Sunday, 12 September 2021

Sept 12 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, September 12, 2021 (Sunday)

 

 

To respond by e-mail, please address your message to the information line editor,  nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com .

 

Please advise the editor at nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com  if any errors are noted in wording or photo labelling.


For more information on Nature Moncton, check the website at
www.naturemoncton.com .

 

Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: Louise Nichols nicholsl@eastlink.ca

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

** On Friday, Rosita Lanteigne, Michel Chiasson, and Corinne DeGrace observed a BLACK VULTURE in the area of Lac Frye on Miscou Island.  It was in the company of a TURKEY VULTURE.  Rosita commented it has been in that area for at least a week.  It would be interesting to see the two species in flight at the same time.  The Black Vulture has prominent white patches at the base of the primaries.  The wings are shorter and broader, and flight a rapid flapping with short glides, usually with the wings flat, quite different from the Turkey Vulture flight.  Their year-round range is much to the south of us in southwestern U.S. into Mexico, so it’s a long way from its home range.

 

 

** Aldo Dorio got some great photos of young-of-the-year CEDAR WAXWINGS enjoying what appears to be Chokecherries still in fruit at Hay Island.  The Cedar Waxwing is a late nester and we don’t see the juvenile birds until now and late into fall.  The young are very streaked with few markings other than the bright yellow banded tail.  With the abundant fruit supply this year, we may see more Cedar Waxwings overwintering in New Brunswick.

 

** Verica LeBlanc visited the Escuminac area on Saturday to take note of the DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANTS, GREAT BLUE HERONS, sandpipers, and SEMIPALMATED PLOVER.  She suspected a SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER sustained an injury as it was skipping a strange way, more like hopping, and dragging its front right leg.

  

 

** The past few days seem to have brought on a flush of HORSE MUSHROOMS (Araricus arvensis).  Many folks use these as choice edibles.  They often grow on lawns and field areas.  They can become quite large when expanded open.  When used to verifying identification features, they are relatively easy to identify.  As they emerge, there is a heavy partial veil from the stalk to the cap that breaks away as they expand.  When fresh, the gills are pale to dark pink, getting darker after a day or so.  The spore print is surprisingly black which is a helpful ID clue if first becoming comfortable with the species.  They can sometimes grow in large rings of individuals.  Several photos are attached from Saturday to illustrate these points.

 

**It is that time of the season when the Underwing Moth group are more prevalent. They are medium sized moths that are fairly drab until they take flight to show the colourful underwing markings. Most have pink/red and black underwings or yellow and black with one species with white and black underwings. I had one of the pink and black underwing moths visit Friday night and am suspecting the DARLING UNDERWING MOTH, but they can be a bit tricky to identify with certainty and very uncooperative about showing their striking underwings to photographers. An attempt is attached.

 

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton


CEDAR WAXWING (YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR). SEPT 11, 2021.  ALDO DORIO

CEDAR WAXWING (YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR). SEPT 11, 2021.  ALDO DORIO

CEDAR WAXWING (YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR). SEPT 11, 2021.  ALDO DORIO

SEMIPALMATED PLOVER (YOUNG-OF-THE-YEAR). SEPT 11, 2021. VERICA LeBLANC

SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER (SUSPECTED LEG INJURY). SEPT 11, 2021. VERICA LeBLANC

DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT (JUVENILE). SEPT 11, 2021. VERICA LeBLANC

DARLING UNDERWING (SUSPECTED). SEPT 11, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

DARLING UNDERWING (SUSPECTED). SEPT 11, 2021. NELSON POIRIER

HORSE MUSHROOM (AGARICUS ARVENSIS). SEPT 11, 2021. NELSON POIRIER 

HORSE MUSHROOM (AGARICUS ARVENSIS). SEPT 11, 2021. NELSON POIRIER 

HORSE MUSHROOM (AGARICUS ARVENSIS). SEPT 11, 2021. NELSON POIRIER 

 

No comments:

Post a Comment