Tuesday, 3 December 2019

Dec 3 2019

 NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, December 3, 2019 (Tuesday)

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com
Transcript by: david.cannon@rogers.com
Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)


**  Dan Hicks has had a MINK [Vison d'Amerique] visiting a pond at his Elmwood Drive property the last few days. Dan comments that it has been very inquisitive, scurrying around the pond, and even rolling around in the bit of snow present Sunday. Dan has not seen it catch any fish yet, but suspects that is its interest in the pond. Note the white patch under the chin that is a feature of all wild mink.

**   Pam Watters and Phil Riebel’s INDOOR CAT [Chat d’interieur] found a SHREW [Musaraigne] in their basement, to offer them as a gift. The upshot is that this enabled Phil to take some great photos to show some of the ID features that differentiate a SHREW from a VOLE, or STAR-NOSED MOLE.  The front paws of the STAR-NOSED MOLE, our only resident MOLE [Taupe], has very obvious tentacles on the front of its nose, and its front paws are massive, to enable its bull-dozing earth-moving behaviour. The VOLE has a very rounded, blunt, nose, whereas the SHREW has a long, extended snood of a nose, and an over-extended jaw. We have 3 VOLE species in New Brunswick, all similar to each other, and several SHREW species that, again, share basic similarities.

**  Rheal Vienneau forwards a photo of a HEMLOCK LOOPER MOTH taken by a friend during the past summer. This mid-sized moth is problematic in that its larvae are defoliators of several conifer species. As its names suggests, it targets HEMLOCK trees, but it also goes to BALSAM FIR, WHITE PINE and RED SPRUCE.



Nelson Poirier,
Nature Moncton






MINK. DEC 1, 2019. DAN HICKS

HEMLOCK LOOPER MOTH. VIA RHEAL VIENNEAU

SHREW (DORSAL VIEW).DEC 2, 2019.  PHIL RIEBEL

SHREW (VENTRAL VIEW).DEC 2, 2019.  PHIL RIEBEL

SHREW.DEC 2, 2019. PHIL RIEBEL
(FRONT PAW) DEC 2, 2019. PHIL RIEBEL

SHREW(TAIL AND REAR PAWS) DEC 2, 2019. PHIL RIEBEL