Monday, 4 November 2019

Nov 4 2019


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, November 4, 2019 (Monday)


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Edited by Nelson Poirier,
Transcript by David Christie,
Info Line #:  506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)



** Approximately a week ago, Shirley Childs had a bird she was not familiar around around her Wendell St. Riverview, bird feeders for a few days, and it accidentally got inside their framed deck. She got a good observation of it, and her description matches a CAROLINA WREN [Troglodyte de Caroline] perfectly. She has not seen it since. When this species appears at a feeder at this time of year, it often becomes a faithful patron, so it’s definitely a nice bird to watch for in that area. With a relatively mild fall, most feeder yards are fairly quiet with so much natural food available. The first snowfall may change that a lot!


** I’m adding a few more photos from Saturday’s visit to Sackville and the Amherst Point Bird Sanctuary. One of the Amherst Point trails hosts a maple [érable] tree estimated as 120 years of age. A photo is attached.

Also at the new Sackville, Lorne Street / St. James Street impoundment, a photo shows a flock of GREATER YELLOWLEGS [Grand Chevalier] that were loudly expressing their opinion with some quietly resting RING-BILLED GULLS [Goéland à bec cerclé].

Three HOODED MERGANSERS [Harle couronné] were in the pond. The trio appears to be one adult male and two females, showing the yellowish lower mandible of the females. Kathy Popma mentioned that they had been there for several days. It would make one wonder if there are small fish in that pond or are they interested in some other food source.

Brian Stone also got photos of the BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS [Pluvier argenté] and PECTORAL SANDPIPERS [Bécasseau à poitrine cendrée] in the fields behind the Sackville Public Works Garage. We thought a passing, very large manure spreader would end our shorebird observation but it actually got the birds to move from very far away to just far away.

Brian also took a photo of a SPINDLE-SHAPED YELLOW CORAL MUSHROOM at Irishtown Park on Friday looking a bit trampled or munched on. This mushroom was one of a series of four that was a stamp issue from Canada Post some years ago. Also another very large BALD-FACED HORNET’S nest was exposed after leaf fall.



Nelson Poirier     
Nature Moncton


SPINDLE-SHAPED YELLOW CORAL FUNGUS. NOV. 01, 2019. BRIAN STONE

HOODED MERGANSER DUCKS. NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE

HOODED MERGANSER DUCKS (FEMALES). NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE

GREATER YELLOWLEGS AND FRIENDS (LORNE ST. SACKVILLE). NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE

GREATER YELLOWLEGS  (LORNE ST. SACKVILLE). NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE

BLACK-BELLIED PLOVERS AND PECTORAL SANDPIPERS. NOV. 02, 2019.. BRIAN STONE

POOP TRUCK (NOT THE GREY ONE). NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE

MAPLE TREE (120 YEARS OLD). NOV. 02, 2019. BRIAN STONE

BALD-FACED HORNET NEST. NOV. 01, 2019. BRIAN STONE