldn’t want to get stuck in that bill if he were them. 

 

VIDEO OF WILLET DIVEBOMBING STORK

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/3cw8rrsgy357vqg/DSC_9357.MOV?dl=0

 

VIDEO OF STORK FORAGING

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/j7wu6kkimn8roiz/20220616_175433.mp4?dl=0

 

VIDEO OF STORK

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/evx1zdx5ny8bvzw/20220616_175048.mp4?dl=0

 

A Wood Stork visited Musquash Marsh near Saint John many years ago that many New Brunswickers were lucky enough to have an audience with. I am not aware of any that have visited since then unless this one decides to take a little side trip. Andrew’s beautiful photos will have us ready!
Thank you for sharing your day with us Andrew. The photos and videos are almost as good as being there.
 
**Lisa Morris spotted  green worms in salt water in the Richibucto River recently. At first, she thought it was a baby Eel and picked it up to photograph but it was feather light and flat (vs a round eel or snake body) and immediately broke in two… with both pieces seemingly swimming away. There were three in total with feathery sides (similar to a centipede). Lisa had never seen these before in the river (but not always walking in it in early May). They were approximately 6-12 inches in length and have stumped us as to what they were until a consult with Alyre Chiasson.
 
Alyre comments “This is not a leech but a Polychaete worm because each body segment has a pair of bristles, technically know as parapoda. Leeches do not have them. However, freshwater polychaetes are limited to only about 50 species world-wide and none that Alyre could find inhabit our region. However, some are brackish water tolerant, like members of the family Nereididae, which we do have in NB. Perhaps this one was seen in the lower reaches of the river within tidal influence.”
Lisa’s curiosity made for an interesting finding.

 

 

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 

                                                                                           

  

                                                                                           

POLYCHAETE WORM, JUNE 14, 2022. LISA MORRIS

POLYCHAETE WORM, JUNE 14, 2022. LISA MORRIS

WOOD STORK. JUNE 16, 2022.  ANDREW DARCY

WOOD STORK. JUNE 16, 2022.  ANDREW DARCY

WOOD STORK. JUNE 16, 2022.  ANDREW DARCY

WOOD STORK. JUNE 16, 2022.  ANDREW DARCY

WOOD STORK. JUNE 16, 2022.  ANDREW DARCY

WOOD STORK. JUNE 16, 2022.  ANDREW DARCY

WOOD STORK. JUNE 16, 2022.  ANDREW DARCY

WOOD STORK. JUNE 16, 2022.  ANDREW DARCY

WOOD STORK. JUNE 16, 2022.  ANDREW DARCY

WOOD STORK. JUNE 16, 2022.  ANDREW DARCY