Wednesday, 13 June 2018

June 13 2018

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, June 13, 2018 ( Wednesday)
 To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor, 
nelson@nb.sympatico.ca . Please advise if any errors are noted in wording or photo labeling.

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www.naturemoncton.com .
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Edited by: Nelson Poirier  nelson@nb.sympatico.ca
Transcript By:
Info Line #      384-6397 (384-NEWS)

**  Jim Wilson advises on the report of a possible nesting MUTE SWAN in the Shemogue area. If indeed correct it would be very important to get documentation of it to submit to the New Brunswick Bird Records  Committee, as it would be the first known attempt of Mute Swans nesting in New Brunswick. Hopefully, someone can get some documentary photos if it is indeed the case they are nesting. Jim has left some instructions, where to send them, for the attention of the New Brunswick Records Committee. Again to repeat, this was a second hand report and yet to be confirmed.

** Brian Stone visited the Twin Oaks Bog on Tuesday to find some plants in this habitat in peak bloom, including Labrador Tea, Bog Laurel, Cotton Grass and Blue-Eyed Grass. The only butterflies encountered were Canadian Tiger Swallowtail and several Sulphurs. There were lots of PALM WARBLERS [Paruline à couronne rousse]. Bog sites are a favourite habitat of Palm Warblers.  Six-Spotted Tiger Beetles were spotted as well.

On Monday, Annette and Brian Stone and Carol Shea did a round of the area to get a nice observation of both SORA [Marouette de Caroline] and VIRGINIA RAIL [Râle de Virginie] at the Sackville Waterfowl Park, even though evening shadows were coming on. At the Cape Brulé Lagoon, a mother AMERICAN BLACK DUCK [Canard noir] was leading her now surprisingly large ducklings around the fence looking for an opening, which she persevered to find. A TREE SWALLOW [Hirondelle bicolore] pair was contently occuping one of the nest boxes erected there by Nature Sud-Est. At a stop in Petit Cap, 20 GREAT BLUE HERONS [Grand Héron] were in trees at the end of Chemin de L’ile Road. Brian could not get all 20 in a single photo. CANADA GEESE [Bernaches du Canada] with their now large size teenage goslings were about as well as WILLET [Chevalier semipalmé], EASTERN KINGBIRD [Tyran tritri], and a YELLOW WARBLER [Paruline jaune] was gathering one of its favorite nesting materials, last years cattail head material.

** A few years ago, Marc André Villard gave a presentation to Nature Moncton on  research he and a grad student had done on BLACK-BACKED WOODPECKER [Pic à dos noir] and AMERICAN THREE-TOED WOODPECKER [Pic tridactyle] in several cut blocks, in the area near Birch Lake, north of Miramichi. They were surprised to find both species nesting there in snag trees left in the cut block, but foraging in the uincut forest. They felt it may have something to do with less nest predators, such as squirrels in lone snag trees. Larry Sherrard and I went to the area where Marc André had done  his work  on Tuesday, to find it exactly as he had described. He advised us to watch for Woodpeckers going to snag trees to nest holes after they gathered food from the uncut forest edge. We were pretty pumped to find a woodpecker doing just that, feeling that we potentially had one of our target birds. The nest hole was very high in the tree and and a long distance off, We got lots of zoomed in photos, hoping for confirmation. On reviewing the photos we found we had good photos of a HAIRY WOODPECKER [Pic chevelu] pair, not what we had hoped. As the area was exactly as Marc André had described, I feel fairly confident that Black-Backed and American Three-Toed Woodpackers are indeed still there, but more coverage of the area is needed to find them. There were some challanges in getting to the site in good time to search longer, so we abandened it for another day. All thanks to Eric Sullivan, of the Dept. of Natural Resourses in  Miramichi, who gave some great advice on finding the exact location. It is a very big area to find specific spots.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
 
BLACK DUCK AND DUCKLINGS.  JUNE 11, 2018._ BRIAN STONE

BLACK DUCK AND DUCKLINGS.  JUNE 11, 2018._ BRIAN STONE

BLUE-EYED GRASS. JUNE 12, 2018. BRIAN STONE

BOG LAUREL. JUNE 12, 2018._ BRIAN STONE

CANADA GEESE AND GOSLINGS. JUNE 11, 2018. BRIAN STONE

CANADIAN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLY ON LABRADOR TEA. JUNE 12, 2018. BRIAN STONE

COTTON GRASS. JUNE 12, 2018._ BRIAN STONE

EASTERN KINGBIRD. JUNE 11, 2018._ BRIAN STONE

GREAT BLUE HERONS. JUNE 11, 2018. BRIAN STONE

GREAT BLUE HERONS. JUNE 11, 2018. BRIAN STONE

GREEN FROG. JUNE 12, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

HAIRY WOODPECKER (FEMALE). JUNE 12, 2018. NELSON POIRIER 

HAIRY WOODPECKER (MALE). JUNE 12, 2018. NELSON POIRIER 

LABRADOR TEA. JUNE 12, 2018._. BRIAN STONE

PALM WARBLER.  JUNE 12, 2018. BRIAN STONE

PALM WARBLER.  JUNE 12, 2018. BRIAN STONE

SIX-SPOTTED TIGER BEETLE. 01. JUNE 12, 2018. BRIAN STONE

SNAG TREE IN CUT BLOCK. JUNE 12, 2018. NELSON POIRIER

SOLAR HALO ( 22 DEG. ). JUNE 12, 2018. BRIAN STONE

SORA. JUNE 11, 2018. BRIAN STONE

SORA. JUNE 11, 2018. BRIAN STONE

TREE SWALLOW. JUNE 11, 2018. BRIAN STONE

VIRGINIA RAIL. JUNE 11, 2018. BRIAN STONE

WILLET. JUNE 11, 2018. BRIAN STONE

YELLOW WARBLER. JUNE 11, 2018. BRIAN STONE