Monday, 19 March 2018

March 19 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, Mar. 19, 2018 (Monday)
To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
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For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at www.naturemoncton.com
Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: David Christie maryspt@mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
 **    Dan Hicks leaves some interesting activity around his home on Elmwood Drive in the area past Royal Oaks subdivision. He has a pond on his property and a wooded area; HOODED MERGANSERS have appeared there a few times during the past week. A few solo males and some bonded pairs, as well as two pairs of MALLARD [Canard colvert] ducks. A core group of three WHITE-TAILED DEER [Cerf de Virginie] have been around a field behind him and recently have been joined by three to five more, from time to time. A female RED FOX [Renard roux] has been in her den area, so he’s hoping to see some family activity in a few months. On Sunday, a MINK [Vison d'Amérique] came right up to their home to create quite a fuss with the whole family rushing to windows for a look. At his feeders he's getting lots of DARK-EYED JUNCOS [Junco ardoisé], AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune], BLUE JAYS [Geai bleu] and both DOWNY [Pic mineur] and HAIRY WOODPECKERS [Pic chevelu]. Interesting to note that this is all within city limits.
**   There’s a high population of RED FOX [Renard roux] on Prince Edward Island. Some very revealing studies have been done on urban foxes, especially in the City of Charlottetown. Many have adapted to urban living with success. John Massey shares a photo that a friend of his, who lives on P.E.I, sent to him of a yard fox patron, looking happy, healthy and comfortable.
**  Brian Stone captured an awesome evening line-up of the planets MERCURY [Mercure] and VENUS [Vénus] and the crescent MOON [Lune] at 8:01 on Sunday evening. It was a clear night and the heavenly bodies cooperating.
**  A fish carcass at the Caissie Cape wharf on Saturday during the Nature Moncton field trip gained folks’ attention as to what species it might be. It was definitely after its best before date and some gulls had been doing some “research” to show that it was a female fish laden with a ripe egg cargo. It appeared to be an ATLANTIC COD [Morue franche]. Don McAlpine agreed, noting the colour, shape and arrangement of fins, and mouth size were consistent with that species. It was approximately 30 cm in length. Some unappetizing photos are attached.Note the barbel under the lower lip to suggest a bottom dwelling species. One would have to wonder how it got on the wharf. There can’t be any fishing boats out there at the moment. Brian Stone’s photo of it had a bit of makeup applied.
**  I have also have had a PURPLE FINCH [Roselin pourpré] arrive at my Moncton feeder yard. After a day of exploring it found the sunflower chips and how to access them, and now that’s its only choice. It appears to be a female, but immature males don’t take on the adult plumage until their second fall. HOUSE FINCH [Roselin familier] are regulars. I’m hoping to get a chance for two females together for comparison. The female House Finch has no superciliary line over the eye and is more conservatively attired.
**   Again, a reminder of tomorrow’s Nature Moncton meeting, with a write-up repeated below. A value added bonus will be Adam Cheeseman from Nature New Brunswick in the second half, and Mike Plourde on the use of trail cameras and photos.
Nature Moncton March Meeting
Date:  March  20, 2018
Time: 7:00 pm
Location:  Mapleton Park Rotary Lodge (across from Cabela’s)
Speaker: Laura Tranquilla
 Wetlands provide a vast array of ecosystem services. Unfortunately, wetlands have been rapidly declining in number, size, and quality throughout North America. Those that remain are threatened by pollution, filling, draining, and other human impacts. Many marsh-dependent species have been affected, and are in need of monitoring, protection, and recovery efforts.
In Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, and Prince Edward Island, conservation organizations have secured and stewarded close to 940,000 hectares of wetland habitat! However, valuation of wetland conservation in terms of hectares says little about the biodiversity and functions these wetlands provide. To fill this gap, Bird Studies Canada, with support from partners, launched the Maritimes Marsh Monitoring Program in 2012.
Join Bird Studies Canada Atlantic Program Manager, Laura Tranquilla as she talks about the Maritimes Marsh Monitoring Program’s efforts to date, directions for the future, and ways to participate.
For more information on Bird Studies Canada’s Maritimes Marsh Monitoring Program please visit:  www.birdscanada.org/volunteer/acmmp/
Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
COD(SPAWN FILLED).MARCH 17, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

COD.MARCH 17, 2018.BRIAN STONE 

COD.MARCH 17, 2018.NELSON POIRIER 

COD.MARCH 17, 2018.NELSON POIRIER 

MERCURY ._ VENUS ._ SLIM CRESCENT MOON. MAR. 18, 2018.  BRIAN STONE

MERCURY ._ VENUS ._ SLIM CRESCENT MOON. MAR. 18, 2018.  BRIAN STONE

PURPLE FINCH.(FEMALE).MARCH 18, 2018.NELSON POIRIER 

PURPLE FINCH.(FEMALE).MARCH 18, 2018.NELSON POIRIER 

RED FOX.MARCH 18, 2018.VIA JOHN MASSEY