Thursday, 26 December 2019

Dec 26 2019

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 26, 2019 (Thursday)

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Georges Brun made a brief visit to Moncton’s Landing area on the Petitcodiac River. He did observe 1 PEREGRINE FALCON [Faucon pèlerin] on the big “A” logo at Assumption Place. He watched the area on the Riverview Marsh between the TransAqua outlet and Point Park closely for the Short-eared Owl, but there was no appearance of it. He did photograph a NORTHERN HARRIER [Busard des marais] in that area on December 23rd.

** It’s a good time for track sleuthing as to who was there, especially if the shallow snow is a bit soft to leave a register. Louise Nichols came across a few that caught her eye in woods near a frozen over boggy area by her Aulac home. One set of prints are feline made. Note the lack of nail print, 4 toe pad imprint, and the “C” shaped raised area between the front and hind pads. Canine would be conical in that area. The stride measured 11 in. which could put it in the lower Bobcat range, but a domestic cat has been seen in that area that may be large enough to do that. The second set of prints/trail could be Mink. They often leave one angular print with all 4 paws landing in deeper snow, but clear prints in this case can be consistent with Mink. As Louise comments, tracks rarely appear as clearly as the good guides out show as substrate and snow conditions especially are so variable.

** The Cardwell Farms area in Penobsquis is a very popular area for BALD EAGLES [Pygargue à tête blanche] to overwinter. Folks are not allowed on the actual composting site but roadside stops from the main highway can frequently give good observations. There is also possibilities of other raptors to watch out for and surprise ones have turned up there. Nadia Parisella got a photo of 8 to 11 Bald Eagles perched in trees near the area, but unfortunately the photo could not show well on the blogspot.

** Brian Stone comments that the large troupe of MALLARD DUCKS [Canard colvert] have returned to one of their favourite wintering sites around the creeks at Mapleton Park. It is time to be on the watch for other potential species joining them.

** We’ve tended to have usually 4 BLUE JAYS [Geai bleu] as regular patrons at our Moncton feeder yard, however very suddenly 16 to 20 Blue Jays arrived in a noisy touchdown on Wednesday. They ate well for a time and then were off. The AMERICAN GOLDFINCH [Chardonneret jaune], HOUSE FINCH [Roselin familier], SPARROWS, and BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEES [Mésange à tête noire] were not amused and seemed quite happy to wave a wing goodbye and get back to their Christmas breakfast.


Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton





MINK TRACKS-TRAIL SUSPECTED. DEC. 25, 2019. LOUISE NICHOLS

MINK TRACKS SUSPECTED. DEC. 25, 2019. LOUISE NICHOLS

TRACKS (FELINE). DEC. 25, 2019.  LOUISE NICHOLS

TRACKS (FELINE). DEC. 25, 2019.  LOUISE NICHOLS

PEREGRINE FALCON. DEC 25, 2019. GEORGES BRUN

NORTHERN HARRIER. DEC 23, 2019. GEORGES BRUN
MALLARD DUCKS. DEC. 21, 2019.  BRIAN STONE

MALLARD DUCKS. DEC. 21, 2019.  BRIAN STONE

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