Tuesday, 24 March 2020

March 24 2020

 NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, March 24, 2020 (Tuesday)

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: david.cannon@rogers.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


** Anita and David Cannon have three of Roger LeBlanc’s SAW-WHET OWL boxes up on their off-Ammon Road wooded property. They were checking them Monday; two of them were empty, but one of them was well-filled with OLD MAN’S BEARD LICHEN. There was a 4 inch cavity in the center of the nest, running 5 inches deep. The nest was very clean, with no evidence of feathers, hair or food remnants. A DEER MOUSE could be a possible candidate. The nest was carefully replaced after examination. Their comment, “It looked very cozy”.

** We’ve seen few BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS [Jaseur boréal] this year, so it was a real surprise for Louise Nichols to come across a flock of 18 Bohemian Waxwings in Port Elgin on Monday and it is nearly the end of March! Louise also came across a male PILEATED WOODPECKER [Grand pic] excavating a large hole in a snag and then the female showed up to take over. The hole is round; this could well be the nest site being selected. They allowed nice photos much more interested in their mission than the photographer.

It is that time of year when we are much more apt to see BOBCATS moving about during the day. The mother cats that have kept their young with them since birth in the spring are coming into estrus and abruptly advising their coddled young it’s time to go on their own to lead to some hungry teenagers learning to fend for themselves. Therese and Jim Carroll encountered a Bobcat on the side of Duck Pond Road in Gardener Creek on Monday. At first it was just sitting there momentarily distracted by them. Its focus apparently was on a couple of chattering Red Squirrels across the road. They stopped their car and its attention reverted to the squirrels. They then observed its motion across the road that looked like the Bobcat was missing its hind legs being in a crouching position ready for the pounce. Jim got a few photos of the youngster honing its hunting tactics.
Note the bobtail tip in a few of Jim’s photos showing the tip with black top and white under. The tail tip of a Lynx would be solid black. Also the paws would be much larger in the Lynx. We are much more likely to see a Bobcat in southern NB than a Lynx.

**Jane LeBlanc observed a pair of TURKEY VULTURES [Urubu à tête rouge] gliding over St. Martins on Monday. This species has become a very common species soaring across New Brunswick’s skies over the past years. Their graceful flight is a joy to watch.

** Brian and Annette Stone checked out  Mapleton Park area on Monday. Anette spotted an AMERICAN ROBIN [Merle d'Amérique] with unexpected white areas in the head area to make it a partial albino.  Brian attaches a regular robin photo for comparison. We tend to see partial albino and leucistic robins every spring. I am not sure whether this species is more prone to albinism, or if there simply are more robins than many species.
They also took note of buds that were swelling on a tree that had opposite branching, which suggests Maple or Ash. I think that by default it is a RED MAPLE as they are among the first to bud out in the spring.
 A pair of CANADA GEESE [Bernaches du Canada] seemed to be standing on the water-covered ice, waiting for it to thaw. A lone male HOODED MERGANSER [Harle couronné] is tending to stay around the creek but it tends to be very wary.
Brian got a photo of a Mallard Duck hybrid and a regular male side by side for comparison.
An egg sized nest from last summer was noted to be in good condition. A warbler possibility? Comments on the possible former owner are welcomed.

Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton




BOBCAT. MARCH 23, 2020. JIM CARROLL

BOBCAT. MARCH 23, 2020. JIM CARROLL

BOBCAT. MARCH 23, 2020. JIM CARROLL

BOBCAT. MARCH 23, 2020. JIM CARROLL

PILEATED WOODPECKER (MALE). MARCH 23, 2020. LOUISE NICHOLS
PILEATED WOODPECKER (MALE). MARCH 23, 2020. LOUISE NICHOLS

PILEATED WOODPECKER ( FEMALE). MARCH 23, 2020. LOUISE NICHOLS

BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS. MARCH 23, 2020. LOUISE NICHOLS

BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS. MARCH 23, 2020. LOUISE NICHOLS

BOHEMIAN WAXWINGS. MARCH 23, 2020. LOUISE NICHOLS

AMERICAN ROBIN (PARTIAL ALBINO). MAR. 23, 2020.  BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN ROBIN (PARTIAL ALBINO). MAR. 23, 2020.  BRIAN STONE

AMERICAN ROBIN. MAR. 23, 2020.  BRIAN STONE

NORTHERN SAW-WHET OWL NEST BOX. MARCH 23, 2020. DAVID CANNON

RED MAPLE BUDS. MAR. 23, 2020. BRIAN STONE

HOODED MERGANSER (MALE). MAR. 23, 2020. BRIAN STONE

TURKEY VULTURE. MAR. 23, 2020. JANE LEBLANC

MALLARD DUCKS-MALE (HYBRID AND REGULAR). MAR. 23, 2020..  BRIAN STONE

CANADA GEESE. MAR. 23, 2020. BRIAN STONE

ICE. MAR. 23, 2020. BRIAN STONE

SOLAR HALO (22 DEG.). MAR. 23, 2020. BRIAN STONE

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