Monday, 13 September 2021

Sept 13 2021

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, September 13, 2021 (Monday)

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by Susan Richards susan_richards@rogers.com

Info Line #: 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 

**Pat MacLauchlan came across a young buck WHITE-TAILED DEER showing some unusual white spotting arrangements that he has never seen before.  Pat is an experienced outdoor person and suspect that he has seen many White-tailed Deer.

The only weak explanation I can offer is an unusual manifestation of piebald.  Sometimes wounds will heal over with new hair coming in white, but think this pattern rules out this possibility.

 

**Sue and Fred Richards came across the striking BEDSTRAW HAWK-MOTH aka GALLIUM SPHINX caterpillar on Sunday. The colour can be variable, but the general pattern is always the same with the signature red horn over the tail. It appeared to be trying to dig its way into the earth they had delivered for their greenhouse.  There were still piles they hadn't raked up and it was in a pile on the grass near their working area.  Susan put it in the caged garden after photographing it.

No doubt, it was preparing to go into its pupal stage in a cocoon for the winter. If this is kept in an enclosed area such as an aquarium and in the cold, the beautiful adult moth will emerge in the spring. We don’t tend to see the adults often as they are not attracted to lights like so many other moths.

Am attaching a photo of the large beautiful adult I got a few years ago after housing the cocoon for the winter and the emerged adult beside it.

 

**Maureen Girvan visited the BOUCTOUCHE DUNE BOARDWALK on Sunday to leave a photo of the boardwalk and a BALD EAGLE keeping a watch on the goings-on.

 

 

 **Yolande Leblanc in Memramcook comments she still has 2 RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRDS but with 3 feeders out, still wonders how some yards can have several coming to a feeder, when she always gets the combatant ones that seem to think the 3 feeders are solely for a chosen few.

 

**Aldo Dorio photographed a RED-THROATED LOON on Hay Island on Sunday.  It’s still showing the brick-red throat/neck patch of breeding plumage and holding its bill slanted upward as it always does and helps to identify its silhouette that we get to see in ice-free water off our coastline in winter plumage.

 

**Gabriel Gallant found some HEDGEHOG MUSHROOMS.  This mushroom happens to be classed as a choice edible with a fruity odor.  It is very easy to recognize with its soft, toothlike undersurface and a pale brown cap.  It is also known as SWEET TOOTH MUSHROOM.

 

**Rosita Lanteigne sends some photos of mushrooms wondering about identity.  It’s a BOLETE and sure looks to me like the KING BOLETE (BOLETUS EDULIS) which is actually a choice edible.  The thing to really look for is a pattern that looks like a fishing net imprint on the stalk for a few inches just below where it joins the cap.  I think I can see it in 2 photos and the area is arrowed.  These mushrooms can grow surprisingly large and are often found associated with conifers.  The other mushroom that has this net pattern is the BITTER BOLETE.  It’s a smaller and more white-to- pale-pink underneath.  It’s not toxic but tastes very bitter.  You can actually safely take a small piece of a specimen, taste it, and spit it out.  If it’s a Bitter Bolete, you’ll quickly know!

Google has a firehose of information on the King Bolete.  It is sometimes seen in grocery stores where it is called PORCINI with the same scientific name Boletus edulis.

As always, be absolutely confident of your identification when using wild mushrooms as edibles.  There are a lot of great ones out there with very unique flavours, but there are species out there to avoid ingesting. 

 

 nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton

 

RED-THROATED LOON. SEPT 12, 2021.  ALDO DORIO

RED-THROATED LOON. SEPT 12, 2021.  ALDO DORIO

RED-THROATED LOON. SEPT 12, 2021.  ALDO DORIO

BALD EAGLE. SEPT 12, 2021.  MAUREEN GIRVAN

BALD EAGLE. SEPT 12, 2021.  MAUREEN GIRVAN

WHITETAIL DEER (WITH WHITE SPOTTING). SEPT 12, 2021. PAT MacLAUCHLAN

BEDSTRAW HAWK-MOTH CATERPILLAR. SEPT 12, 2021.  SUSAN RICHARDS

BEDSTRAW HAWK-MOTH CATERPILLAR. SEPT 12, 2021.  SUSAN RICHARDS

BEDSTRAW HAWK-MOTH (HYLES GALLII) AKA GALLIUM SPHINX WITH EMPTIED COCOON. JUNE 14, 2020. NELSON POIRIER

HEDGEHOG MUSHROOM (HYDNUM REPANDUM). SEPT 12, 2021. GABRIEL GALLANT

HEDGEHOG MUSHROOM (HYDNUM REPANDUM). SEPT 12, 2021. GABRIEL GALLANT

HEDGEHOG MUSHROOM (HYDNUM REPANDUM). SEPT 12, 2021. GABRIEL GALLANT

KING BOLETE (SUSPECTED). SEPT 12, 2021. ROSITA LANTEIGNE


 

BOUCTOUCHE DUNE BOARDWALK. SEPTEMBER 12 2021. MAUREEN GIRVAN