Thursday, 10 June 2021

June 10 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, June 10, 2021 (Thursday)  

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


 For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Brian Stone bjpstone@gmail.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 

** Jane Leblanc certainly had some very special visitors to her St. Martins yard on Wednesday. A female MONARCH BUTTERFLY [Monarque] arrived and immediately went to her young COMMON MILKWEED [Asclépiade commune] plants and started ovipositing. Note the deposited eggs in Jane's photo. It was a very special early event for June 9th. Jane’s previous records indicate arrival on July 20th to the 30th, more than a month later. Jane reports that her sister in Ontario also had a Monarch Butterfly visit her yard.

 Also very special was a visit from a NESSUS SPHINX MOTH visiting Lilac blooms. The diagnostic white rear abdominal bands show beautifully.

 

Jane also came across a large grouping of CANADIAN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLIES [Papillon tigré du Canada] puddling at the St. Martins harbour on Wednesday. Puddling is a behavior in which butterflies will seek out nutrients on certain moist substrates such as rotting plant material, feces, mud, carrion, etc. where they suck up the nutrients they seek. I have seen this frequently with different species of butterflies attracted to fish scale and offal. It can be quite a display of colour. I noted a similar thing on Wednesday morning with approximately 40 Canadian Tiger Swallowtail Butterflies flying about a landing area where fishermen come in with fish.

 

** Following the reports made by Gordon Rattray and Brian Stone earlier this week Yves and Suzette Poussart visited the Hopewell Rocks looking to see and photograph the PEREGRINE FALCONS [Faucon pèlerin] and the chicks. Upon arrival the 3 chicks were present and moving around and vocalizing. Half an hour later one adult arrived bringing some food which seemed to be much appreciated. On one of the numerous photos taken it could be seen that the prey was a CEDAR WAXWING [Jaseur d'Amérique]. The adult falcon was clearly supervising the scene with great attention until it left the site. Yves was able to get a rewarding set of photos showing the chicks and one adult. Yves said that this visit had been a most interesting one and he plans to follow this family during the rest of the summer.

 

** Leigh Eaton got a nice photo of an AMERICAN ROBIN [Merle d'Amérique] that shows white patches especially in the head area. This is a form of albinism that some refer to as partial albino, which would be my preference in this case, but some refer to as leucistic. There seems to be no adverse effect to this genetic quirk, but every one is a unique individual copy.

 

 

** On Tuesday Brian Stone went behind Crandall University to see if the Pink Lady's Slipper Orchids were fully in bloom. On his way to their location he got photos of a BLUISH SPRING MOTH hiding from the camera (Editor’s note: Take note of the Bluish Spring Moth, it can easily be mistaken for one of our Blue species of butterfly), a CANADIAN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLY [Papillon tigré du Canada], a couple COMMON RINGLET BUTTERFLIES [Satyre fauve], a DREAMY DUSKYWING BUTTERFLY [Hespérie givrée], and an EASTERN TENT CATERPILLAR. 

While he was walking a METALLIC WOOD BORING BEETLE flew into his shoulder with a noticeable impact. It immediately seemed to play dead, maybe a survival adaptation.

 

He checked out the puddle on the road/trail and it was half the size that it was the time he was there before. The same tadpoles and beetle larvae were present and 3 salamander larvae were actively swimming near the surface looking like their development was progressing nicely. He may have to rescue them soon, but rain is scheduled to occur in the next few days so hopefully that might come to the rescue.

 

In the woods the Lady's Slippers were finally in their full pink bloom and he took photos. A RED-EYED VIREO [Viréo aux yeux rouges] presented itself for a photo further along the trail and OVENBIRDS [Paruline couronnée], ALDER FLYCATCHERS [Moucherolle des aulnes], and BLACK-THROATED GREEN WARBLERS [Paruline à gorge noire] were heard frequently. A fledgling RAVEN [Grand corbeau] was heard calling and being called by one or maybe more adults in a loud cacophony of sound.  

 

This area behind Crandall University has treated Brian very well with a surprising diversity.

 

** The COMMON BLACKBERRY is a common and attractive blooming berry and it is so humbling each spring to forget recognizing it from photos, Gart Bishop to the memory rescue!

 

** Daryl Doucet was driving on Highway 15 on Wednesday and there was a dead male COMMON EIDER [Eider à duvet] on the side of the road and coming back 2 hours later saw another dead male Common Eider on the Trans Canada near the Shediac Rd. There was a large, brown duck sitting on the road on the side of the highway which may have been an immature male. It is that time of year when the male eiders enter their eclipse plumage and become near flightless for a period and casualties are often noted. Daryl also wondered about them mistaking the road for water and not easily being able to take flight. Both factors are a rule out.

 

**I was feeling a bit left out with the LUNA MOTH reports yet none had chosen to visit my less than elaborate moth attractor set-up. That all changed on the regular morning check on Thursday morning when 2 had arrived during the night. A bit surprising as it was a very cool night after some very warm nights. One had a very heavy feathered antennae to indicate a male and was in perfect fresh condition as it tried to peer into a window (yeah, needing paint) while the female with much smaller antennae was huddled into a warmer corner with a ROSY MAPLE MOTH. Note she is a bit more tattered suggesting she has been out on her mating mission for a few/several nights.  

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton


PEREGRINE FALCON NEST AT HOPEWELL ROCKS. JUNE 9, 2021.  YVES POUSSART

PEREGRINE FALCON NEST AT HOPEWELL ROCKS. JUNE 9, 2021.  YVES POUSSART

PEREGRINE FALCON NEST AT HOPEWELL ROCKS. JUNE 9, 2021.  YVES POUSSART

PEREGRINE FALCON NEST AT HOPEWELL ROCKS. JUNE 9, 2021.  YVES POUSSART

PEREGRINE FALCON NEST AT HOPEWELL ROCKS. JUNE 9, 2021.  YVES POUSSART

PEREGRINE FALCON NEST AT HOPEWELL ROCKS. JUNE 9, 2021.  YVES POUSSART

AMERICAN ROBIN. JUNE 9, 2021. LEIGH EATON

RED-EYED VIREO. JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

RAVEN (FLEDGLING). JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

MONARCH BUTTERFLY OVIPOSITING. JUNE 9, 2021. JANE LEBLANC.

NESSUS SPHINX MOTH. JUNE 9, 2021. JANE LEBLANC

COMMON RINGLET BUTTERFLY. JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

COMMON RINGLET BUTTERFLY. JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

DREAMY DUSKYWING BUTTERFLY. JUNE 08, 2021., BRIAN STONE

DREAMY DUSKYWING BUTTERFLY. JUNE 08, 2021., BRIAN STONE


CANADIAN TIGER SWALLOWTAILS (PUDDLING). JUNE 9, 2021. JANE LEBLANC

CANADIAN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL BUTTERFLY. JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

BLUISH SPRING MOTH. JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

LUNA MOTH (MALE). JUNE 10, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

LUNA MOTH (FEMALE).  JUNE 10, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

LUNA MOTH (FEMALE) AND ROSY MAPLE MOTH. JUNE10, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

SALAMANDER LARVA. JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

SALAMANDER LARVA. JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

METALLIC WOOD BORING BEETLE. JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

EASTERN TENT CATERPILLAR. JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

CLINTONIA FLOWER CLUSTER. JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

COMMON BLACKBERRY (Rubus allegheniensis). JUNE  7, 2021. GORDON RATTRAY

PINK LADY'S SLIPPER ORCHID. JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE

PINK LADY'S SLIPPER ORCHID. JUNE 08, 2021. BRIAN STONE