Monday, 12 February 2018

Feb 12 2018

 
 
NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, Feb. 12, 2018 (Monday)
 

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt@mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
 
 
**   Yolande LeBlanc reports the CLAY-COLORED SPARROW [Bruant des plaines] continued to be present on Sunday at her 251 Central Street, Memramcook home. Although I’ve had no direct reports, second-hand reports indicate that the other Clay-colored Sparrow is still present at Jules Cormier's feeder yard nearby.
 
**    Clarence Cormier had a pleasant arrival and an unfortunate departure at his Grande-Digue feeder yard this past week. A NORTHERN MOCKINGBIRD [Moqueur polyglotte] suddenly appeared mid-week and was helping itself to some feeder offerings and the still-abundant berries, when it unfortunately fell prey to an immature NORTHERN GOSHAWK [Autour des palombes] on Saturday. We seem to have had fewer reports of Mockingbirds this winter and it’s disappointing to hear of a lost one.
 
**    Brian Coyle was out in the fresh snow of Sunday morning and noted WEASEL [belette], RED SQUIRREL [Écureuil roux], RUFFED GROUSE [Gélinotte huppée], SNOWSHOE HARE [Lièvre d'Amérique], COYOTE [Coyote] and AM. CROW [Corneille d'Amérique] tracks. Note that the weasel track shows the five toe pads nicely. They usually don’t show that well.  He also noted a lot of SNOW FLEAS [collembole nivicole (puce des neiges)] in one area. It seems early but the warm weather must be bringing them out. We are more used to seeing them in the granular, corn snow of March. Snow fleas are usually black, looking like pepper on the snow, as these are. However, they occasionally come in different colours. Fred Dubé had some a few years ago that were coral in colour, and the literature says that they can be in various colours. I’m not sure of the reason for that.
 
    Brian also comments that his yard AMERICAN GOLDFINCHES [Chardonneret jaune] are beginning to brighten in preparation for spring breeding plumage. He suspects that he lost his faithful female YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER [Paruline à croupion jaune] to a predator, as he found some tell-tale feather remains, with a BLUE JAY [Geai bleu] also a recent victim.
 
 
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
 
 
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH.FEB 10 2018. BRIAN COYLE

SNOW FLEA.FEB 10 2018. BRIAN COYLE

SNOW FLEAS.FEB 10 2018. BRIAN COYLE

WEASEL TRACK.FEB 10 2018. BRIAN COYLE