Friday, 4 May 2018

May 4 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, May 04, 2018 ( Friday )
 To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, nelson@nb.sympatico.ca . Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website atwww.naturemoncton.com .

 Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Judy Marsh marshj@nbnet.nb.ca
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)
A very big welcome to our new addition to the team that transcribes this Line daily. Judy Marsh has joined today. Catherine Johnson has gone into semiretirement after many long years of devoted service. Catherine has kindly offered to stay on as a spare when needed. Many thanks to Catherine and welcome Judy.

 ** Georges Brun has some nice observations to share. He got a photo of two adult breeding plumage BONAPARTE’S GULLS (Mouette de Bonaparte) at the mouth of Hall’s Creek and was fortunate enough to have an adult ICELAND GULL (Goeland arctigue) pose close by them to show how small these BONAPARTE’S GULLS (Mouette de Bonaparte) are at approximately 13 1/2 inches verses the ICELAND GULL (Goeland arctigue) at a 22 inch average.
  We don’t tend to think of a MALLARD duck (Canard colvert) as a fish eater (piscavore). However, Georges captured a photo of a MALLLARD (Canard colvert) enjoying, what is suspected to be a SMELT ( Eperlan), which should be running in the Petitcodiac River at the moment. He also saw a BALD EAGLE (Pygargue a tete blanche) and a GULL each get what appeared to be a WHITE SUCKER from Jones Lake. With Jones Lake full and a modern new control structure in place to make dry downs unnecessary, the fish presence may become more abundant to attract more fish eating wildlife. Georges also comments, the open control structures at the Causeway seem to be changing the activity in the river area and obviously there is more to come.


** GREATER YELLOWLEGS (Grand chevalier) have appeared at Hay Island. Aldo Dorio got some photos of four of them on Thursday. Note the longer bill, greater than the length of the head (1 ½ times) to distinguish them from LESSER YELLOWLEGS (Petit chevalier) and the heavy barring on the flanks and chest of the GREATER YELLOWLEGS (Grand Chevalier). Most will be on route to breed to the north of us.


** Roger LeBlanc is having even more interesting visitors to his nest boxes. He has twenty-two swallow boxes up and around his Notre Dame property. A pair of EASTERN BLUEBIRDS (Merlebleu de l’Est) arrived on Thursday, so Roger is hoping one of the 22 will meet their standards. Also, Roger’s NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL (Petite nyctale) occupied box has a trail camera appropriately placed to not bother the patrons. We may potentially see some very interesting photos to come over the next few months.

** Brian Stone made a second search of turtles in the Dartmouth area. In yesterdays edition, Brian had photographed some domestic pet store Red-eared Sliders that had been released. Considering the time of year, it could be assumed that they have over wintered, which is unfortunate to hear as they could readily compete with the native turtles. On Thursday, Brian got some native Painted Turtles (Tortue peinte) at Shubie Park in Dartmouth. He got some nice photos to show the red patches on the side of the carapace. And the lack of red in the cheek area with the painted Turtle (Tortue peinte) we hopefully could be seeing soon at that famous Lower Jemseg pond, when the water recedes, which looks like it could be awhile.
Brian also got a pair of ducks, a male Mallard(Canard colvert) and a female Black Duck(canard noir) that were in very close company. So, hybridization could be on the agenda. He also got what appears to be a Red-berried Elder burst out in leaf, which is one that does so early.

**Pat and I visited the Rendell residence in Millerton, near Miramichi on Thursday at 4:30 PM. The Red-headed Woodpecker(Pic a tete rouge) was there. It gave us a brief observation, but did not come back. It is interesting how this bird is hanging in that location, at this time of year. Often spring visits are very brief, where as when immatures stop by in late fall, they’ll often linger at a single feeder yard all winter. Its stop was too brief for photos.

** This weeks Sky at a Glance is included in this edition courtesy of Curt Nason.
This Week’s Sky at a Glance, May 5 - May 12

I was fascinated by the movie Hercules, starring bodybuilder Steve
Reeves, which I saw one Saturday afternoon at the Vogue theatre in
McAdam sometime in the early 60s. I was nurturing my interest in the sky
at that time so the constellation of Hercules has long been a part of my
life. These spring evenings it is in the east as twilight fades.

Look for a keystone asterism one third of the way from the bright star
Vega toward equally bright Arcturus; that is the upside-down body of the
legendary strongman. Hercules is usually depicted down on his right
knee, with his left foot on the head of Draco the Dragon and his head
close to that of Ophiuchus. Originally the constellation was called The
Kneeler, and the star at his head is called Rasalgethi for “head of the
kneeler.” It is the alpha star of the constellation, although
Kornephoros (the club bearer) is brighter. The "head star" of Ophiuchus
is called Rasalhague.

With binoculars you can pick out two globular clusters from the Messier
catalogue in Hercules. Globular clusters are ancient compact groups of
typically tens-to-hundreds of thousands of stars that orbit our galaxy’s
core. One third of the way from the top right star of the Keystone to
the bottom right star is M13, the finest globular cluster in the
northern hemisphere. A line from the bottom right star through the
middle of the top of the Keystone, and extended about an equal distance,
will put you in the area of M92, one of the oldest objects in our area
of the galaxy at more than 13 billion years.

This Week in the Solar System

Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 5:59 am and sunset will occur at
8:32 pm, giving 14 hours, 33 minutes of daylight (6:07 am and 8:35 pm in
Saint John). Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 5:50 am and set at 8:41
pm, giving 14 hours, 51 minutes of daylight (5:57 am and 8:43 pm in
Saint John).

The Moon is near Mars on Sunday morning and is at third quarter on
Monday. Jupiter takes the solar system spotlight this week, reaching
opposition on Tuesday evening when it rises at sunset. A small scope
will show its moon Io disappearing behind the planet shortly after 9 pm
that evening and emerging from the other side two hours and ten minutes
later. Venus balances Jupiter’s rise by outshining it in the west.
Mercury might be spotted with binoculars and luck a half hour before
sunrise. Saturn and Mars offer great viewing in the morning sky, with
Mars brightening every week. The Eta Aquariid meteor shower, one of two
showers arising from Halley’s Comet, peaks this weekend although it is
seen better from the southern hemisphere.

The Saint John Astronomy Club meets in the Rockwood Park Interpretation
Centre this Saturday at 7 pm, and the William Brydone Jack Astronomy
Club meets in the UNB Forestry / Earth Sciences building in Fredericton
on Tuesday at 7 pm. All are welcome.

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at
nasonc@nbnet.nb.

Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
BALD EAGLE (IMMATURE) APR 26 2018 GEORGES BRUN 

BONAPARTE GULLS MAY 3 2018 GEORGES BRUN

GREATER YELLOWLEGS. MAY 3, 2018. ALDO DORIO

GREATER YELLOWLEGS. MAY 3, 2018. ALDO DORIO

GULL WITH FISH  MAY 2 2018 GEORGES BRUN

Hercules

ICELAND AND BONAPARTE GULL MAY 3 2018 GEORGES BRUN 

MALLARD AND BLACK DUCK. MAY 03, 2018. BRIAN STONE

MALLARD DUCK AND FISH PREY APR 30 2018 GEORGES BRUN 

PAINTED TURTLE. MAY 03, 2018. BRIAN STONE

PAINTED TURTLES. MAY 03, 2018. BRIAN STONE

No comments:

Post a Comment