Tuesday, 30 June 2020

June 30 2020

NATURE MONCTON INFORMATION LINE, June 30, 2020 (Tuesday)

 

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Edited by: Nelson Poirier nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Transcript by: david.cannon@rogers.com

Info Line # 506-384-6397 (384-NEWS)

 

 

** Suzanne and Yves Poussant visited Highland Park in Salisbury on Sunday. They found it a nice place overall, but Yves' interest was more stimulated by the presence of some HUMMINGBIRD CLEARWING MOTHS [sphinx colibri] flying around the numerous flowers of SPREADING DOGBANE. Yves took advantage of the opportunity to take some excellent photos of this interesting day-flying moth which was stalking a new flower every few seconds. When looking at the literature at home an interesting situation was noted as Yves realized that every time a moth had established a contact with the flower with its left foreleg it was getting the nectar with its proboscis. Maybe that doing so the moth can establish the exact distance to stay stable while getting the nectar. Yves’ photos tend to illustrate this.

In addition to this context, DAMSELFLIES [demoiselle élancée] (often noted in tandem mating wheels), and DRAGONFLIES of different species were present in great numbers: CANADIAN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL [Papillon tigré du Canada], ATLANTIS FRITILLARY [Argynne de l'Atlantique] , and NORTHERN CRESCENT BUTTERFLY [Croissant nordique] were the main species of butterfly seen and  photographed. Clusters of flowers of the MILKWEED are formed but not yet opened. A photo of a YELLOW WARBLER [Paruline jaune] carrying what appears to be LACEWINGS is also included.

** There have been two inquiries over the past week about wasp nests with a long tubular entry. Bridgitte Ledermann in Hampton got good photos of one under an eave. The literature describes this as an entrance tube in the early stage of construction of some nests which the wasps will get rid of by building over it or removing it once more workers reach adulthood and make the nest more standard rounded football or basketball-sized. The wasp Bridgette photographed is the BALD-FACED HORNET (actually a wasp). It will be interesting to see more photos in the weeks to come to see if this truly happens.

** Margie Scott-Rogers got an excellent photo of the DRYAD’S SADDLE, a.k.a. PHEASANT BACK MUSHROOM. This specimen appears quite fresh with several shelves that grew together. They grow on decaying logs, stumps, and injured trees, and have a taste for dead elm trees. In the fresh state they have a cucumber or watermelon odour and the literature classes them as a good edible before they age and get tough.

** Brian Stone did his Gorge Road run but deeper, on Sunday, past a couple of bogs near Mapleton Road. There is a BALD EAGLE’s [Pygargue à tête blanche] nest there in a large WHITE PINE tree that I suspect is very seldom visited. One eaglet was in the nest and an unimpressed adult nearby. As he was photographing both, a mouse or vole darted into its hole and peeked at him, waiting for him to be on his way. Brian photographed a BOG COPPER [Cuivre des tourbières], and LITTLE WOOD SATYR [Petit satyre des bois] BUTTERFLY as well as both EBONY AND RIVER JEWELWING  DAMSELFLIES and also the dragonflies: BELTED WHITEFACE[leucorrhine apprivoisée], DOT-TAILED WHITEFACE [leucorrhine mouchetée], with a BULLHEAD LILY as a backdrop, a FOUR-SPOTTED SKIMMER [libellule à quatre taches], and a COMMON WHITETAIL [libellule lydienne], and a close-up photo of a CLICK BEETLE [taupin trimarqué] that didn't play dead as this insect sometimes does.

nelsonpoirier435@gmail.com

Nelson Poirier,

Nature Moncton




 

HUMMINGBIRD CLEARWING MOTH. JUNE 28, 2020.  YVES POUSSART

HUMMINGBIRD CLEARWING MOTH. JUNE 28, 2020.  YVES POUSSART

HUMMINGBIRD CLEARWING MOTH. JUNE 28, 2020.  YVES POUSSART

HUMMINGBIRD CLEARWING MOTH. JUNE 28, 2020.  YVES POUSSART

DRYAD'S SADDLE AKA PHEASANT BACK MUSHROOM. JUNE 28, 2020. MARGIE SCOTT-ROGERS

BALD-FACED HORNET NEST (LONG TUBULAR ENTRY). JUNE 28, 2020.  BRIGITTE LEDERMANN


BALD-FACED HORNET NEST (LONG TUBULAR ENTRY). JUNE 28, 2020.  BRIGITTE LEDERMANN

BALD EAGLE NEST (EAGLET). JUNE 28, 2020.. BRIAN STONE

BALD EAGLE NEST. JUNE 28, 2020.. BRIAN STONE

BOG FRITILLARY BUTTERFLY. JUNE 28, 2020.. BRIAN STONE

LITTLE WOOD SATYR BUTTERFLY. JUNE 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

YELLOW WARBLER. JUNE 28, 2020.  YVES POUSSART

SMALL MAMMAL HOLE. JUNE 28, 2020.. BRIAN STONE

TWIN FLOWER. JUNE 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

COMMON MILKWEED NEAR BLOOMING. JUNE 28, 2020.  YVES POUSSART

CLICK BEETLE. JUNE 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

BULLHEAD LILY AND DOT-TAILED WHITEFACE DRAGONFLY. JUNE 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

COMMON WHITETAIL DRAGONFLY (FEMALE). JUNE 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

COMMON WHITETAIL DRAGONFLY (MALE). JUNE 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

FOUR-SPOTTED SKIMMER DRAGONFLY. JUNE 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

RIVER JEWELWING DAMSELFLY (MALE). JUNE 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

EBONY JEWELWING DAMSELFLY (MALE). JUNE 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

DOT-TAILED WHITEFACE DRAGONFLY. JUNE 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

BELTED WHITEFACE DRAGONFLY. JUNE 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

BELTED WHITEFACE DRAGONFLY. JUNE 28, 2020. BRIAN STONE

BLUET DAMSELFLIES IN MATING WHEEL. JUNE 28, 2020.  YVES POUSSART