Friday, 13 May 2022

May 13 2022

NATURE MONCTON NATURE NEWS

May 13, 2022 (Friday)

 

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

 


**Aldo Dorio got some pleasant photographs of a Hermit Thrush at Hay Island on Thursday. This is normally one of our first thrushes to join us except for the American Robin.

 

**Fred Dube got a nice photo of a Fishing Spider. This is one of the larger spiders that we can expect to see this time of year and can span up to 3 inches. It is usually found near bodies of water. It can bite humans if provoked but normally of no danger unless someone is allergic. It is considered semiaquatic and can dive into shallow water to prey on small fish or tadpoles.

 

**Lynn Dube photographed a sharply dressed Chipping Sparrow that interrupted its white millet breakfast to pose for a photograph.

A colourful male Evening Grosbeak caught the attention of Lynn’s lens as well.

Lynn also spotted a Mourning Cloak Butterfly looking a bit worn from wintering as the adult. This butterfly species has been pleasantly numerous this year.

 

**Nelson Poirier is noting the male Rose-breasted Grosbeak that arrived on May 10 is still visiting solo. Normally 3-5 arrive about the same time so this individual is possibly an advanced guard.

 

**It’s Friday and time to look at Curt Nason’s outlook for next week’s sky. Take note of Curt’s photo of the lunar eclipse that is to take place Sunday evening into Monday morning.

 

This Week’s Sky at a Glance, 2022 May 14 – May 21
The Moon takes centre stage this week with perhaps the most significant stargazing event of the year: all the stages of a total lunar eclipse from Sunday evening into early Monday. Although the Moon starts slipping into Earth’s dark shadow at 11:27 pm, look for subtle gray shading on the lunar surface beginning 30 minutes sooner. This is the penumbra, a lesser shadow created when Earth partly covers the Sun as seen from the Moon. Between 11:27 and 12:29 am the dark umbra will creep across the lunar surface toward totality. Note that the umbra appears on the left side, which indicates the Moon is moving eastward in its orbit rather than the westward motion we see as our planet rotates. Also, note the curvature of the shadow. The Greeks noticed the curvature more than two millennia ago and correctly assumed it was because the Earth is spherical. Watch for more stars to appear as totality approaches and the sky darkens.

Totality lasts for about 85 minutes, ending at 1:54 am. The Moon could take on a red or orange hue before and during totality, caused by our atmosphere acting like a prism and bending the red part of the sunlight moonward. It could also appear darker than usual if volcanic dust from the Hunga Tonga eruption in January remains high in the atmosphere. You might also note that the bottom of the Moon is brighter than the top. The Moon passes just below the centre of Earth’s shadow during this eclipse, so the lower portion is farther from the deepest and darkest part of the umbra. For an hour after totality you get to watch the partial phase play out in reverse, followed by the fading of the penumbra.

 Our next lunar eclipse will occur on the morning of November 8, with the Moon setting shortly after the end of totality. After that we will have to wait until March 14, 2025 to see the shady Moon.

This Week in the Solar System
Saturday’s sunrise in Moncton is at 5:47 am and sunset will occur at 8:43 pm, giving 14 hours, 56 minutes of daylight (5:55 am and 8:46 pm in Saint John). Next Saturday the Sun will rise at 5:40 am and set at 8:51 pm, giving 15 hours, 11 minutes of daylight (5:48 am and 8:54 pm in Saint John).

The Moon is full and near the middle of Earth’s shadow very early on Monday. Mercury is moving sunward rapidly on its way to inferior conjunction next Saturday. Mars passes a moon-width below Neptune on Wednesday morning but the low altitude or twilight will make this a difficult sighting in a telescope. As Mars closes the gap to Jupiter, Venus races eastward against the stars to widen the spread of the four morning planets. Early rising Saturn is starting to look lonely far to their west.

On Sunday evening at 8 pm, tune in to the Sunday Night Astronomy Show via the Facebook page or YouTube channel of Astronomy by the Bay.

Questions? Contact Curt Nason at nasonc@nbnet.nb.ca.

 

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier

Nature Moncton

                                                                                           

 

HERMIT THRUSH. MAY 12, 2022.  ALDO DORIO

HERMIT THRUSH. MAY 12, 2022.  ALDO DORIO

CHIPPING SPARROW. MAY 11, 2022. LYNN DUBE

EVENING GROSSBEAK. MY 11, 2022. LYNN DUBE

ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK (MALE). MAY 10, 2022. NELSON POIRIER

TREE SWALLOW. MAY 12, 2022. ANNA TUCKER

MOURNING CLOAK BUTTERFLY. MAY 11, 2022. LYNN DUBE

FISHING SPIDER. MAY 11, 2022. FRED DUBE

FISHING SPIDER. MAY 11, 2022. FRED DUBE

Collage Lunar Eclipse Paul Owen