Monday, 9 September 2019

Sept 9 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, September 09, 2019 (Monday)

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: David Christie  maryspt@mac.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

The Osprey is surely a very skilled fisher and fisheraholic. Yves Poussart recently got a photo of an Osprey enjoying a large flounder. Phil Riebel recently captured a photo of a Striped Bass in the talons of an Osprey in the Miramichi area. Striped Bass have come back from a listed species in New Brunswick to relative abundance following over 10 years of protection from the Department of Fisheries and Oceans. The Osprey must be very content with that as well as Bald Eagles and other bird and mammal fish connoisseurs. The Striped Bass Phil Riebel's photo shows surely is a great sized meal for the Osprey's family.

Phil also got a great photo of a COMMON Tern with a Sand Lance in its bill. This tern is from a colony at the southern tip of Portage Island in Miramichi Bay. Phil estimates the breeding colony at that site at approximately 250 and suspects Sand Lance is a very significant food source for them.

A lot of American Goldfinch are coming to a few feeders up and am noting sometimes 80% of those appearing at the feeder are in female plumage. I assume some of these in female plumage are young-of-the-year that are just starting coming to feeders and sure appear awkward around the feeders flitting the wings a lot but not actually begging. I did note a few being fed in nearby trees. American Goldfinch are late in the season breeders. The guides don't seem to show distinct juvenile plumage  to readily distinguish them from adult females.




Brian Stone checked out Mapleton Park on Sunday after the storm had passed. There was no serious damage but Dorian had dropped in to take down some trees, one larger one in the parking lot. The new path being built got washed out a fair bit.
A nice group of warblers was moving through the park but Brian was not able to get good photos of them.
A flock of Cedar Waxwings were in a distant tree. Look closely at the photo to seed many have the streaked breasts of young-of-the-year birds. A Great Blue Heron was looking not particularly impressed with things. A white Admiral Butterfly appeared to be nearing the end of its tenure. A Woolly Bear caterpillar was travelling briskly with water droplets still to be shed.  Brian found some Turtlehead plants in bloom. A close look shows how they got their common name. Wild Raisin were showing some ripening fruit. Birch Polypore mushrooms were working on recycling some retiring Birch trees and Orange Jelly fungus was brightening the base of a Pine tree stump.

Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Nature Moncton


AMERICAN GOLDFINCH. SEPT 8, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

BIRCH POLYPORE MUSHROOMS (OLD AND NEW) SEPT. 08, 2019.. BRIAN STONE

CEDAR WAXWINGS (MANY YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR). SEPT. 08, 2019. BRIAN STONE

COMMON TERN WITH SAND LANCE. SEPT 2019. PHIL RIEBEL

GREAT BLUE HERON. SEPT. 08, 2019. BRIAN STONE

ORANGE JELLY FUNGUS. SEPT. 08, 2019. BRIAN STONE

OSPREY WITH STRIPED BASS PREY. SEPT 2019. PHIL RIEBEL

TURTLEHEAD. SEPT. 08, 2019.  BRIAN STONE

TURTLEHEAD. SEPT. 08, 2019.  BRIAN STONE

WHITE ADMIRAL BUTTERFLY. SEPT. 08, 2019. BRIAN STONE

WILD RAISIN. SEPT. 08, 2019. BRIAN STONE

WOOLLY BEAR CATERPILLAR. SEPT. 08, 2019. BRIAN STONE