Saturday, 5 October 2019

Oct 5 2019


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, 5 October 2019 (Saturday)

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 Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Catherine Clements
Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**The EASTERN BLUEBIRDS [Merlebleu de l'Est] are still doing their fall flocking routine, and doing nest box checks. Jean Renton had a sudden visit from 20+ Eastern Bluebirds to her Stilesville yard on Friday afternoon, to comment it was a very awesome thing to witness. This fall Eastern Bluebird behaviour is becoming more commonly seen, with the pleasantly increasing number of this species successfully nesting in New Brunswick, very likely due to less competitive pressure from the HOUSE SPARROW [Moineau domestique.

**The CEDAR WAXWING [Jaseur d'Amérique] is a late season nester to take advantage of the ripening wild fruit. At the moment it is expected to see the irregular breast striping plumage of the young of the year birds as they flock up. Aldo Dorio tallied 10 young of the year Cedar Waxwings at Hay Island on Friday, and got 3 nice photos from different angles.

**In yesterday’s edition, we were able to feature a STAR-NOSED MOLE [Condylure étoilé] in lots of detail. On Friday evening I came across a lawn with several typical molehills of tailings from underground tunnels created by a Star-nosed Mole. I would expect to see lots more appearing as the days get colder. If you find them on your lawn and would sooner not see them, simply rake the loose earth away. The moles won’t mind a bit as they will be away from the mounds and on other missions important to moles.

**The HEN OF THE WOODS [Polypore en touffe] is a very choice edible Mushroom [Champignon] and should be very easy to recognize. They tend to appear right now, and all October. They normally have a strong preference to be associated with Oak [Chêne] trees. I found my first one of the season streetside, across from MacArthur’s Nursery on McLaughlin Drive on Friday afternoon. It was very fresh, as it was still quite dark in colour. This mushroom is a polypore, with the underside showing the small holes from the pores. The spore print is of little value, but it is relatively easy to recognize. For those who know sites where this species grows, it’s time to do a check-out. The photographed one is not still there, as it went to a local kitchen. However, more could appear at that site.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton



CEDAR WAXWING (YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR) OCT 3, 2019.  ALDO DORIO

CEDAR WAXWING (YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR) OCT 3, 2019.  ALDO DORIO

CEDAR WAXWING (YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR) OCT 3, 2019.  ALDO DORIO

HEN OF THE WOODS MUSHROOM (TOP VIEW). OCT 4, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

HEN OF THE WOODS MUSHROOM (TOP AND UNDERSIDE VIEW). OCT 4, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

HEN OF THE WOODS MUSHROOM (UNDERSIDE). OCT 4, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

STAR-NOSED MOLE EXCAVATION. OCT 3, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

STAR-NOSED MOLE EXCAVATIONS. OCT 3, 2019. NELSON POIRIER