Sunday, 11 February 2018

Feb 11 2018

 
 
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, Feb.11, 2018 (Sunday)
 
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
   Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.
 
For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com
 
 
 
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt@mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
 
 
**    Dave Christie leaves an update on bird activity in the Mary’s Point - Harvey Bank area. The GOLDEN-CROWNED SPARROW [Bruant à couronne dorée] that so many of us were lucky to have an audience with at the Wentzells’ is still coming there but is harder to see as it now has a tendency to stay more in the bushes than out in an open area. Possibly a raptor has made it more wary.
 
    John Inman at 225 Mary’s Point Road has had a fourth RUSTY BLACKBIRD [Quiscale rouilleux] join the three that have been with him all winter. John still has his RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER [Pic à ventre roux] as a regular patron. A new visitor for John was a FOX SPARROW [Bruant fauve] on Saturday.
 
    On Friday Dave noted a flock of 20 CEDAR WAXWINGS [Jaseur d'Amérique] moving about the Harvey Bank area, and on Saturday he watched as an adult BALD EAGLE [Pygargue à tête blanche] fed on a RING-NECKED PHEASANT [Faisan de Colchide] that it had either captured or collected as road kill and taken to a large poplar to dine, under the watchful eyes of two COMMON CROWS [Corneille d'Amérique] who waited for morsels to drop to the ground and then make a dive for the booty.
 
    Dave comments that DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoisé] in his feeder yard reached a new high for this winter on Saturday, when 60 were feeding on the ground, while AM. TREE SPARROWS [Bruant hudsonien] stayed at a consistent 15.
 
**   Daryl Doucette spotted a flock of  WAXWINGS  moving about the Jones Lake area on Thursday. This flock seems to be swelling in size and is moving about widely.
 
**   Patty McCarthy, a new member of Nature Moncton, shares some interesting photos of a male SCARLET TANAGER [Piranga écarlate] that came to her yard to feed on a suet block on June 2, 2017. It stayed for approximately a week and often arrived in the 5 to 6 p.m. time window to feed. She was not aware of the Info Line at the time, so word did not go around then. The adult male Scarlet Tanager surely is a sharply dressed, bright bird in June, one we don’t often see in New Brunswick, yet the range map shows that it occurs in most of the province, and part of Nova Scotia is included.
 
 
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
 
SCARLET TANAGER (MALE) JUNE 2, 2017.  PATTY McCARTHY

SCARLET TANAGER (MALE) JUNE 2, 2017.  PATTY McCARTHY

SCARLET TANAGER (MALE) JUNE 2, 2017.  PATTY McCARTHY

SCARLET TANAGER (MALE) JUNE 2, 2017.  PATTY McCARTHY