Sunday, 3 November 2019

Nov 3 2019




 NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, November 3, 2019 (Sunday) 


To view the photos mentioned in this edition, go to <http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca>.

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Edited by Nelson Poirier, <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>
Transcript by David Christie, <maryspt@mac.com> 
Info Line #:  506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

                                                               

** CANADA JAYS [Mésangeai du Canada] always seem to be attracted to bread morsels. Louise and Maurice Richard had two of these jays visit their Acadieville cabin on Saturday to enjoy just that.


** Aldo Dorio is still noting a MALLARD [Canard colvert] duck and a NORTHERN PINTAIL [Canard pilet] staying in very close company at Hay Island on Saturday.


** Several Nature Moncton members joined the Chignecto Naturalists’ Club on Saturday for a field trip to the Amherst Point Bird Sanctuary and the John Lusby Marsh, led by Garry Donaldson, manager, wildlife assessment and protected areas, with the Canadian Wildlife Service, to explore the area. The hike started on the old railroad line that served to remove mined gypsum from the area, then along, around wetland areas and forest trails, to see many parts that this large area encompasses. A lot of waterfowl were moving about, but two AMERICAN COOTS [Foulque d’Amérique] were special, as they dodged in and out of sight. The caverns and sinkholes as a result of gypsum deposits were of interest and of special note a 120 year old Maple tree.

There were many AUTUMN MEADOWHAWK [Sympétrum tardif] dragonflies on the wing. One DESTROYING ANGEL [Amanite bisporigère] was found, showing all its features clearly, being all white, a partial veil hanging like an apron, rounded base in a sac, and fee gills to photograph well. Lots of evergreen ferns, very green as expected, and showing the first two lower pinnules on the first pinna, showing nicely as the same length to separate this fern as the Evergreen Wood Fern. A BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE [Mésange à tête noire] enjoyed walnut pieces from the hand, with no feeders anywhere near, and lots more.

A few Queen Anne’s Lace plants were still in full bloom showing the single purple central flower (where Queen Anne left a drop of blood after puncturing a finger knitting lace!) while other plants had matured into their “bird’s nest” shape as they went to seed.
The invasive shrub Glossy Buckthorn was laden with berries at several sites

A brief visit to the John Lusby Marsh across the road, beside the wind turbines, showed the largest contiguous acreage of protected marsh on the Bay of Fundy.

After the field trip, several Nature Moncton members went to visit the Chignecto National Wildlife Area, recently built, to see a variety of expected waterfowl and surprising numbers of MUSKRAT [Rat musqué] lodges. This site is approximately 5 minutes farther down the Southampton Road, from the Amherst Point Bird Sanctuary and is very well marked and a suggested site to visit easily seeing it roadside.

A few others took the opportunity to visit the newly built wetland for water management, on St. James Street, just off Lorne Street in the Town of Sackville. It has been attracting lots of shorebirds and waterfowl, to become a must stop when birding in Sackville. A chance meet-up with Kathy Popma took us to the large area behind the Sackville Public Works Garage, where BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS [Pluvier argenté] and PECTORAL SANDPIPERS [Bécasseau à poitrine cendrée] were present, moving about at scope distance, and AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER [Pluvier bronzé] was a possibility, but the distance was so great we had to leave it as a possibility only. Gilles Belliveau points out one among the many distant photos taken that appears to have a more defined superculium. A smaller bill and a bit more primary extension visible that the many other photos taken but not clear enough to call with certainty with none of the many accompanying Black-bellied Plovers in the same frame for comparison.   


Nelson Poirier   <nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com>   
Nature Moncton






AMERICAN COOTS. NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN GOLDEN PLOVER (POSSIBILITY). NOV 2, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

AMHERST POINT BIRD SANCTUARY FIELD TRIP (LEADER GARRY DONALDSON). NOV. 02, 2019.  BRIAN STONE

AMHERST POINT BIRD SANCTUARY FIELD TRIP. NOV. 02, 2019.  BRIAN STONE

AMHERST POINT BIRD SANCTUARY FIELD TRIP. NOV. 02, 2019.  BRIAN STONE



AUTUMN MEADOWHAWK DRAGONFLY. NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE


AUTUMN MEADOWHAWK DRAGONFLY. NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE

BEAVER TRAIL. NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE

BUFFLEHEAD DUCK (FEMALE). NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE


CANADA JAY. NOV 2, 2019. LOUISE RICHARD

DESTROYING ANGEL MUSHROOM. (COVERED SAC  NOT PEELED AWAY FROM DUG UP BASE). NOV. 02, 2019..  BRIAN STONE

DESTROYING ANGEL MUSHROOM. (HANGING APRON PARTIAL VEIL). NOV. 02, 2019..  BRIAN STONE

DESTROYING ANGEL MUSHROOM. (SAC  PEELED AWAY FROM DUG UP ROUNDED BASE). NOV. 02, 2019..  BRIAN STONE

DESTROYING ANGEL MUSHROOM. (SAC BEING PEELED AWAY FROM DUG UP BASE). NOV. 02, 2019..  BRIAN STONE

EVERGREEN FERN SHOWING FIRST LOWER PINNA AND PINNULES. NOV 2, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

FOSSIL PLANT STEMS. NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE

GLOSSY BUCHKTHORN  SHRUB. NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE

MUSKRAT LODGE. NOV 2, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

NORTHERN PINTAIL (MALE) AND MALLARD DUCK (MALE). NOV 2, 2019. ALDO DORIO

NORTHERN PINTAIL (MALE) AND MALLARD DUCK (MALE). NOV 2, 2019. ALDO DORIO

BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE ENJOYING CHOPPED WALNUTS.NOV. 02, 2019.. BRIAN STONE

QUEEN ANNE'S LACE GOING TO SEED. NOV 2, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

QUEEN ANNE'S LACE IN BLOOM. NOV 2, 2019. NELSON POIRIER

UTILITY WIRE ATTACHMENT TO REDUCE BIRD STRIKES. NOV 2, 2019. NELSON POIRIER
AMHERST POINT BIRD SANCTUARY FIELD TRIP.(GYPSUM DEPOSIT) NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE