Saturday, 5 May 2018

May 5 2018

Nature Moncton Information Line May 5, 2018 (Saturday)


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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**David Cannon, who had not yet uncovered their yard swimming pool, had two guests swimming happily in the pool edge that was open, a pair of WOOD DUCKS [Canard branchu]. After their dip, they sat in a tree nearby. David often gets visits from local Salamanders [Salamandre] as well, which suspect will be happening soon. Having a swimming pool with woods near at hand brings on some interesting visitors.

**Gabriel Gallant was watching a KILLDEER [Pluvier kildir] in a neighbour’s pasture in Sainte-Marie-de-Kent on Friday when he noted another bird hunkered down to avoid detection, which turned out to be a WILSON'S SNIPE [Bécassine de Wilson]. Gabriel zoomed in for an excellent photo of the Snipe’s detection-avoidance tactic. It surely works, as there are lots of Wilson’s Snipe around, yet we don’t get to see many. He knew some were around, as he has heard one winnowing each morning for at least a week. Gabriel also had his first GRAY CATBIRD [Moqueur chat] and HERMIT THRUSH [Grive solitaire] of the season near his home on Friday.

**Judy Marsh comments that April showers bring on May flowers, and to establish the undisputable proof of folklore, she found MAYFLOWERS [Fleur de Mai] blooming along the railway track where it crosses the Shediac Road on Friday.

**Clarence Cormier reports from his Grande-Digue yard that his first YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER [Paruline à croupion jaune] appeared on Friday on schedule with last year. Since April 27th, Clarence comments the RUBY-CROWNED KINGLETS [Roitelet à couronne rubis] are surprisingly numerous. He still has 7-10 AMERICAN TREE SPARROWS [Bruant hudsonien] which he expects will have flight plans filed north very soon. He has three WHITE-THROATED SPARROWS [Bruant à gorge blanche], two of which are the tan head-stripe version. Two Savannah sparrows, one FOX SPARROW [Bruant fauve], and numerous SONG SPARROWS, but he’s still waiting for his first CHIPPING SPARROW [Bruant familier] and WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW [Bruant à couronne blanche], both of which are late from his records. A flock of 20 CEDAR WAXWINGS [Jaseur d'Amérique] are still appearing, foraging on overwintering berries, most of which are now on the ground.

**Aldo Dorio added WILLET [Chevalier semipalmé] arrival to Hay Island, to join the GREATER YELLOWLEGS [Grand Chevalier] on Friday. One seems to be having a good yawn after its return flight. Many Willet arriving now will be remaining in New Brunswick to complete their summer agenda.

**Krista Doyle shares a photo of some female PUSSY WILLOW [Saule à chatons] blooms that have burst at her Lewis Mountain home. The yellow male catkin blooms are on separate bushes (dioecious).

**Brian Stone photographed a GREATER YELLOWLEGS [Grand Chevalier] at McCormacks Beach at Eastern Passage just outside Dartmouth on Friday. It shows the features nicely that were mentioned yesterday with Aldo Dorio’s Greater Yellowlegs photos. Brian comments this bird was alone.

**Being in the right place at the right time with a camera can sure be rewarding. A male SPRUCE GROUSE [Tétras du Canada] sauntered by me while I was fishing on Friday, to go about his business, ignoring me, to allow for some great photo ops and a short video. Check out the video at the attached link.



 I briefly played a mobbing tape while fishing on Friday, and the wave of YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLERS [Paruline à croupion jaune] that arrived to check it out was surprising, far outnumbering the BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES [Mésange à tête noire] and RED-BREASTED NUTHATCHES [Sittelle à poitrine rousse] that usually respond. They seemed mostly male. One sat still for possibly two seconds to get a photo that really shows off that white throat – our only native Wood Warbler with that delineated white throat. It was interesting to take note of the rich green of the patches of LUNG LICHEN [Lobaire pulmonaire] taken on wet days.


Nelson Poirier
Nature Moncton

GREATER YELLOWLEGS. MAY 04, 2018. BRIAN STONE

GREATER YELLOWLEGS. MAY 04, 2018. BRIAN STONE

KILLDEER. MAY 4, 2018, GABRIEL  GALLANT

LUNG LICHEN.MAY 3, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

PUSSY WILLOWS BLOOMING (FEMALE CATKINS) MAY 4, 2018.KRISTA DOYLE

SPRUCE GROUSE (MALE) MAY 4, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

SPRUCE GROUSE (MALE) MAY 4, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

SPRUCE GROUSE (MALE) MAY 4, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

TRAILING ARBUTUS AKA MAYFLOWERS. MAY 4, 2018. JUDY MARSH

WILLET AND GREATER YELLOWLEGS.MAY 4, 2018. ALDO DORIO

WILLET.MAY 4, 2018. ALDO DORIO

WILSON'S SNIPE. MAY 4, 2018,  GABRIEL GALLANT

WILSON'S SNIPE. MAY 4, 2018,  GABRIEL GALLANT

WOOD DUCK (MALE) MAY 4, 2018. DAVID CANNON

WOOD DUCKS (PAIR) MAY 4, 2018. DAVID CANNON

YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER. MAY 4, 2018. NELSON POIRIER