Tuesday, 24 September 2019

Sept 24 2019




NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, September 24, 2019 (Tuesday)


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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Plans for this coming Saturday’s field trip to the Mapleton Acadia Forest eco reserve are gelling. The meeting time is 12:00 noon in Elgin at the Elgin Eco Park which is right in the town and is well marked and signed. We will be led by Idella, a local historian, meeting her at the Elgin park in her red Toyota and will go from there to the trail head. The trail through the woods is sometimes level and sometimes up and down so wear appropriate footwear and dress for the weather. The drive to Elgin takes approximately 45 minutes to 1 hour. Suggested routes are to take route 895 at Anagance or route 905 at Petitcodiac. Both lead to Elgin, but the route 905 from Petitcodiac may be the preferred one. The hike is approximately 3 hours and then we can head to the Women’s Institute turkey supper nearby for fellowship and chatter and a great home cooked meal. To check out this special nature preserve click on the linked website attached below.
A map is attached with the photos. A contact phone number if anyone is late or loses the group will be 866-2752.


** Dale Gaskin reports lots of bird activity around his downtown Dawson Settlement home. A sizeable flock of CEDAR WAXWINGS [Jaseur d'Amérique] has arrived to feast on a certain mountain ash tree. He is really noting how they attack the top berries first, wondering if maybe the berries at the top of the tree are exposed to the sun longer and might be more mature and so preferred first. Often the robins have them demolished first by now, but this year the cedar waxwings arrived first and there is no sign of robins with them. The mountain ash berry supply appears to be extremely abundant this year. This must make the berry connoisseur birds very content. If the bohemian waxwings and pine grosbeaks arrive later there is a full pantry waiting for them.

 Dale also had a RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD [Colibri à gorge rubis] arrive. It did not feed at a freshly supplied feeder but chose flowering phlox and honeysuckle and it stayed for some time to get its fuel fill. Dale suspects that it is the latest date that he has noted a ruby-throated hummingbird at his site. The EASTERN BLUEBIRDS [Merlebleu de l'Est] are continuing their stay and are still checking out houses just as they would in the spring.

** Jean Renton comments that she heard a SNOWSHOE HARE [Lièvre d’Amérique] on Sunday, something that she has seen few of this year. If the hare population is down it will make it a harder winter for several species that rely heavily on them. I feel that I have noted less snowshoe hare in my travels this year as well. Jean also comments on a NORTHERN HARRIER [Busard des marais] very much still in hunting mode in nearby fields which is to be expected as this species is never in any rush to leave. Jean also appreciated a visit from a small RED-BELLIED SNAKE [Couleuvre à ventre rouge] that she seldom sees.

** Brian Stone did a walk on Sunday along an ATV trail beside the Trans-Canada highway between the Gorge Rd. and Mapleton Rd. to get to an urban beaver pond that he had noted there. As beaver ponds do, it attracted other inhabitants such as large BULLFROGS [Ouaouaron], a nearing retirement NORTHERN CRESCENT BUTERFLY [Croissant nordique], an AMERICAN LADY BUTTERFLY [Vanesse de Virginie] appearing fairly fresh, a few fresh plants of the toadflax group commonly known as BUTTER AND EGGS [beurre et oeufs] in full colourful bloom. Before getting to the trail he stopped where he had found a group of BANDED ARGIOPE SPIDERS [araignée argiope à bandes] in the past. They were very much present, still there and not shy about preparing their prey in front of the camera.
** The few days ahead are the “mushroom rains” so expect lots of them to pop up with the delicious fall moisture arrival. I held a mushroom workshop in Sussex on Monday night and was amazed at the amount participants were able to find even after such a dry week, but the real bonanza would have come later this week.



Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton
AMERICAN LADY BUTTERFLY. SEPT. 22, 2019. BRIAN STONE

BANDED ARGIOPE SPIDER. SEPT. 22, 2019. BRIAN STONE

BANDED ARGIOPE SPIDER. SEPT. 22, 2019. BRIAN STONE

BEAVER LODGE AND POND. SEPT. 22, 2019. BRIAN STONE

ELGIN ECO PARK MAP

DESTROYING ANGEL MUSHROOMS WORKSHOP. SEPT. 23, 2019.  BRIAN STONE

BUTTER AND EGGS (LINARIA VULGARIS). SEPT. 22, 2019. BRIAN STONE

BULLFROG. SEPT. 22, 2019. BRIAN STONE

SALMON MUSHROOM. SEPT. 22, 2019..  BRIAN STONE

MUSHROOM WORKSHOP (GIANT PUFFBALL IN UPPER RIGHT). SEPT. 23, 2019. BRIAN STONE

FLY AGARIC MUSHROOMS FROM WORKSHOP. SEPT. 23, 2019..  BRIAN STONE

FLY AGARIC MUSHROOMS (LEFT) AND ORANGE LATEX MILKY MUSHROOMS (RIGHT) FROM WORKSHOP. SEPT. 23, 2019.. BRIAN STONE

NORTHERN CRESCENT BUTTERFLY. SEPT. 22, 2019. BRIAN STONE