Wednesday, 6 November 2019

Nov 6 2019


NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, November 6, 2019 (Wednesday)

To view the photos mentioned in this edition go to http://nminfoline.blogspot.ca .

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling. Note that corrections, deletions, or delayed additions may not always appear on the Info Line and email transcript but will always appear on the BlogSpot. For this reason, it is recommended that those wishing to look at historical records use the BlogSpot rather than the email transcript. The BlogSpot can always be accessed from the website.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at 
www.naturemoncton.com .

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Debbie Batog had 2 RUFFED GROUSE [Gélinotte huppée] wander into her McKees Mills yard on Monday. One surveyed the area under her deck until a screaming BLUE JAY [Geai bleu] arrived, which the grouse did not appreciate and they promptly took their leave. Note the fully feathered legs. The bird in Debbie’s photo appears to be one that is molting, assumedly a young of the year bird.

** Wayne Corcoran, near Quarryville, normally has a very lively feeder yard. He reports that it has been a very quiet fall but was pleased to see a pair of EVENING GROSBEAKS [Gros-bec errant] arrive on Monday morning. Wayne has had incredible numbers of evening grosbeaks in winter in recent years.

Lisa Morris recently came across a tree planted on the reconstructed walking path around the oval at Centennial Park. Dan Hicks, Director of Parks and Leisure Operations for the City comments

“This one looks like one of the Redbud trees we planted around there. We also introduced some Dawn Redwood and London Plane trees in the mix as part of our efforts to diversify in preparation for warmer climates. They are on the northern edge of the range bur prevalent in the Carolinian forests. We tried to get Hickory trees but the nurseries did not have any available. We’ll try to get some next year and maybe some Tulip trees


** The AMERICAN WIGEON [Canard d'Amérique] has become a very common member of the waterfowl community in New Brunswick. Jan Tingley comments on seeing 23 American Wigeons on Sunday in the large pond at the foot of the Hillsborough hill. Gordon Rattray spotted a EURASIAN WIGEON [Canard siffleur] near that area a few weeks ago with American Wigeons.

** There have been reports of our winter northern visitors arriving on schedule for their winter vacations in New Brunswick. Jim Saunders came across a flock of SNOW BUNTINGS [Bruant des neiges] near Miramichi on November 03.

** Aldo Dorio is noting that 10 AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique] were enjoying the abundant crop of Mountain Ash berries at his Neguac home on Monday. Dave MacLeod reports that he has had approximately a dozen AMERICAN ROBINS [Merle d'Amérique] strip the berries from 2 trees that were heavily laden with berries in his New Jersey yard, near Neguac, last week. I wonder if the heavy Mountain Ash crop will have more robins overwinter to enjoy the bounty. I recall some years ago, during a heavy crop year, seeing more robins than I have ever seen in one spot loudly harvesting the crop in mid-February near Rockport. 
  

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




SNOW BUNTINGS. NOV 3, 2019. JIM SAUNDERS

RUFFED GROUSE. NOV 5, 2019. DEBIE BATOG

RUFFED GROUSE. NOV 5, 2019. DEBIE BATOG

REDBUD TREE, OCT 30, 2019.  LISA MORRIS

REDBUD TREE, OCT 30, 2019.  LISA MORRIS

AMERICAN ROBIN. NOV 5, 2019. ALDO DORIO

AMERICAN ROBIN. NOV 5, 2019. ALDO DORIO